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Software

Convert Screenshots of Equations into LaTeX Instantly With This Nifty Tool

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Software

Mathpix is a nifty little tool that allows you to take screenshots of complex mathematical equations and instantly converts it into LaTeX editable text.
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Software and HowTos: Rancher, Laverna, gtop, Manuals, KeeWeb and More

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Software
HowTos
  • Rancher Takes on Multicloud Kubernetes Management

    One thing that happens over time is that organizations can end up with multiple deployments in different places, something that is commonly referred to as - multicloud. It's a deployment challenge that Rancher Labs has built it namesake Rancher cloud orchestration platform to help enable.

    [...]

    With the multicloud world, Williams said its critically important to put in place all of the policy and user management that is needed to have a consistent approach across disparate Kubernetes deployments.

    Rancher is now and has always been open source software that is entirely free for any organization to use. Rancher Labs charges for commercial support, which Williams said is a stable and growing business. He said that Rancher Labs has both outbound sales people as well as channel relationships and today has over 200 customers.

    "But that's a pretty small percentage of the total of 10,000 companies use Rancher everyday to run their containers," he said.

    Williams said that Rancher is Kubernetes, with Docker containers and a management plane and it's something that larger organizations really care about once those services are in production.

  • Taking notes with Laverna, a web-based information organizer

    I don’t know anyone who doesn’t take notes. Most of the people I know use an online note-taking application like Evernote, Simplenote, or Google Keep.

    All of those are good tools, but they’re proprietary. And you have to wonder about the privacy of your information—especially in light of Evernote’s great privacy flip-flop of 2016. If you want more control over your notes and your data, you need to turn to an open source tool—preferably one that you can host yourself.

    And there are a number of good open source alternatives to Evernote. One of these is Laverna. Let’s take a look at it.

  • Essential System Tools: gtop – System monitoring dashboard for the terminal

    This is the second in our series of articles highlighting essential system tools. These are small utilities, useful for system administrators as well as regular users of Linux based systems. The series examines both graphical and text based open source utilities.

    We previously covered ps_mem, a really useful memory utility. This time, another console utility is under the spotlight. It’s called gtop.

    gtop is an open source system monitoring utility written in JavaScript. Our Group Test covered alternatives to top. In particular, htop is a remarkable system monitoring tool. gtop receives far less exposure than htop, but deserves more publicity. Why? Let’s see.

  • Good Alternatives To Man Pages Every Linux User Needs To Know

    A man page, acronym of manual page, is a software documentation found in all Unix-like operating systems. Some man pages are short; some are comprehensive. A man page is divided into several parts, organized  with headings for each section, such as NAME, SYNOPSIS, CONFIGURATION, DESCRIPTION, OPTIONS, EXIT STATUS, RETURN VALUE, ERRORS, ENVIRONMENT, FILES, VERSIONS, CONFORMING TO, NOTES, BUGS, EXAMPLE, AUTHORS, and SEE ALSO.

    Sometimes, I find it really time-consuming when I wanted to learn a practical example of a given Unix command using man pages. So, I started to look for some good alternatives to man pages which are focused on mostly examples, skipping all other comprehensive text parts. Thankfully, there are some really good alternatives out there. In this tutorial, we will be discussing 4 alternatives to man pages for Unix-like operating systems.

  • KeeWeb – An Open Source, Cross Platform Password Manager

    If you’ve been using the internet for any amount of time, chances are, you have a lot of accounts on a lot of websites. All of those accounts must have passwords, and you have to remember all those passwords. Either that, or write them down somewhere. Writing down passwords on paper may not be secure, and remembering them won’t be practically possible if you have more than a few passwords. This is why Password Managers have exploded in popularity in the last few years. A password Manager is like a central repository where you store all your passwords for all your accounts, and you lock it with a master password. With this approach, the only thing you need to remember is the Master password.

  • Plasma secrets: Make the desktop remember window position
  • Create a role on the Chef server with a description
  • Cat Command in Linux: Essential and Advanced Examples
  • Fix ‘add-apt-repository command not found’ Error on Ubuntu and Debian
  • How to Customize SSH Settings For Maximum Security
  • Python at the pump: A script for filling your gas tank
  • Linux vdir Command Tutorial for Beginners (8 Examples)
  • Free eBook from Packt - Linux Shell Scripting Cookbook - Third Edition

Software: Krita, scikit-survival, RcppCCTZ, Weblate

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Software
  • Krita October Sprint Day 1

    On Saturday, the first people started to arrive for this autumn’s Krita development sprint. It’s also the last week of the fundraiser: we’re almost at 5 months of bug fixing funded! All in all, 8 people are here: Boudewijn, the maintainer, Dmitry, whose work is being sponsored by the Krita Foundation through this fundraiser, Wolthera, who works on the manual, videos, code, scripting, Ivan, who did the brush vectorization Google Summer of Code project this year, Jouni, who implemented the animation plugin, session management and the reference images tool, Emmet and Eoin who started hacking on Krita a short while ago, and who have worked on the blending color picker and kinetic scrolling.

  • scikit-survival 0.6.0 released

    Today, I released scikit-survival 0.6.0. This release is long overdue and adds support for NumPy 1.14 and pandas up to 0.23. In addition, the new class sksurv.util.Surv makes it easier to construct a structured array from NumPy arrays, lists, or a pandas data frame. The examples below showcase how to create a structured array for the dependent variable.

