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Software: Virtlyst 1.2.0, Blender 2.8 Plan, Dropbox Gets Worse and DaVinci Resolve 15 Targets GNU/Linux

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Software
  • Virtlyst 1.2.0 released

    Virtlyst – a Web Interface to manage virtual machines build with Cutelyst/Qt/C++ got a new release.

    This new release includes a bunch of bug fixes, most importantly probably being the ability to warn user before doing important actions to help avoid doing mistakes.

    Most commits came from new contributor René Linder who is also working on a Bootstrap 4 theme and Lukas Steiner created a dockerfile for it. This is especially cool because Virtlyst repository now has 4 authors while Cutelyst which is way older has only 6.

  • Blender 2.8 Planning Update

    At this point we will not have a feature complete Beta release ready in August as we had hoped. Instead, we invested most of our time improving the features that were already there and catching up with the bug tracker. This includes making the viewport and EEVEE work on more graphics cards and platforms.

    The Spring open movie team is also using Blender 2.8 in production, which is helping us ensure the new dependency graph and tools can handle complex production scenes.

  • Blender 2.80 Now Coming In Early 2019 With Many Improvements

    The Blender 3D modeling software is facing a slight set-back in their release schedule for the big Blender 2.80 release, but it's moving along and they intend to have it ready by early next year.

  • Dropbox will only Support the Ext4 File System In Linux in November

    Dropbox has announced that starting on November 7th 2018, only the ext4 file system will be supported in Linux for synchronizing folders in the Dropbox desktop app. Those Linux users who have synch on other file systems such as XFS, ext2, ext3, ZFS, and many others will no longer have working Dropbox synchronization after this date.

    This news came out after Linux dropbox users began seeing notifications stating "Dropbox Will Stop Syncing Ext4 File Systems in November." You can see an example of this alert in Swedish below.

  • Dropbox scares users by shrinking synching options

    Dropbox has quietly announced it will soon stop synching files that reside on drives tended by some filesystems.

    The sync ‘n’ share service’s desktop client has recently produced warnings that the software will stop syncing in November 2018.

    Those warnings were sufficiently ambiguous that Dropbox took to its support forums to explain exactly what’s going on, namely that as of November 7th, 2018, “we’re ending support for Dropbox syncing to drives with certain uncommon file systems.”

  • DaVinci Resolve 15 Video/Effects Editor Released With Linux Support

    DaVinci Resolve 15 has been released by Blackmagic Design as the company's professional-grade video editing, visual effects, motion graphics, and audio post-production software.

GIMP Photo Editor: Fine-Tune Your Images Like Never Before

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GNU
Software

Who doesn’t like to fine-tuning their images and the perfect way for a lot of users is to opt for popular image editing tools. While the count of these offerings is continuing excessively, we are here to talk specifically about GIMP or (the GNU Image Manipulation Program). The free alternative to Adobe Photoshop is no less than its counterparts owing to the set of features it offers to the users.

The professional is there for the users for adding the perfect shades of color, texture, and highlights in the image. It is a tool that you can use for developing your photos from the scratch. Use the tool for professional quality effect and you will have a whole new set of images to flaunt before others.

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Software: libredwg, MPV Player, Colibri, BitTorrent, Vocal, Curl

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Software
  • libredwg-0.6 released [alpha]
  • MPV Player: A Minimalist Video Player for Linux

    VLC is probably the best video player for Linux or any other operating system. I have been using VLC for years and it is still my favorite.

    However, lately, I am more inclined towards minimalist applications with a clean UI. This is how came across MPV. I loved it so much that I added it in the list of best Ubuntu applications.

  • Colibri – A Unique Minimalist Browser Without Tabs

    Today, we’ve got a somewhat non-conventional app for you and depending on how ready you are to jump on a new idea, you might just fall in love with it. This new idea is bundled in the form of Colibri, a browser that was not available for Linux until recently.

    Colibri is a free, proprietary, secure, speed-efficient, and uncluttered browser designed to be unique and compact. Its major selling point is its tabless browsing interface which works with 3 main tabbed sections instead – Links, Lists, and Feeds.

  • The Best Free BitTorrent Clients

    BitTorrent, the company that created the BitTorrent protocol, designed it with the aim of making it easy to distribute large amounts of data effectively. The peer-to-peer (P2P) technology enables each person downloading the data also to serve that data to others (a process called “seeding”). This drastically reduces the load on a single server and has many uses aside from downloading pirated material.

