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Software

Git 2.25 Released

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Development
Software
  • [ANNOUNCE] Git v2.25.0
    The latest feature release Git v2.25.0 is now available at the
    usual places.  It is comprised of 583 non-merge commits since
    v2.24.0, contributed by 84 people, 32 of which are new faces.
    
    The tarballs are found at:
    
        https://www.kernel.org/pub/software/scm/git/
    
    The following public repositories all have a copy of the 'v2.25.0'
    tag and the 'master' branch that the tag points at:
    
      url = https://kernel.googlesource.com/pub/scm/git/git
      url = git://repo.or.cz/alt-git.git
      url = https://github.com/gitster/git
    
    New contributors whose contributions weren't in v2.24.0 are as follows.
    Welcome to the Git development community!
    
      Ben Keene, Colin Stolley, Dominic Jäger, Erik Chen, Hariom
      Verma, Heba Waly, James Coglan, James Shubin, Johannes Schindelin
      via GitGitGadget, Jonathan Gilbert, Josh Holland, Kazuhiro
      Kato, Łukasz Niemier, Manish Goregaokar, Matthew Rogers,
      Mihail Atanassov, Miriam Rubio, Nathan Stocks, Naveen Nathan,
      Nika Layzell, pan93412, Paul Menzel, Philippe Blain, Prarit
      Bhargava, r.burenkov, Ruud van Asseldonk, ryenus, Slavica
      Đukić, Thomas Menzel, Utsav Shah, Yi-Jyun Pan, and Zoli Szabó.
    
    Returning contributors who helped this release are as follows.
    Thanks for your continued support.
    
      Alban Gruin, Alessandro Menti, Alexander Shopov, Alexandr
      Miloslavskiy, Andreas Schwab, Andrei Rybak, brian m. carlson,
      Christopher Diaz Riveros, Daniel Ferreira, Denis Ovsienko,
      Denton Liu, Derrick Stolee, Dimitriy Ryazantcev, Đoàn Trần
      Công Danh, Ed Maste, Elia Pinto, Elijah Newren, Emily Shaffer,
      Eric Wong, Garima Singh, Hans Jerry Illikainen, Jean-Noël
      Avila, Jeff Hostetler, Jeff King, Jiang Xin, Johannes Berg,
      Johannes Schindelin, Johannes Sixt, Jonathan Nieder, Jonathan
      Tan, Jordi Mas, Junio C Hamano, Kevin Willford, Martin Ågren,
      Matthias Rüster, Mike Hommey, Peter Krefting, Philip Oakley,
      Phillip Wood, Pratyush Yadav, Ralf Thielow, René Scharfe, Robin
      H. Johnson, Rohit Ashiwal, SZEDER Gábor, Tanushree Tumane,
      Taylor Blau, Thomas Braun, Thomas Gummerer, Todd Zullinger,
      Trần Ngọc Quân, and William Baker.
    
  • Git v2.25.0

    Git 2.25 has been released. This blog post looks at "partial clone support" and "sparse checkouts" as these features mature. "A clone of a Git repository copies all of its data: every version of every file in the history.

  • Highlights from Git 2.25

    The open source Git project just released Git 2.25 with features and bug fixes from over 84 contributors, 32 of them new. Here’s our look at some of the most exciting features and changes introduced since Git 2.24.

  • Git 2.25 Released As Its First Update Of 2020

    Git 2.25 is out today with over 500 commits making up this latest feature release.

    The Git distributed revision control system is up to version 2.25 with a variety of changes. There aren't too many notable user-facing changes but a lot of churn internally:

    - The git multi-pack index functionality now can show progress indicators.

Corebird Continuation ‘Cawbird’ Updates with Improvements

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Software

Cawbird is a fork of the Corebird GTK twitter client that continues to work with Twitter on Linux.

Corebird became unsupported after Twitter disabled the streaming API. Cawbird takes up the job to work with the new APIs and includes a few fixes and modifications.

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Software: Melody, OfflineIMAP and LibreOffice Development

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LibO
Software
  • Melody – music player written in Vala

    I’ve written scores of reviews of open source graphical music players. They’ve been a fairly mixed bag. Some music players are genuinely excellent, others fall way short of my (fairly) modest requirements. There’s still a few interesting music players I’ve yet to cover. I’ll try to rectify this in the next few months, although most of my time is currently spent tinkering with the Raspberry Pi 4 (RPI4), which includes penning my weekly blog looking at whether the RPI4 is a capable desktop machine.

    John Denmore of Arizona asked me to look at Melody, software billed as “a music player for listening to local music files, online radios, and Audio CD’s”.

