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Software

Split, Merge, Rotate and Reorder PDF Files in Linux with PDFArranger

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Software

PDFArranger is a nifty little tool that allows you to split, merge, rotate and reorder one or multiple PDF files in Linux.

PDFArranger is actually a fork of PDF-Shuffler project. Even the icon of both project is same. PDF-Shuffler has not see a new development in last seven years so I am glad that someone forked it to continue the development. That’s the beauty of open source where a project is never really dead as others can revive it.

Let’s talk about PDFArranger, what it can do and how it works.

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An Open Source Audio Editor and Recorder

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Software

At some point, most of us need a tool to create, edit, or otherwise manipulate an audio file. If you’re looking for the right tool for the job, allow me to introduce Audacity. Audacity is a free, open source, multiplatform audio file creator and editor. Audacity is one of the first applications that I download on Linux, Windows, and macOS systems. Although developed by a team of volunteers, the interface is simple, the features are professional, and its overall quality rivals any commercial audio creator and editor that I’ve seen or used.

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Proprietary Software: Tools for VMware Administrators, Paragon Patent Tax and WPS Office

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Software
  • Top 26 Tools for VMware Administrators

    VMware software provides cloud computing and platform virtualization services to various users and it supports working with several tools that extend its abilities.

  • Microsoft NTFS For Linux Now Supports Kernels To 4.20.x a

    Paragon Software Group has released Microsoft NTFS for Linux by Paragon Software, a tool granting full access to NTFS and HFS+ volumes from Linux devices. The transfer rate is the same for native Linux file systems and, reportedly, in some cases even better.

  • WPS Office for Linux Update Available to Download

    A new version of WPS Office for Linux, a free (as in beer) productivity suite modelled after Microsoft Office, is now available to download.

    WPS Office v11.1.0.8372 ships with a modest set of improvements and fixes, the majority of which are pulled from the recent Windows’ release of WPS Office 2019.

9 Best Free Linux Digital Forensics Tools

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GNU
Linux
Software

Digital forensics is a specialist art. It allows investigations to be undertaken without modifying the media. Being able to preserve and analyze data in a safe and non-destructive way is crucial when using digital evidence as part of an investigation, and even more so when a legal audit trail needs to be maintained. Digital forensics can be used in a wide range of investigations such as computer intrusion, unauthorised use of computers including the violation of an organisation’s internet-usage policy, gathering intelligence from documents and emails, as well as the protection of corporate assets.

We have extolled the virtues of open source software in many of our previous articles. The debate between open source and closed source software has often centered on factors such as freedom, reliability, interoperability and open standards, support, and philosophy.

In this instance, open source software offers a legal benefit, as it can increase the admissibility of digital forensic evidence. This is because open source tools enable the investigator and court to verify that a tool does what it claims and makes it easier to prove that the original drive has not been modified, or that a copy has not been modified.

Linux has a good range of digital forensics tools that can process data, perform data analysis of text documents, images, videos, and executable files, present that data to the investigator in a form that helps identify relevant data, and to search the data.

To provide an insight into the software that is available, we have compiled a list of 9 of our favorite digital forensics tools. Hopefully, there will be something of interest here for anyone who needs to undertake digital investigations.

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Proprietary: Master PDF Editor, Steam and Tropico 6

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Software
Gaming
  • Download Master PDF Editor 4 For Linux (Free To Use Version)

    Master PDF Editor is a proprietary application to edit PDF documents on Linux, Windows and macOS. It can create, edit (insert text or images), annotate, view, encrypt, and sign PDF documents.

    With version version 5, Master PDF Editor has removed some features from its free to use version, like editing or adding text, inserting images, and more - when using such tools, the application adds a big watermark to the PDF document unless users buy the full version (around $83).

    Master PDF Editor 4 though, which is free for non-commercial use with no restrictions (at least on Linux, I'm not sure about macOS and Windows), can still be downloaded and works well, even though it's not linked on the application official website.

  • A Half-Year Since Valve Released Steam Play For Linux, Its Marketshare Is Still Sub-1%

    With the start of a new month, Valve has just published their updated monthly Steam figures showing the Linux gaming market-share and more.

    For March 2019, they are reporting the Linux gaming population at 0.82% of their overall user-base. This number though is a bit iffy as at the same time they are saying that's a 0.00% change over the month prior... But for February 2019, they had been reporting a 0.77% Linux market-share, which would have been a 0.05% increase. As recently as earlier today they were still reporting 0.77% for February until these "unchanged" 0.82% result was posted for March.

