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Makagiga, the taskmanager with the funny name

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fishbowl42.com/blog: On the computer, I am surprisingly orderly but my life outside of the computer is a different story. I have been thinking there needs to be some way I can digital organize the non digital parts of my life. So i went looking.

Impressions of C#

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gamemank.wordpress: Over the last month and a half I’ve been working on an application using C#, .NET, and Windows.Forms in Visual Studio 2008. At first it seemed like they took the worst instead of the best things from Java and C++, but overall I’ve gotten to like the language. Here are some of my thoughts.

Viewnior: A simple and elegant image viewer

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linuxhub.net: Images are part of our every day Internet usage and a good image viewer is an integral part of a good operating system. Viewnior is one such application for Linux.

Kustodian - a taskbar and quicklauncher combined

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kdedevelopers.org: I'd like to introduce a little pet project of mine: Kustodian, which some people would call a ripoff of the mac dock or windows 7 taskbar. But I maintain it's a thing of it's own, but it indeed has some similarities.

5 Best Free/Open-Source Mind Mapping Software for Linux

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junauza.com: An outline used to illustrate words, ideas, tasks, or other items linked to and arranged around a central key word or idea is called a mind map. Here are some of the best Free and Open Source mind mapping applications that are available for Linux:

Announcing Tangerine 0.3.1

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lamalex.net: Tangerine is a sharing program for your music. Tangerine allows you to share your media with people nearby over the DAAP protocol.

KDE MediaCenter

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alediaferia.wordpress: Finally we have a working mediacenter. Let’s see the most important things i’ve implemented so far:

Karmic to Banshee oh and SID

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thelinuxlink.net: Time to put on my freedom hating hat. Yesterday I decided to jump on Karmic Koala at work. I did my usual style of upgrade by changing my sources.list to point to karmic instead of juanty. The upgrade went off with little hitch but the fun started when I rebooted.

Top 5 Email Client For Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows Users

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cyberciti.biz: Linux comes with various GUI based email client to stay in touch with your friends and family, and share information in newsgroups with other users. The following software is similar to Outlook Express or Windows Live Mail and is used by both home and office user.

Earcandy is the next cool thing you want in Linux

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ubuntumanual.org: Earcandy is a PulseAudio volume manager, which for me is probably the first thing that i ever liked about pulse audio. This volume manager could mute music in your amarok or rhythombox or literally any music player when you play some video in youtube or VLC or other video players.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Google's Upspin Debuts

  • Another option for file sharing
    Existing mechanisms for file sharing are so fragmented that people waste time on multi-step copying and repackaging. With the new project Upspin, we aim to improve the situation by providing a global name space to name all your files. Given an Upspin name, a file can be shared securely, copied efficiently without "download" and "upload", and accessed by anyone with permission from anywhere with a network connection.
  • Google Developing "Upspin" Framework For Naming/Sharing Files
    Google today announced an experimental project called Upspin that's aiming for next-generation file-sharing in a secure manner.
  • Google releases open source file sharing project 'Upspin' on GitHub
    Believe it or not, in 2017, file-sharing between individuals is not a particularly easy affair. Quite frankly, I had a better experience more than a decade ago sending things to friends and family using AOL Instant Messenger. Nowadays, everything is so fragmented, that it can be hard to share. Today, Google unveils yet another way to share files. Called "Upspin," the open source project aims to make sharing easier for home users. With that said, the project does not seem particularly easy to set up or maintain. For example, it uses Unix-like directories and email addresses for permissions. While it may make sense to Google engineers, I am dubious that it will ever be widely used.
  • Google devs try to create new global namespace
    Wouldn't it be nice if there was a universal and consistent way to give names to files stored on the Internet, so they were easy to find? A universal resource locator, if you like? The problem is that URLs have been clunkified, so Upspin, an experimental project from some Google engineers, offers an easier model: identifying files to users and paths, and letting the creator set access privileges.

RPi-friendly home automation kit adds voice recognition support

Following its successful Kickstarter campaign for a standalone Matrix home automation and surveillance hub, and subsequent release of an FPGA-driven Matrix Creator daughter board for use with the Raspberry Pi, Matrix Labs today launched a “Matrix Voice” board on Indiegogo. The baseline board, currently available at early-bird pricing of $45, has an array of 7 microphones surrounding a ring of 18 software-controlled RGBW LEDs. A slightly pricier model includes an MCU-controlled WiFi/Bluetooth ESP32 wireless module. Read more

The Year Of Linux On Everything But The Desktop

The War on Linux goes back to Bill Gates, then CEO of Microsoft, in an “open letter to hobbyists” published in a newsletter in 1976. Even though Linux wouldn’t be born until 1991, Gates’ burgeoning software company – itself years away from releasing its first operating system – already felt the threat of open source software. We know Gates today as a kindly billionaire who’s joining us in the fight against everything from disease to income inequality, but there was a time when Gates was the bad guy of the computing world. Microsoft released its Windows operating system in 1985. At the time, its main competition was Apple and Unix-like systems. BSD was the dominant open source Unix clone then – it marks its 40th birthday this year, in fact – and Microsoft fired barrages of legal challenges to BSD just like it eventually would against Linux. Meanwhile Apple sued Microsoft over its interface, in the infamous “Look and Feel” lawsuit, and Microsoft’s reign would forever be challenged. Eventually Microsoft would be tried in both the US and the UK for antitrust, which is a government regulation against corporate monopolies. Even though it lost both suits, Microsoft simply paid the fine out of its bottomless pockets and kept right at it. Read more