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Software

Software and Games

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • Gammu release day

    I've just released new versions of Gammu, python-gammu and Wammu. These are mostly bugfix releases (see individual changelogs for more details), but they bring back Wammu for Windows.

    This is especially big step for Wammu as the existing Windows binary was almost five years old. The another problem with that was that it was cross-compiled on Linux and it always did not behave correctly. The current binaries are automatically produced on AppVeyor during our continuous integration.

  • Opera 50 Debuts as World's First Web Browser with Anti-Bitcoin Mining Protection

    Opera Software released today the Opera 50 web browser for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows systems, a major release that comes with innovative new features and dozens of improvements.

    Based on Chromium 63.0.3239.108, Opera 50 appears to be the only major web browser that promised to protect your computer against Bitcoin mining. Dubbed NoCoin, the anti-Bitcoin mining protection has been implemented in Opera's integrated ad blocker, which can be easily enabled in Settings under the Recommended lists of ad filters of the Block ads option.

  • Critical Annihilation is an explosion-heavy and stupidly fun twin-stick shooter

    Critical Annihilation is a twin-stick shooter where every single thing is made out of tiny blocks, it also happens to be an incredibly satisfying experience.

  • Babe Music Player Is Getting a Mobile-Friendly Qml Port

    It’s been almost a year since I publicly stood in front of you all to coo over the Qt-based Babe music player — and now I’m back to coo at it some more.

    You can blame Babe developer Camilo Higuita. He’s shared a new video of his app that has me excited. The clip, which is embedded above, demos the ‘initial work’ he’s made on a Qml port of the Babe that uses Kirgami.

Wine 3.0 Nearly Ready

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Software
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 3.0-rc5 is now available.

  • Wine 3.0-RC5 Released With More Bug Fixes

    We are stepping closer to the official Wine 3.0 release but not quite there yet though it's looking like it could be here within the next week or two.

    Coming out today is the fifth weekly release candidate ahead of Wine 3.0.0. Wine 3.0-RC5 has just nine known bug fixes ranging from taking care of issues with Slingplayer 2.0 to Eclipse Europa to Regedit problems.

Software: Flameshot, GhostWriter, Tablao, Opera 50

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Software
  • Flameshot is the Linux Screenshot Tool I’ve Been Longing for

    As a blogger I take a lot of screenshots and annotate a lot of screenshots. Any app that can help to speed up my workflow is super appreciated.

  • GhostWriter is a gorgeous distraction-free markdown editor for Windows and Linux

    Writers are fiercely loyal to the tools they use. For years, I swore by the ultra-slimline markdown editor iA Writer. Sadly, this hugely popular app is a macOS exclusive, and when I ditched my MacBook Pro to join the PC world, I had to leave it behind.

    For ages now, I’ve searched for a successor to iA Writer, and nothing has ever come close. That is, until I stumbled upon GhostWriter, which is available for Linux and Windows.

    For the past month, I’ve used it as my daily driver on Ubuntu 17.10. I compose almost all of my articles in it. Rather quickly, I’ve become an enthusiastic fan.

  • 20 Free Open Source Applications I Found in Year 2017

    It is time to share a list of the best 20 Free and Open Source Software I found during the year 2017. Some of these programs may not be new in that they weren’t released for the first time in 2017, but they are new and have been helpful to me. It is in the spirit of sharing that I’m writing this article hoping you find some of these programs useful as well.

  • Tablao – The Easiest Way to Create HTML Tables

    Tablao is a cross-platform table editor with which you can easily create tables in HTML the way you would create tables in Excel.

    You no more need to write cumbersome HTML-tags, Markdown- or ASCII tables. But unlike Excel, Tablao creates correct HTML tables without any style information and very easy to use in your own HTML documents.

  • Opera 50 Browser Now Available for Windows, macOS, Linux With Anti-Cryptocurrency Mining Feature and More

    Opera Software has released the latest Opera 50 version desktop browser for Windows, macOS, and Linux. Opera includes numerous new features such as a new anti-cryptomining feature and Chromecast & VR 360 support for the Oculus VR headset. These features were initially available on the beta RC version of Opera 50.

Calamares 3.2 Plan

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Software
  • Calamares 3.2 Upgraded Linux Installer Could Be Here In March

    The Calamares project as a reminder aims to be the universal installer framework for Linux systems that is distribution-agnostic and already used by Manjaro and KaOS and OpenMandriva. Calamares 3.2 is being worked on as the installer framework's next major release.