  • Tropico 6 Now Available For PC and Linux

    The wait is finally over, the borders are open and El Presidente welcomes you to visit the island paradise of Tropico. Kalypso Media and Limbic Entertainment are thrilled to announce that Tropico 6, the latest instalment in the critically acclaimed Tropico franchise, launches today globally for Windows PC and Linux (with the Mac version following soon).

    With Penultimo busy grooming prize llama Hector for the Presidential parade to celebrate Tropico 6’s glorious launch, the loyal citizens over at Kalypso HQ have been busily editing El Presidente’s welcome trailer for your enjoyment. So click on the links below and take a sun drenched trip along Tropico’s beautiful sandy beaches and almost dormant volcanos (there’s only a 65% chance of eruption in the coming weeks) by clicking on the links below.

3 cool text-based email clients

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Software

Writing and receiving email is a big part of everyone’s daily routine and choosing an email client is usually a major decision. The Fedora OS provides a large choice of email clients and among these are text-based email applications.

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Excellent Utilities: tmux – terminal multiplexer software

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Software

This is the first in a new series highlighting best-of-breed utilities. We’ll be covering a wide range of utilities including tools that boost your productivity, help you manage your workflow, and lots more besides. For the first article, we’ll put tmux under the spotlight.

tmux is a “terminal multiplexer”. This application enables a number of terminals (or windows) to be created, accessed and controlled from a single screen.

tmux runs as a server-client system. A server is created automatically when necessary and holds a number of sessions, each of which may have a number of windows linked to it.The tmux server manages clients, sessions, windows and panes.

The time you spend context switching between an editor and your consoles can devour your productivity. Take control of your environment with tmux, a terminal multiplexer that you can tailor to your workflow.

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Software: Python IDEs, Kodi, Best alternatives to Skype

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Software
  • 9 Best Free Python Integrated Development Environments (Updated 2019)

    Python is a widely used general-purpose, high level programming language. It’s easy to read and learn. It’s frequently used for science, data analysis, and engineering. With a burgeoning scientific community and ecosystem, Python is an excellent environment for students, scientists and organizations that develop technology software.

    One of the essential tools for a budding Python developer is a good Integrated Development Environment (IDE). An IDE is a software application that provides comprehensive facilities to programmers for software development.

    Many coders learn to code using a text editor. And many professional Python developers prefer to stay with their favourite text editor, in part because a lot of text editors can be used as a development environment by making use of plugins. But many Python developers migrate to an IDE as this type of software application offers, above all else, practicality. They make coding easier, can offer significant time savings with features like autocompletion, and built-in refactoring code, and also reduces context switching. For example, IDEs have semantic knowledge of the programming language which highlights coding problems while typing. Compiling is ‘on the fly’ and debugging is integrated.

  • Are free VPNs any good for Kodi?

    Before we get to the VPNs, let's start with Kodi, which is a free and open source media player.

  • What Is Kodi and How Does It Work?

    What is Kodi? Imagine your own version of Netflix or Amazon Prime Video, but one that is completely free? Sounds too good to be true, right?

  • Best alternatives to Skype 2019: paid and free

    If you're looking for the best Skype alternatives, then you've come to the right place. For many years, Skype has been one of the most popular VoIP (Voice over IP) services, with home and business users alike using it to video and voice call friends and family over the world.

    However, in 2011 Microsoft acquired Skype, and since then it has been tweaking the interface and adding (and removing features) which has not been too popular.

    So, if you're looking to move from Skype to another VoIP service, then this guide to the best Skype alternatives will help you make the leap. We look at both free alternatives to Skype, as well as packages you need to pay for, which is good for large companies with employees around the world.

The 7 Best BitTorrent Clients For File Download

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Software

There are many ways one can go about downloading files off the Internet. The most common is probably the HTTP download that happens whenever you download a file from a website. It could be some free software or a trial version of a paid one. Before web downloads were popular—and even before the web existed—the File Transfer Protocol, or FTP, was the standard way of downloading files. Usenet was another way of exchanging files that once enjoyed a lot of popularity and that has recently made a comeback.

But one of the most used ways of exchanging files on the Internet nowadays is probably the BitTorrent protocol. Often simple called Torrents or Torrenting, it is a peer to peer system that distributes small fragments of files over multiple hosts. Using it requires a special piece of software called a BitTorrent client which can track the various fragments, download them, and assemble them back into the original file.

We’ll start off our exploration by explaining what BitTorrent is and how it works, trying to keep our discussion as non-technical as possible. Then, we’ll have a quick look at the legal aspects of using the system as there seem to be some misconceptions going around. After that, we’ll present the much-awaited reviews of some of the best client applications we could find.

