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Software

Tom's Definitive Linux Software Roundup: Communications Apps

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Software

tomshardware.com: In this segment, we will be focusing on communications applications. While these apps still rely on Internet access to function, their focus is to allow the user to communicate with other individuals using the Internet simply as a transit medium.

coupla file recovery apps

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Software
  • Toolbox: Roadkil's Unstoppable Copier
  • Recover deleted files with Magic Rescue

How To: Virtualize Any OS For Free

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Software
HowTos

gizmodo.com: Syncing your Zune in Mac OS X, running Word in Linux, giving Linux a go within Windows 7: just a few of the things you can do with virtual machines. And setting one up isn't just easy—it's free.

Batch Process Photos with Phatch

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Software

blog.worldlabel.com: Virtually any photo manager out there lets you perform mundane tasks. But even the most powerful applications can’t really help you when you need to perform the same action on dozens or hundreds of photos. For those tasks you need Phatch.

Five handy secure shell tips and tricks

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Software

ghacks.net: I use secure shell a LOT, every day. So much so that I often take for granted how important this tool is. In this article you will learn five different (and handy) secure shell tips to make sure your ssh usage is as good as it can be.

Java: The Good Parts

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Software

kev009.com: When Java first started gaining popularity, it was loudly hyped as the end all language. It was expected that Java would take the “rich client” by storm, and applets would be the go to solution for enhancing web pages. What happened was a bit different.

Conky is a good example of a simple Linux tool

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Software

computoredge.com: Linux (and indeed Unix) has long held the philosophy of "one tool for each job, and one job for each tool." This can lead to quite a paradox for newcomers to Linux: Why are there so many tools that do similar things?

comparing "KDE 4" and "GNOME 3"

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KDE
Software

aseigo.blogspot: There is small trend currently to write a blog entry or article comparing "KDE 4" and "GNOME 3". Now, I'm not involved in the least with the GNOME 3 efforts (no big surprise there, I'm sure) so I can't and won't comment on what they are doing now or in the future (they can do so themselves quite well), but there are two interesting points I keep seeing raised that I really do want to address ...

Tasks and To-Dos with Glista 0.4

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Software

itlure.com: If the memory of humans could be measured in removable media and the best would be a BluRay disc, mine would be somewhere around a floppy. Needless to say, I use my phone's reminder function a lot, especially for important stuff with set deadlines. For other "things-to-do-sometime-in-the-future" I want to use a Task manager application that is as simple as possible.

Scare Up Some Spooky Halloween Fun for Your Computer

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Software

ostatic.com/blog: Even if you're not dressing up in costume this Halloween, you can still get in the spirit of the holiday. Trick out your computer with some creepy skins and plugins or treat yourself to a few ghoulish movies and desktop themes.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

  • Ryan Icculus Gordon On The Linux Action Show
    Ryan Icculus Gordon has just recently been on a guest on the excellent Linux Action Show to talk about Linux gaming. Ryan Icculus Gordon is the name behind a number of big ports, and you can see here just what he has done. Hint: It's a lot.
  • Empire: Total War Looks Close To A Linux Version, Pokes Fun At Linux Gamers
    We already knew that Total War: Rome II would come to Linux which sadly didn't come out when expected early this year, but now it looks like the original Empire: Total War will come to Linux too.
  • Another (Linux) game added to the Humble Jumbo Bundle 2
    - Legend of Grimrock: Old school and modern gaming combines in this thrilling dungeon crawler RPG from Almost Human Games. A group of prisoners are sentenced to certain death by exile to the secluded Mount Grimrock for vile crimes they may or may not have committed. Unbeknownst to their captors, the mountain is riddled with ancient tunnels, dungeons, and tombs built by crumbled civilizations long perished now. If they ever wish to see daylight again and reclaim their freedom, the ragtag group of prisoners must form a team and descend through the mountain, level by level.

Trying Intel OpenCL On Linux For Video Encoding

The open-source x264 program does support OpenCL acceleration -- when building x264 it will check for the presence of OpenCL development support and then at runtime the --opencl switch must be passed for exploiting the potential of any OpenCL hardware. The x264 test profile part of the Phoronix Test Suite is strictly intended for CPU-based testing so this weekend I added a x264-opencl test profile that uses the same revision of x264 and the same media file, but the only difference is that it forces OpenCL support. So now with the Phoronix Test Suite it's as easy as running phoronix-test-suite benchmark x264 x264-opencl to run the CPU-bound x264 and the OpenCL version for easy comparison purposes. Read more

For 50 percent of developers, open source is a 9-to-5 job

As much as we may like the myth of the hobbyist developer, no one codes for free anymore. Well, not quite "no one," but according to Dirk Riehle's recent academic research, at least half of all open-source software is written by paid developers during work hours. And if Linux is any indicator, the percentage of 9-to-5 open-source development is only going to increase over time. Read more

Who's to blame when products fail?

Recently a major publication house published an article about how the Tizen smartphone "flopped – and open source is to blame" [1]. If you did read the article, however, you found that even the author did not really believe open source was "to blame." The author blamed the companies behind the projects for a lack of commitment to the use of Open Source, which created a lack of follow-through and (given the number of alternative closed and partially open operating systems they could use) the final use of either Android or Microsoft instead. Of course, this headline particularly infuriated me because even iOS is based on FreeBSD, and both Android and Firefox OS use kernels "based on" Linux. So, "Open Source Failed"? Read more