    What intrigued me is that Melody is designed for elementary OS, a distribution based on Ubuntu that focuses mainly on non-technical users. That pretty much describes me. I’ve been meaning to try elementary OS for a while. Before doing so, I’m going to explore some apps designed for it.

  • Keep your email in sync with OfflineIMAP

    Last year, I brought you 19 days of new (to you) productivity tools for 2019. This year, I'm taking a different approach: building an environment that will allow you to be more productive in the new year, using tools you may or may not already be using.

    [...]

    Almost all the tools I've tried (outside of the big mail providers) that work really well with large amounts of mail have one thing in common: they all rely on a local copy of your mail stored in Maildir format. And the most useful tool for that is OfflineIMAP. OfflineIMAP is a Python script that mirrors IMAP mailboxes to a local Maildir folder tree. I use it to create a local copy of my mail and keep it in sync. Most Linux distributions include it, and it is available via Python's pip package manager.

  • Custom label in LibreOffice charts

    There has been some progress in LibreOffice related to custom labels on charts.

    [...]

    LibreOffice is now able to import custom text extracted from an OOXML document and store it in the ODF format. In order to do this, there was no need for extending the ODF structure, because it can already be accomplished using the <chart:data-label> tag. Multiple paragraphs are supported in one label. Apparently, style elements are not yet imported correctly, but the good news is it can be further developed without modifying the ODF format.

Software: CPU and GPU Temperature Software, HomeBank 5.3.1 and Curl With wolfSSH

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Software
  • Command Line Apps to View CPU and GPU Temperature in Linux

    Many Linux distributions ship with applets and widgets to view information about hardware sensors and their respective temperature values. Third party apps like system-monitor extension for GNOME Shell and Psensor also provide graphical frontend to monitor thermal values. As far as command line apps are concerned, only a few exist but they are capable of showing accurate temperature values.

    [...]

    Psutil is a Python module that can look up hardware information, active processes and real time system utilization data. Since Psutil can show a lot of data about your hardware, you can effectively use it as a replacement for multiple command line apps and bash commands that are used separately for retrieving various hardware utilization values.

  • HomeBank 5.3.1

    HomeBank is a free software (as in "free speech" and also as in "free beer") that will assist you to manage your personal accounting. It is designed to easy to use and be able to analyse your personal finance and budget in detail using powerful filtering tools and beautiful charts. If you are looking for a completely free and easy application to manage your personal accounting, budget, finance then HomeBank should be the software of choice.

  • curl even more wolfed

    I’m happy to announce that curl now supports a third SSH library option: wolfSSH. Using this, you can build curl and libcurl to do SFTP transfers in a really small footprint that’s perfectly suitable for embedded systems and others. This goes excellent together with the tiny-curl effort.

    SFTP only

    The initial merge of this functionality only provides SFTP ability and not SCP. There’s really no deeper thoughts behind this other than that the work has been staged and the code is smaller for SFTP-only and it might be that users on these smaller devices are happy with SFTP-only.

    Work on adding SCP support for the wolfSSH backend can be done at a later time if we feel the need. Let me know if you’re one such user!

    Build time selection

    You select which SSH backend to use at build time. When you invoke the configure script, you decide if wolfSSH, libssh2 or libssh is the correct choice for you (and you need to have the correct dev version of the desired library installed).

    The initial SFTP and SCP support was added to curl in November 2006, powered by libssh2 (the first release to ship it was 7.16.1). Support for getting those protocols handled by libssh instead (which is a separate library, they’re just named very similarly) was merged in October 2017.

Photopea – A Web Based Photoshop Alternative for Linux

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Software

The first thing the opensource faithful say is use GIMP. Don’t get me wrong, GIMP is an incredible tool. However, if you have been using Photoshop for 20+ years, the transition to GIMP is painful.

The interface is so much different that my workflow suffers as I hunt for tools. Plus, there is a reason why Photoshop is the industry standard, it just crushes GIMP in feature set and maturity of it’s interface. Digital Trends did a piece on Photoshop vs GIMP that sums this point up nicely.

In my opinion, GIMP is a superb opensource tool, but it is hard to transition to once you have worked with Photoshop for an extended amount of time.

Once the GIMP vs Photoshop conversation fades out, then comes the Wine discussion. Sure you can run a 20 year old version of Photoshop in Wine. Nonetheless, it still runs like #*&$. I have tried several times over the years to get Photoshop running in Wine and have had various degrees of success. The complexity and nuances of getting Photoshop to run correctly in Wine is just too painful. In my opinion this isn’t even an option for the average user.