    Now that we're into 2018, a Calamares 3.2-RC2 release has been made available and they hope to officially ship Calamares 3.2.0 in March.

  • Calamares 3.2 Plan (Revised)

    It’s a new year, and the Calamares 3.1 series has reached 3.1.12, and I’ve been saying that it’s time to switch to Calamares 3.2 development in earnest for some time now. Let’s revisit the Calamares 3.2 plan, and talk about the next three months.

Software: Downloaders, KBibTeX, Atelier and KDE

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Software
  • cURL vs. wget: Their Differences, Usage and Which One You Should Use

    For downloading files directly from the Linux command line, there are two utilities that immediately come to mind: wget and cURL. They share a lot of features and can easily get many of the same tasks accomplished.

    Though they share similar features, they aren’t exactly the same. These programs fit slightly different roles and use cases, and do have traits that make each better for certain situations.

  • KBibTeX 0.7 (the final version for KDE4)

    After a beta version in September and a release candidate in October, there is finally a release of KBibTeX 0.7.
    A tag has been set and tar balls have been published.

    The only changes compared to the release candidate are attempts to fix online search issues with Google Scholar and IEEE Xplore.

  • New Year, New Atelier

    There are about two months now that AtCore reached its beta stage and we release it with the test client.  On my Docker Hub account, the image of AtCore(Master and Beta) was pulled more than 30 times, and based on my Analytics data the AppImage, Windows and MacOs versions were downloaded 30 times.

  • KDE Community Goal: Streamlined onboarding of new contributors

    Over the second half of 2017, KDE has been going through the ambitious effort of having its community propose and choose goals for the next 3-4 years.

    These goals have been set now, and I was thrilled to learn that my proposal on Streamlined onboarding of new contributors was chosen and many other KDE contributors believed this was a goal worth pursuing in the near future and voted for it.

    The other two proposals that were selected are Top-notch Usability and Productivity for Basic Software and Privacy.

Wine 2.0.4

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Software

Software: 20 Must-Have Linux Apps from 2017, Linux Release Roundup, Alibaba's Browser

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Software
  • The Top 20 Must-Have Linux Apps from 2017

    2017 was a good year for many apps. Steam received better updates, Skype for Linux got a design overhaul, and GNOME Tweak Tool will soon be the only tweak tool you’ll need on Ubuntu.

    Months ago we compiled a list of the 20 Must-Have Ubuntu Apps in 2017. Now that 2017 has ended we decided to take a look back on how Linux applications have fared so far in general and compile a list of Top 20 Must-Have Linux Apps from 2017.

  • Linux Release Roundup: LibreOffice, Dash to Dock, Tilix + More

    Some of us will have spent the past week gorging on mince pies and chocolates, making out under mistletoe, and suffering the seasonable indignity of Christmas-themed Hallmark films on Channel 5.

    But not everyone.

    If you’re of the developer variety you might have used your Christmas downtime to work on your own personal projects — just like the developers of the following apps did.

  • A Browser You’ve Never Heard of Is Dethroning Google in Asia

    A mobile browser rarely used in the West has outflanked Google’s Chrome in some of Asia’s fastest-growing markets, giving owner Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. an advantage in the race among technology giants to capture the next generation of internet users.

OpenShot's 2018 Plans

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Software
Movies
  • Happy New Year 2018!

    Happy New Year! Last year was an amazing year for OpenShot, with huge stability and performance improvements, a new interactive transform tool, improvements to animation & key-frames, a new website (translated in 10 languages), a new cloud API (for video automation), improved playback speed, and more than 1 million installs of OpenShot 2.x. Now that 2018 has arrived, I thought it would be fun to discuss the future of OpenShot, and where it's heading for the next year.

  • OpenShot Wants to Crash Less in 2018

    Open source video editor OpenShot has shared a list of 'favourite ideas for 2018' that include improving stability, improving the UI and adding more effects.

  • OpenShot Video Editor Planning For Many Improvements In 2018

    The OpenShot open-source non-linear video editor is planning for many improvements this year.

Software: Git 2.16 RC, Sayonara, Darktable, Thunar, Krita, Snaps

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Software
  • Git v2.16.0-rc0

    An early preview release Git v2.16.0-rc0 is now available for testing at the usual places. It is comprised of 435 non-merge commits since v2.15.0, contributed by 76 people, 22 of which are new faces.

