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Software

Why Migration Costs. Smoothing the way for software change.

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Software

People often find it overwhelming when they start to use a new program like OpenOffice.org, or a new operating system like Linux. The software feels unfamiliar, tools and options aren’t where they are expected, favourite features are missing, and the experience leads to a sense of powerlessness.

Photo Management on Linux - Part 2

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Software

community.zdnet.co.uk: When I am looking for a photo management program, I want one which meets most or all of the following requirements. So, working within these expectations, here are some of the programs that are available on Linux.

Workrave: Useful or Useless?

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Software

junauza.com: Workrave is a free and open source software application aimed at computer users who are suffering from occupational diseases such as Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI) and carpal tunnel syndrome.

Three applications for making disc labels

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Software

linux.com: Making labels for DVDs and their cases is an often overlooked task. Many discs are lucky to have some terse information quickly scrawled on them after burning. But there are some fine open source applications available for creating labels for CD-ROM and DVD disks and printing jewel case inserts.

Why there are over 2 dozen music players

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Software

ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: People often groan when they hear of someone making another game of Tetris, Window Manager, or audio program. After all, people ask, “Do we really need another? Why can’t you just contribute to fixing annoying bug X in gTetris/KDE/xmms?” I’ve always been on the side of the argument that said - “So what! But why create another?

Photo Management on Linux - Part 1

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Software

community.zdnet: There are a number of different photo management programs available for Linux - more than I have either the time or interest to look at, honestly - and of course different versions of Linux have different programs available. I'll try to give a brief overview of both of these areas.

Killer open source monitoring tools

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Software

infoworld.com: In the real estate world, the mantra is location, location, location. In the network and server administration world, the mantra is visibility, visibility, visibility. If you don't know what your network and servers are doing at every second of the day, you're flying blind.

Audioplayers are easy, right?

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Software

the-gay-bar.com: I love music. When I moved to Linux I started out with XMMS, a WinAmp Clone, no surprises there, things worked as I was used to. Along came the "Library based" players that offered so much more.

lns: Simple symbolic links

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Software

arstechnica.com: Sometimes an idea so simple, so brilliant, so obvious crosses your path and you think, "D'oh! Why didn't I come up with this several decades ago?" This morning, I once again experienced that sense of awe and shame, when fellow staffers Ryan and Clint pointed me to lns.

Make ‘Frets On Fire’ Even Better With Mods

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Software

makeuseof.com: Frets on Fire is a rhythm game from the likes of Guitar Hero and Rock Band. In short, Frets on Fire is a free, open-source, multi-platform rhythm game.

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LibreOffice Ported To 64-bit ARM (AArch64)

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SUSE's Flavio Castelli on Docker's Rise Among Linux Distros

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