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Software

Best Ubuntu & Kubuntu Software to Add After Installation

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Software

techexposures.com: Canonical’s Ubuntu & Kubuntu distros are loaded with great software an utilities. There are, however, a bunch of great tools that are not included in their standard installations.

A Guest Essay In Favor of Mono (#1)

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Software

linuxtoday.com/blog: Here we go, the first response to my invitation to anyone who wanted to have their say on the value and benefits of Mono, why it does not represent a threat to Linux, and anything else they might want to say about it.

Stallman, Bender, Lefkowitz and Pavelek Keynote Desktop Summit

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Software

kde.org: The GNOME Foundation and KDE e.V. are excited to announce the keynotes for the first ever co-located Akademy and GUADEC, over 100 talks as well as BOFs, keynote sessions, lightning talks and many opportunities to meet other developers and begin collaborating between projects.

Disinformation Disinfected, pt. 3: Banshee in Ubuntu

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Software

meandubuntu.wordpress: Here, let’s take a look at one of the main things that get’s me going about mono-supporters. There is a strong push to get Banshee in as the default media player in Ubuntu. Here’s my take on that.

Accessing your favorite media via the terminal

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Software
HowTos

ubuntumagazine.net: This article is touches upon learning how to leverage some of the real power of Linux via the terminal. The terminal gives you full control of everything behind the scenes.

Fun Linux Wallpapers

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Software

howtogeek.com: Yeah, it's a little ironic that we'd put together a collection of Linux wallpapers since we cover mostly Microsoft topics—but we're also fans of open-source goodness and use Linux all the time.

First Linux USB 3.0 drivers emerge

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Software

linuxpromagazine.com: After a year-and-a-half's worth of work, Intel hacker Sarah Sharp announced that Linux will be the first operating system supporting USB 3.0.

Ubuntu vs. Kubuntu - A Linux Lover’s Challenge

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Software

techexposures.com: Both Ubuntu and Kubuntu are based on the same cannonical distribution and core. The only (and important) difference between them is the desktop environment offered with either option.

Qt vs GTK: Conclusion

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Software

celettu.wordpress: After writing four posts about this, it’s time to wrap it up. Over the last few weeks I installed and tested enough software to last a lifetime and I feel confident to draw a couple of conclusions.

Five Essential Apps for the Ubuntu User

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Software

geeks.com: There's a lot of software for Ubuntu. A lot of it's good, some of it's OK, and there are a few duds. But the five applications that this TechTip covers are great additions to anyone's installation of Ubuntu.

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  • Apache Graduates Another Big Data Project to Top Level
    For the past year, we've taken note of the many projects that the Apache Software Foundation has been elevating to Top-Level Status. The organization incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, and has squarely turned its focus to Big Data and developer-focused tools in recent months. As Apache moves Big Data projects to Top-Level Status, they gain valuable community support. Only days ago, the foundation announced that Apache Kudu has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). Kudu is an open source columnar storage engine built for the Apache Hadoop ecosystem designed to enable flexible, high-performance analytic pipelines. And now, Apache Twill has graduated as well. Twill is an abstraction over Apache Hadoop YARN that reduces the complexity of developing distributed Hadoop applications, allowing developers to focus more on their application logic.
  • Spark 2.0 takes an all-in-one approach to big data
    Apache Spark, the in-memory processing system that's fast become a centerpiece of modern big data frameworks, has officially released its long-awaited version 2.0. Aside from some major usability and performance improvements, Spark 2.0's mission is to become a total solution for streaming and real-time data. This comes as a number of other projects -- including others from the Apache Foundation -- provide their own ways to boost real-time and in-memory processing.
  • Why Uber Engineering Switched from Postgres to MySQL
    The early architecture of Uber consisted of a monolithic backend application written in Python that used Postgres for data persistence. Since that time, the architecture of Uber has changed significantly, to a model of microservices and new data platforms. Specifically, in many of the cases where we previously used Postgres, we now use Schemaless, a novel database sharding layer built on top of MySQL. In this article, we’ll explore some of the drawbacks we found with Postgres and explain the decision to build Schemaless and other backend services on top of MySQL.
  • GNU Hyperbole 6.0.1 for Emacs 24.4 to 25 is released
    GNU Hyperbole (pronounced Ga-new Hi-per-bo-lee), or just Hyperbole, is an amazing programmable hypertextual information management system implemented as a GNU Emacs package. This is the first public release in 2016. Hyperbole has been greatly expanded and modernized for use with the latest Emacs 25 releases; it supports GNU Emacs 24.4 or above. It contains an extensive set of improvements that can greatly boost your day-to-day productivity with Emacs and your ability to manage information stored across many different machines on the internet. People who get used to Hyperbole find it helps them so much that they prefer never to use Emacs without it.
  • Belgium mulls reuse of banking mobile eID app
    The Belgium government wants to reuse ‘Belgian Mobile ID’ a smartphone app for electronic identification, developed by banks and telecom providers in the country. The eID app could be used for eGovernment services, and the federal IT service agency, Fedict, is working on the app’s integration.
  • Water resilience that flows: Open source technologies keep an eye on the water flow
    Communities around the world are familiar with the devastation brought on by floods and droughts. Scientists are concerned that, in light of global climate change, these events will only become more frequent and intense. Water variability, at its worst, can threaten the lives and well-beings of countless people. Sadly, humans cannot control the weather to protect themselves. But according to Silja Hund, a researcher at the University of British Columbia, communities can build resilience to water resource stress. Hund studies the occurrence and behavior of water. In particular, she studies rivers and streams. These have features (like water volume) that can change quickly. According to Hund, it is essential for communities to understand local water systems. Knowledge of water resources is helpful in developing effective water strategies. And one of the best ways to understand dynamic water bodies like rivers is to collect lots of data.