  • Git 2.16 Steps Out With Its First Release Candidate
  • Sayonara

    Not goodbye, but hello to a new music player on my desktop. It is already packaged for FreeBSD and has a long development history.

    Music players stand or fall per individual user whether they satisfy the user’s needs — no duh there, but it means I should note what my use cases are before enthusing about some music player in particular. I would be fine with playing music from the command-line, most of the time: mpg123 --shuffle /mnt/music/*/*/* is just about right (except it fails with an argument list too long error in the shell). This is for music-while-I-hack, so I don’t listen too closely, it’s not hi-fi at all, basically I want “play in a genre until I switch it off“. Tagging is largely done when ripping my CDs (I still buy physical media!) and I don’t care for album art (I can look in the jewel case if I want that, and they’re all stacked in boxes upstairs). So play, pause, stop .. and if it can avoid mixing Mahler with Morrissey and Mötorhead, that’s a bonus.

    [...]

    I’m looking forward to KDE music players Elisa and Babe, for comparison purposes: maybe they tick my requirements-boxes just as well, or better. Certainly Elisa seems to be fairly playing-music-focused. I’ve even got a FreeBSD port for Elisa ready, just waiting for Qt 5.9 to show up on my doorstep (I can get it to compile against 5.7, but it won’t run due to QML runtime thingies).

  • Darktable, the free Lightroom alternative, is available for Windows
  • What’s happening at Thunar?

    In the last few weeks there have been a number of updates and releases of development versions at Xfce. Some of them are core components, others are programmes from the immediate vicinity. Below is a small overview with the highlights around the file manager Thunar:
    Thunar

    The default file manager Thunar got two updates from developer Andre Miranda. Once for the current stable branch version 1.6.3 was released, mainly bugfixes and updates of the translations. Much more interesting is the simultaneously released version 1.7.0, because this is the first one with a view towards Xfce 4.14.

  • Krita 4.0 Is Aiming For Release In March

    The KDE-aligned Krita digital painting software has published a retrospective of 2017 and a look ahead to 2018.

    The Krita project is planning to put their 4.0 string freeze into effect at end of day on New Year's Eve. If all goes as planned, the Krita 4.0 release will then happen in March.

  • Spotify is now available as a Snap app on Ubuntu

    The package means it’s now more convenient for fans of Spotify to install the official client on Ubuntu desktops as no external downloads or repo commands are required.

Wine 3.0 RC4

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Software
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 3.0-rc4 is now available.

  • Wine 3.0 RC4 is now available, more glorious bug fixes

    As expected, another Wine 3.0 release candidate is available today with RC4 bringing in more bug fixes.

    Since they are currently in a code-freeze, they're focusing solely on making Wine 3.0 a solid experience so no new features are currently making their way in.

  • Wine 3.0-RC4 Released With One Dozen Fixes

    The fourth weekly release candidate of Wine 3.0 is now available for testing.

    This time around there are just 12 bug fixes in this release candidate ranging from Richedit to BBC iPlayer to Zoo Tycoon 2 and Call of Duty 4.

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More in Tux Machines

Purism's Linux Phone to Use Convergence for a Unified Experience Across Devices

For Purism, the company that sells quality computers using a Linux-based operating system and are intended to protect user's privacy and freedom, designing a convergent Linux phone is a long-term goal to unify the mobile experience across various devices. Purism's François Téchené shares some initial details on how the company plans to use convergence for their short and long-term design goals of Librem 5, the Linux smartphone that raised more than $2 million on Kickstarter last year, saying they're looking to unify the human experience across different device you might own. Read more

Leftovers: ExeeLinux Show/Unleaded Hangouts, Linux Foundation's CNCF/Akraino and More