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AppImageLauncher | AppImage Manager on openSUSE

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Software
Reviews
SUSE

Right of the cuff, I should note that this will work on other Linux distros too, I am just focusing on openSUSE because, that is my jam. I have been using this on openSUSE Tumbleweed as of Snapshot 20200103. It should also work on Leap as of 42 and newer (that means Leap 15.x is good to go, in case there was any question).

The reason this application excites me so is that I use several AppImages on my system. Which ones you may ask? I’ll tell you, xLights, which I use for my Christmas Light display, VirtScreen that I use when I am remote and need to turn my laptop or phone into a second display. This is super handy as it will not only create links in my menu to the AppImages, it will also copy the *.AppImage file into a designated folder, in my case ~/Applicaitons which is the default. At first, I wasn’t sure about it but after noodling it around a bit, I am totally good with it.

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Live Forensics Tools

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Software

Deft/Deft Zero live forensic tool: is an Ubuntu based Linux distribution oriented to computer forensics and evidence harvesting which allows to block writing permissions on hard disks to prevent their modification in the process of recovering evidence. It is open source and live, so there is no need to install it. In the main menu you can access disks utilities from which you can see the storage devices connected.
DEFT contains over 1 GB of free and open source software to afford incidents in Microsoft Windows systems. You can get Deft Zero from http://na.mirror.garr.it/mirrors/deft/zero/.

Santoku live forensic tool: Santoku is a Linux distribution which, additionally to security features includes mobile forensics tools such as firmware flashing, ram, media cards and NAND imaging tools, brute forcing Android encryption, analysing Iphone backups and more. It auto detects connected mobile devices. You can run Santoku live also from a virtual machine with VMware or Virtualbox. Santoku is among the best tools for mobile forensics. You can download Santoku Linux at https://santoku-linux.com, from Lubuntu installations you can run the script https://santoku-linux.com/wp-content/uploads/build.sh_.txt to add Santoku features to your current system.

CAINE live forensic tool: CAINE is another computer forensics Linux live distro, it is among the most popular tools in computer forensics and includes top level forensics tools such as Autopsy, Dcfldd, dc3dd, Ddrescue, Dvdisaster, Exif, Foremost, FileInfo, FiWalk, Fundl 2.0, FKLook, Fod, Fatback, GCalcTool, Geany, Gparted,gtk-recordmydesktop, Galleta, Gtkhash, Guymager, HDSentinel, Hex Editor (Ghex), HFSutils, Libewf, Lnk-parse, lnk.sh, Log2Timeline, liveusb, mork.pl, MC, MD5deep, md5sum, Nautilus Scripts, NBTempo, ntfs-3g, Offset_Brute_Force, Pasco, Photorec, Read_open_xm, Reglookup, Rifiuti, Rifiuti2, Readpst, Scalpel, SQLJuicer, SFDumper 2.2 , SSDeep, Stegbreak, Smartmontools, Shred and more tools.

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Opera 66 Makes it Easier for Users to Reopen Closed Tabs and Access Add-Ons

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Software
Web

Opera Software kicked off 2020 with a new stable release of its cross-platform, Chromium-based Opera web browser for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows platforms.

Opera 66 has been released earlier this week as the latest and greatest version of this Chromium-based web browser, adding various enhancements to the user interface to make it easier for users to access sidebar extensions, as well as to help them more quickly reopen tabs that were closed by accident.

"We have an easy solution for this, one that doesn’t require going to the full history section. When you click the clock icon that takes you to history, your browser will ask if you would like to reopen your recently closed tabs. If you click yes, they will come back as if you had never closed them in the first place," said Opera Software's Joanna Czajka.

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KDE's January 2020 Apps Update

Filed under
KDE
Software

The long-awaited modernized version of KTimeTracker is finally released.
The application is a personal time tracker for busy people which is now
available on Linux, FreeBSD and Windows. Over the course of 2019 it had been
ported to Qt5 and KDE Frameworks after being unmaintained since around 2013.

The new version is also polished and slightly modernised with the most
noticeable new features being the new Task Time Editing dialog and
live preview in the Export dialog as seen in the picture below.

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auto-cpufreq Is A New CPU Speed And Power Optimizer For Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

auto-cpufreq is a new automatic CPU speed and power optimization tool for Linux laptops using Intel CPUs, which aims to "improve battery life without making any compromises".

The tool changes the CPU frequency scaling, governor (switches between performance and powersave, these being the only 2 modes supported by the default intel_pstate scaling driver) and turbo boost status based on the battery state, CPU usage and system load. It can also show some basic system information, monitor the CPU frequency and temperature for each core, system load, and battery state.

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