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Software

Backup your Linux desktop

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Software
HowTos
  • Backup your Linux desktop with Simple Backup
  • Not So Simple Backup (NSS Backup) suite

5 (More) Best Web eCommerce Software for Linux

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Software

junauza.com: I have already featured here some of the best web eCommerce software available for Linux. However, I've noticed that I left out several other high-quality web e-commerce solutions.

Going Headless

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Software
Ubuntu

theopensourcerer.com: I have one monitor on my desk, quite a nice one, but only one. Right now I want to install Ubuntu Lucid on another desktop I have in the office, but I still want to use my monitor for other stuff (like writing this blog post). No problem, Ubuntu has an accessible installer, I just plug in the speakers and keyboard and go through it with audio, lets see how it goes.

Kiosk in KDE 4

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Software

dev-peterix.blogspot: The original KioskTool for KDE 3 is probably rather well-known compared to the newer KDE 4 port that currently resides in extragear. While the older version is much more complete, even in the first few minutes of use, I encountered segfaults.

Nero brings blue ray disc support to Linux

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Hardware
Software

linusearch.com: Nero Linux 4 brings support for all optical disk including, Blue Ray disc support. The company that produces Nero Linux 4 claims that this is the only product to support blue data laser burning in Linux.

Most Beautiful GNOME Shell Themes Ever!

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Software

techdrivein.com: We saw the quiet evolution of GNOME Shell aka the next generation GNOME desktop environment. Now lets do some GNOME Shell theming.

Tales From the Front: in Search of APT-GET UNDO

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Software

freesoftwaremagazine.com: I am currently in that level of hell reserved for people who upgrade their GNU/Linux system too quickly.

XBMC Camelot - Beautiful, stylish, classy, and fun

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Software

dedoimedo.com: Would you like to transform your television into a powerful media center with Internet connectivity, network sharing, video and music playlists, photo albums, weather forecast, maybe even games? Enter XBMC.

3 Great Linux Radio Apps To Discover Great New Music

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Software

makeuseof.com: Massive MP3 collections are nice, but they don’t do everything. Sometimes you want to discover new music, for example, or listen to the news. Traditionally this was the role of the radio, but if you’re a geek (and if you’re reading this blog I’m betting you are) you’re far more likely to be around computers than FM receivers.

How Much Faster Is Konqueror With WebKit?

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KDE
Software

digitizor.com: Yesterday we wrote about how you can make WebKit default in Konqueror. We always knew that WebKit is going to make Konqueror faster; but how much faster? Today we test.

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today's howtos

Linux Foundation: Juniper/OpenContrail and Bell Canada at Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP)

  • Juniper Expands Contrail, Moves Open-Source Project to the Linux Foundation
    "Fortunately at Juniper we have a secrect weapon and one that i'm so very proud of and that's Contrail," Rami Rahim, Juniper Networks CEO said during his keynote. "The way we have been investing and innovating in Contrail over the last few years is sort of similar to how a car company would invest in a Formula 1 car, it's essentially a proving ground for the world's best technology." Rahim commented that the use-cases for Contrail so far have been somewhat limited, but that's about to change. "The future of Contrail is as a platform, a single controller that can solve a variety of really compelling use-cases with ease and simplicity," Rahim said. "Whether it's management of overlay and underlay, or SD-WAN connectivity, or multi-cloud fabric management." Juniper originally acquired Contrail in December 2012 in a deal valued at $176 million. In September 2013, Juniper open-sourcedthe Contrail technology, creating the OpenContrail project.
  • Juniper Networks' OpenContrail software defined network joins The Linux Foundation
    The Linux Foundation is far more than just Linux. It's also the home of many open-source networking projects such as the software-defined network (SDN) OpenDaylight, Open Platform for Network Function Virtualization (OPNFV), and Open Network Automation Program (ONAP). Now, networking power Juniper Networks has announced that OpenContrail, its open-source network virtualization cloud platform, will join the others as part of The Linux Foundation.
  • Juniper Moves OpenContrail to the Linux Foundation
    Juniper first released its Contrail products as open source in 2013 and built a community around the project. However, many stakeholders complained that Juniper didn’t work very hard to build the community, and some called it “faux-pen source.”
  • Juniper Moves SDN-Based OpenContrail Project to The Linux Foundation
    Juniper Networks today announced the codebase for OpenContrail, its open source network virtualization platform for the cloud, is moving to The Linux Foundation.
  • Bell Canada says open source ONAP adds modularity, flexibility to its network
    Bell Canada has become one of the first service providers to deploy Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP), focusing its initial attention on automating its data center tenant network provisioning process. By making this transition in its network, the service provider said it will provide its operations teams with a new tool to improve efficiency and time to market. This is the first step in using ONAP as a common platform across Bell’s networks on its journey towards a multipartner DevOps model.
  • Bell Canada First to Deploy Open Source ONAP in Production
    Canadian communications provider Bell is the first organization to deploy an open source version of the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) in a production environment. The milestone was noted in a blog post by Arpit Joshipura, general manager of networking and orchestration with the Linux Foundation.

Software: Everdo, GIMP, Notepadqq

  • Everdo – A Todo List and Getting Things Done App for Linux
    Everdo is a modern and beautifully-designed Electron-based task management application with which you can keep track of your work using tags, project folders, smart filters, and schedules. It doesn’t need a cloud account to work so your data will remain save on your PC. Everdo features a modern and minimalist User Interface with an extremely clean, clutter-less, and uniform design in order to enhance speedy and distraction-free productivity.
  • GIMP 2.9.8 Released with On-Canvas Gradient Editing, Better PSD Support
    GIMP 2.9.8 has been released with on-canvas gradient editing, better handling of Adobe Photoshop PSD files, and support for those using GIMP on Wayland.
  • GIMP 2.9.8 Released With On-Canvas Gradient Editing, Wayland Support
    GIMP 2.9.8 has been released as the newest development version of this widely-used, open-source Photoshop-like program in its road to GIMP 2.10. Earlier this week I happened to highlight many of the changes building up for GIMP 2.9.8 as featured in A Lot Of Improvements Are Building Up For GIMP 2.9.8, Including Better Wayland Support.
  • Getting started with the Notepadqq Linux text editor
    I don't do Windows. The operating system, I mean. At least, not on my own computers and not with any of my own work. When I was a consultant, I often had to work out of my clients' offices, which meant using their hardware, which also meant using Windows at many of those offices. Even when using Windows, I tried to install as much open source software as I could. Why? Because it works as well as (if not better than) its proprietary equivalents. One of the applications I always installed was Notepad++, which Opensource.com community moderator Ruth Holloway looked at in 2016.

Getting started with the Notepadqq Linux text editor

I don't do Windows. The operating system, I mean. At least, not on my own computers and not with any of my own work. When I was a consultant, I often had to work out of my clients' offices, which meant using their hardware, which also meant using Windows at many of those offices. Even when using Windows, I tried to install as much open source software as I could. Why? Because it works as well as (if not better than) its proprietary equivalents. One of the applications I always installed was Notepad++, which Opensource.com community moderator Ruth Holloway looked at in 2016. Read more