  • What’s Holding Linux Back – Unleaded Hangouts
    What’s Holding Linux Back? Obviously we’ve seen some growth, but it does feel like there may be some things that hold Linux back a bit. We discuss.
  • ExeeLinux Show 18.9 | Mr. Desktop & Mr. Server Ep. 9 – PDisks
    ExeeLinux Show 18.9 | Mr. Desktop & Mr. Server Ep. 9 – PDisks
  • How Kubernetes became the solution for migrating legacy applications
    In 2015, Google released Kubernetes as an open source project. It was an implementation of Google's internal system called Borg. Google and the Linux Foundation created the Cloud-Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) to host Kubernetes (and other cloud-native projects) as an independent project governed by a community around it. Kubernetes quickly became one of the fastest growing open source projects in history, growing to thousands of contributors across dozens of companies and organizations. What makes Kubernetes so incredible is its implementation of Google's own experience with Borg. Nothing beats the scale of Google. Borg launches more than 2-billion containers per week, an average of 3,300 per second. At its peak, it's many, many more. Kubernetes was born in a cauldron of fire, battle-tested and ready for massive workloads.
  • Akraino, a New Linux Foundation Project, Aims to Drive Alignment Around High-Availability Cloud Services for Network Edge
    Akraino will offer users new levels of flexibility to scale edge cloud services quickly, to maximize the applications or subscribers supported on each server, and to help ensure the reliability of systems that must be up at all times. While several open source projects exist to help solve pieces of the puzzle, nothing currently meets the need for an edge infrastructure solution. Integration of existing efforts in this new project will help deliver ease of use, hardened reliability, unique features, and performance for carrier, provider, and IoT networks.
  • Absolute 15.0 Beta 4 released
    Based on Slackware64-current Another beta... with all the kernel updates, glib and such -- trying to make things easier on beta testers :-)
  • State of Wisconsin Investment Board Has $33.92 Million Stake in Red Hat Inc (RHT)

Security: Updates, Nintendo 'Hackers', Microsoft Windows Back Doors, and FlightSimLabs Malware

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Hackers Release Video Of Nintendo Switch Running A Linux Distro
    When it comes to porting software to potentially unsupported devices, hackers are quite comfortable to push themselves beyond the boundaries set by the manufactures.
  • Epidemic of cryptojacking can be traced to escaped NSA superweapon [Ed: It's a Microsoft Windows issue. All versions of Windows (ME onwards) have NSA back doors]
    It all started when the Shadow Brokers dumped a collection of NSA cyberweapons that the NSA had fashioned from unreported bugs in commonly used software, including versions of Windows. The NSA discovered these bugs and then hoarded them, rather than warning the public and/or the manufacturers about them, in order to develop weapons that turned these bugs into attacks that could be used against the NSA's enemies.
  • Flight Sim Company Embeds Malware to Steal Pirates’ Passwords

    Flight sim company FlightSimLabs has found itself in trouble after installing malware onto users' machines as an anti-piracy measure. Code embedded in its A320-X module contained a mechanism for detecting 'pirate' serial numbers distributed on The Pirate Bay, which then triggered a process through which the company stole usernames and passwords from users' web browsers.

Software and Games Leftovers

  • LXD Weekly Status #35
    This past week we’ve been focusing on a number of open pull requests, getting closer to merging improvements to our storage volume handling, unix char/block devices handling and the massive clustering branch that’s been cooking for a while. We’re hoping to see most of those land at some point this coming week. On the LXC side of things, the focus was on bugfixes and cleanups as well as preparing for the removal of the python3 and lua bindings from the main repository. We’re also making good progress on distrobuilder and hope to start moving some of our images to using it as the build tool very soon.
  • Performance Co-Pilot 4.0.0 released
    It gives me great pleasure to announce the first major-numbered PCP release in nine and a half years - PCP v4 - is here!
  • Performance Co-Pilot Sees First Major Version Bump In Nearly A Decade
    The Performance Co-Pilot open-source cross-platform monitoring/visualizing stack has reached version 4.0 as its first major version hike in almost ten years.
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  • Sci-fi mystery 'The Station' has released, it’s a short but memorable experience
    What would happen if we discovered the existence of alien life? A question I've often asked and a question many games, films and books have covered in great detail. The Station [Steam] is a sci-fi mystery that sees you investigate The Espial, a space station sent to research a sentient alien civilization.
  • Halcyon 6: The Precursor Legacy DLC released, some good content for a small price
    Halcyon 6: The Precursor Legacy DLC [GOG, Steam] was released earlier this month, adding some really nice content at a small price to an already great game.
  • Parry and dodge your way to victory in 'Way of the Passive Fist', launching March 6th
    Way of the Passive Fist [Steam, Official Site] is a rather unique and very colourful arcade brawler and it's releasing with Linux support on March 6th.