    So really, BitTorrent is merely a protocol—a tool that, in and of itself, is not at all illegal. It’s what you do with it that matters, just like owning a hammer isn’t illegal, but hitting someone over the head with it is. If you’re considering downloading copyrighted content, that’s illegal.

  • Vocal – a modern Vala podcast player

    Vocal is a powerful, fast, and intuitive application that helps users find new podcasts, manage their libraries, and enjoy the best that independent audio and video publishing has to offer.

  • A hundred million cars run curl

    One of my hobbies is to collect information about where curl is used. The following car brands feature devices, infotainment and/or navigation systems that use curl - in one or more of their models.

    These are all brands about which I've found information online (for example curl license information), received photos of or otherwise been handed information by what I consider reliable sources (like involved engineers).

    Do you have curl in a device installed in another car brand?

Proprietary Software on GNU/Linux: Dropbox and VMware Player 14

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GNU
Linux
Software
  • Dropbox makes the cloud rain poop on Linux users

    Cloud storage rules -- especially when coupled with a local backup plan. Quite frankly, it is one of the best computing innovations of all time. How cool is it that you can easily backup important files to an offsite location? Let's be honest -- before the cloud, many computer and smartphone users didn't bother backing up at all. While many still do not, the cloud has definitely improved the situation through convenience and affordability.

  • VMware Player 14 review - Alternate reality

    VMware Workstation Player is a very decent program, especially for new users. It comes with a reasonable set of options, it tries to guess what you're doing and help, and for lightweight use, it makes perfect sense. But if you are an advanced user, you will definitely need and want more, and this is where the full pro version comes into play. Or alternatively, go for other options. Overall, it remains similar to version 4, which I tested several years ago.

    My biggest gripe is not having hardware acceleration, which significantly improves the performance of virtual machines. The network and storage side of things are less critical for everyday use. Multi-VM is also important if you need to create more complicated setups or labs. That said, the program is simple and easy, and has a very gentle curve for people just freshly starting in the virtualization world. Worth testing, but always remember, 'tis but a teaser for the heavyweight just hiding behind the corner. Indeed, for me, the big take from this endeavor is that I need to test the Workstation as well. We shall see.

‘Podcasts’ is a new podcast app for Linux

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Software

A new app makes it easy to follow, fave and listen to your favourite podcasts on the Linux desktop.

It’s called ‘Podcasts’ and — no prizes for guessing — it’s a podcast client for the Linux desktop, designed for the GNOME desktop specifically.

Podcasts lets you subscribe to shows, browse through them, and listen to the latest episodes all from inside the app, with no external MP3 or OGG downloads necessary.

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ClickUp – An Awesome Project Management and Productivity App

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Software

ClickUp is a productivity platform that provides a fundamentally new way to work. More than just task management – ClickUp offers notes, reminders, goals, calendar, scheduling, and even an inbox. Fully customizable, ClickUp works for every type of team, so all teams can use the same app to plan, organize, and collaborate.

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Valve May Soon Release a Native 64-Bit Version of Its Steam for Linux Client

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Linux
Software

Valve is certainly not the last software developer in the world to still offer 32-bit versions of its applications, but as the world kind of moved to 64-bit apps and operating systems, they will be forced to that too very soon.

Apple already forced their hands with the upcoming macOS Mojave 10.14 operating system, which will be available this fall, by deprecating support for 32-bit apps and urging application developers to move to 64-bit apps.

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Software: Security Scanners, Cockpit and Terminalizer

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Software
  • 5 Tools to Scan a Linux Server for Malware and Rootkits

    There are constant level of high attacks and port scans on Linux servers all the time, while a properly configured firewall and regular security system updates adds a extra layer to keep the system safe, but you should also frequently watch if anyone got in. This will also helps to ensure that your server stays free of any program that aims at disrupting its normal operation.

    The tools presented in this article are created for these security scans and they are able to identity Virus, Malwares, Rootkits, and Malicious behaviors. You can use these tools make regularly system scans e.g. every night and mail reports to your email address.

  • Cockpit 175

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 175.