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5 best code editors for Linux users

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Software

Linux is a go-to OS for many developers. Because so many people use Linux for development, the platform is littered with dozens of development tools, both good and bad. If you’re sick of wading through programs to find a good code editor for your Linux development PC, we can help? Here are the five best code editors for Linux!

Looking for mark down editors for Linux? Check out our list of the top 6 mark down editors for Linux.

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Ubuntu: 5 Reasons to Upgrade, Sophia Sanles-Luksetich Interview, Ubuntu on Neural Compute Stick and Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter

  • 5 Reasons to Upgrade to Ubuntu 19.04 "Disco Dingo"
    On the surface, new versions of Ubuntu aren’t as big as they used to be. Like in the days before Canonical created its own Unity interface, the Ubuntu experience is now functionally similar to what you get in alternatives such as Fedora and openSUSE. But there are a few big reasons to be eager for what Ubuntu 19.04 “Disco Dingo” has to offer, with some additions demonstrating just how nice it is to have Ubuntu desktop developers spending more time working directly on GNOME.
  • Women and Nonbinary People in Information Security: Sophia Sanles-Luksetich
    Sophia Sanles-Luksetich: I am a rookie information security consultant. I currently perform bug bounty triage for companies which I am not allowed to name, but let’s just say most folks have heard of these companies. Before I got into information security, I was an IT generalist who dabbled in a bit of programming, Linux and privacy. Ubuntu was actually my first OS. It’s funny to think now that my decision as a 12-year-old could have impacted my career so much ten years later. KC: I must admit that it’s unusual that Ubuntu was your first OS. But that’s great! I use Kubuntu on my work desktop. Did that make you delve into Debian a bit? SSL: Oh cool! I have dabbled with Debian a bit, but not as much as most folks would expect. I think I learned a lot more soft skills using Ubuntu at a young age. Like when I couldn’t download my favorite game as a kid, I spent hours reading error logs, documentation and forums to figure out how to get the game working on my computer. Open Source Software (OSS) is also very modular compared to a lot of closed source software, so learning how software is built on other software was a big help. Now everything is miles down a supply chain that most people can barely scratch the surface of, at least in my opinion. [...] KC: Excellent. How did you get into Ubuntu computing initially? SSL: We had a family computer that stopped working. Rather than buy a new Windows disk to fix it, I asked around to my friends. Funny enough, one of my friend’s dad worked in information security, and I played board games with him and his son. I asked his son to give me a copy, and he messed it up by downloading it onto the CD rather than doing an image transfer. Lucky for me, I had a bit more a competent IT friend, Rikki, who ripped me a fresh CD. It’s funny, too; she was a lot more like me then, I thought. We both started in theater and ended up getting into computers just because they are resourceful and we were both people who loved the convenience for record keeping. I think what got me into OSS, to begin with, was the idea that I never had to pay for it. I am a cheapskate. I can think of a good chunk of my IT experience that I learned by trying to get something for free. I learned how to torrent, how to not screw up your computer on harmful sites. Always a fun time! [...] SSL: I think if I could give one piece of advice to new cybersecurity folks, I would tell them all to volunteer at conferences and talk to the attendees. You will learn a lot just by talking to people in the field. Oh, and of course, don’t discount soft skills and the fundamentals.
  • How developers are using Intel’s AI tools to make planet Earth a better place
    Biswas first gathered plant data from Google images, then used TensorFlow (widely-used machine learning framework in the deep learning space) and Open Vino (Intel’s neural network optimisation toolkit) to build an AI model. Once the images and videos of plants were captured the model is used to identify the cause of the disease, possible cures and preventive measures. To run these solutions, Biswas used Intel 7th Gen i5 NUC mini PC. [...] Ma took a digital microscope and connected it to a modestly powerful Ubuntu based laptop with Intel’s Neural Compute Stick connected to it. The entire system cost less than $500. The neural network at the heart of the system was able to successfully determine the shape, colour, density, and edges of the Escherichia coli (E. coli) and the bacteria that causes cholera.
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 575
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 575

Android Leftovers

Kodi 'Leia' 18.2 now available to download with bug fixes and performance improvements

The Kodi Foundation made the release candidate for Kodi 18.2 available last week, and today you can grab the final version. As you’d expect, this is a bug fix release with no major new functionality, but there are a number of notable changes including improvements to the music database performance and a new Codec Factory for Android. Read more

howtos and programming leftovers