  • Terminalizer - Tool to Record Terminal Sessions on Linux

    Have you ever thought about how you can record your Linux terminal? Terminalizer is a fancy and highly customizable CLI tool that records and renders terminal activity and can make an animated GIF image from it. It can work well on Ubuntu, CentOS, Arch Linux, SUSE, RedHat, Fedora, etc. In this tutorial, we'll take you through how you can install and capture/record your Linux terminal.

    Before installing terminalizer, ensure you have Node.js and npm installed.

Mugshot 0.4.1 Released

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Software

Mugshot 0.4.1, the latest release of the lightweight user profile editor, is now available! This release includes a number of bug fixes and will now run in the most minimal of environments.

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Also:

Applications: Kodi, Qalculate, Kiwi TCMS, DocBook

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Software
  • 8 Best Kodi Repositories For Downloading Popular Addons

    With online streaming becoming popular by the day, there has been a rise in the portals and apps that allow you to stream content in a hassle-free manner. Now, to watch the content from different sources, you would need a centralized media player and this is where Kodi comes into the picture.

    Kodi has been one of the most popular and talked about open source media center and rightly so. The XBMC owned media center allows you to stream all types of content including videos, music, games, etc. on devices running on different platforms.

  • Qalculate! – An Open-Source Multi-Purpose Calculator

    Qalculate! is a robust cross-platform desktop calculator that is simple to use and equally capable of performing complex math calculations as well as other calculative tasks like percentage calculation and currency conversion.

    What is awesome about Qalculate! is that it works with a library that features tons of customizable functions which make it excellent at unit conversions, plotting graphs, interval arithmetic, and symbolic calculations like differentiation, among other math problems.

    Qalculate! is also capable of keeping the history of your calculations, a feature that comes in handy when making lengthy calculations or solving long math problems (typical of Calculus).

    When you launch Qalculate! you will notice its straightforward workflow. It has a typical menu bar with file, edit, and help options. The other options are for setting the mode you want the app to be in while you use it, the variables you will be working with, and the units.

  • Kiwi TCMS 5.2

    We're happy to announce Kiwi TCMS version 5.2! This release introduces new database migrations and converts the Docker image to a non-root user with uid 1001. You may have to adjust ownership/permissions on the kiwi_uploads Docker volume!

  • DocBook – markup language for technical documentation

    DocBook is a semantic markup language for writing structured documents using XML (or SGML). It was originally intended for writing technical documents related to computer hardware and software but it can be used for any other sort of documentation. The language is fairly easy to learn; its strength derives from its flexibility.

    DocBook enables you to author and store document content in a presentation-neutral form that captures the logical structure of the content. The XML files describe the document layout, paragraph division and other attributes. XML file structure may look familiar to HTML code. XML tends to be an improvement over the older HTML specification and can be used to produce complete web pages and other markup documents.

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Mozilla: Firefox GCC/LLVM Clang Dilemma, September 2018 CA Communication and CfP

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Security: Quantum Computing and Cryptography, Time to Rebuild Alpine Linux Docker Container

  • Quantum Computing and Cryptography
    Quantum computing is a new way of computing -- one that could allow humankind to perform computations that are simply impossible using today's computing technologies. It allows for very fast searching, something that would break some of the encryption algorithms we use today. And it allows us to easily factor large numbers, something that would break the RSA cryptosystem for any key length. This is why cryptographers are hard at work designing and analyzing "quantum-resistant" public-key algorithms. Currently, quantum computing is too nascent for cryptographers to be sure of what is secure and what isn't. But even assuming aliens have developed the technology to its full potential, quantum computing doesn't spell the end of the world for cryptography. Symmetric cryptography is easy to make quantum-resistant, and we're working on quantum-resistant public-key algorithms. If public-key cryptography ends up being a temporary anomaly based on our mathematical knowledge and computational ability, we'll still survive. And if some inconceivable alien technology can break all of cryptography, we still can have secrecy based on information theory -- albeit with significant loss of capability. At its core, cryptography relies on the mathematical quirk that some things are easier to do than to undo. Just as it's easier to smash a plate than to glue all the pieces back together, it's much easier to multiply two prime numbers together to obtain one large number than it is to factor that large number back into two prime numbers. Asymmetries of this kind -- one-way functions and trap-door one-way functions -- underlie all of cryptography.
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