  • RcppCCTZ 0.2.4

    RcppCCTZ uses Rcpp to bring CCTZ to R. CCTZ is a C++ library for translating between absolute and civil times using the rules of a time zone. In fact, it is two libraries. One for dealing with civil time: human-readable dates and times, and one for converting between between absolute and civil times via time zones. And while CCTZ is made by Google(rs), it is not an official Google product. The RcppCCTZ page has a few usage examples and details. This package was the first CRAN package to use CCTZ; by now at least two others do—but decided in their infinite wisdom to copy the sources yet again into their packages. Sigh.

  • Weblate 3.2

    Weblate 3.2 has been released today. It's fiftieth release of Weblate and also it's release with most fixed issues on GitHub. The most important change is in the background - introduction of Celery to process background tasks. The biggest user visible change is extended translation memory.

AbiWord - A sleeping giant or a dying dinosaur?

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Software

Nine years ago, I reviewed Abiword and loved it. Small, fierce, full of goodies. This frugal, elegant and powerful word processor offered a staggering range of tools and options from a very modest footprint of only about 25 MB, with things like cross-platform support, portable version, Computer Modern fonts, and many other highlights. I've kept using it ever since, especially on my less-capable devices like the Asus eeePC netbook.

It is time for another review. A lot of summers have passed since, LibreOffice was born and became the de-facto workhorse of the open-source office world, with significant improvements in performance and memory footprint, especially in version 5.x onwards. Now, AbiWord had the last stable release two years ago, and it might actually be on its way to retirement, but I still felt I ought to write a fresh review. Let's see what gives.

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Open Source Logging Tools for Linux

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GNU
Linux
Software

If you’re a Linux systems administrator, one of the first tools you will turn to for troubleshooting are log files. These files hold crucial information that can go a long way to help you solve problems affecting your desktops and servers. For many sysadmins (especially those of an old-school sort), nothing beats the command line for checking log files. But for those who’d rather have a more efficient (and possibly modern) approach to troubleshooting, there are plenty of options.

In this article, I’ll highlight a few such tools available for the Linux platform. I won’t be getting into logging tools that might be specific to a certain service (such as Kubernetes or Apache), and instead will focus on tools that work to mine the depths of all that magical information written into /var/log.

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Also: Terminalizer – A Tool To Record Your Terminal And Generate Animated Gif Images

Cozy – A Cool, Little Audiobook Player for Linux

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Software

Cozy is a modern, free, and open-source audiobook player for GNU/Linux distros. Its name is a play on the “cosy” word which describes a thing that gives a feeling of relaxation, warmth, and comfort.

It features a clean UI with icons to toggle functions such as its sleep timer, search, and options menu. What I like most about Cozy its offline feature which allows you to download audiobooks locally to your preferred storage media for playback later.

It also has Mpris integration so you can use your machine’s media control buttons with it and get desktop notifications.

Cozy has been around for almost a year now and it has received a tremendous number of updates since its first release. It was developed on Fedora and is tested under elementaryOS.

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Also: Linux Dialer - Application for handling tel: link and vCard files

Proprietary Software: Network Inventory Management, Shareware and Mainframes

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Software
  • Best Tools for Network Inventory Management (Updated 2018)

    Network Inventory Management collates all network infrastructure data and keeps it up to date, helping to streamline processes that improve operational performance. Network inventory management solutions offer reporting functions, and process modeling to automate work-intensive, back-office processes. With this software the system or network administrator will know what is on their network, how it is configured, and when it changes.

    This type of software puts to pasture the antiquated way of tracking network inventory, dispensing with the horrid spreadsheet or word processing document.

    Network inventory management software reduces time and costs by helping administrators locate information for every day operational issues. With an up-to-date network inventory there is the basis for optimizing devices to fully exhaust their potential and cost-effectively meet your needs. Another benefit offered by using this type of software is that service provisioning is both faster and more accurate. With increased efficiency comes a more accurate overview of the network.

  • Shareware: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

    Shareware software had a simple premise: You could try the application and if you liked it, you paid for it.

    In those halcyon days, the PC software market was still getting its traction. Most programs were expensive—a single application often retailed for $495, in 1980s dollars. Often, they were complex and difficult to use. Then, Jim "Button" Knopf, creator of PC-File, a simple flat database, and Andrew Fluegelman, inventor of the program PC-Talk, a modem interface program, came up with the same idea: share their programs with other users for a voluntary, nominal payment. Knopf and Fluegelman supported each other’s efforts, and a new software marketing and sales model was born.

  • ANZ slashes mainframe bill with CPU monitoring [Ed: IBM still all about proprietary at the core]
  • Play 1,785 Classic Arcade Games Right Now on The Internet Archive (No Quarters Necessary)

    Arcades, in most cities, are a distant memory, but you can relive over a thousand classic games right now thanks to The Internet Archive.

    The site, which aims to preserve our digital past, offers a massive collection of emulated arcade titles, which you can play here (via OpenCulture.com). The collection currently includes 1,785 games, all emulated right in your browser.

Korkut – Quick and Simple Image Processing at the Terminal

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Software

Korkut is a simple, free and open-source command-line application for processing images. You can use it to modify photos by resizing, cropping, rotating, and converting to other file formats such as PDF, Bitmap, TIFF, etc. You can also use it to add watermarks to images.

Korkut may seem too simple but it is powerful and has multiple options every step of the way.

When you launch the app, it asks you for your input type and its path, as well as the path that you want to export your edited image. Next, it lists the file types present in your selected directory, asks which of them you want to process and then whether you want to select them by prefix or suffix.

It is at this point that its range of editing options become available to you and the options go on.

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Also: Kontact loves Flatpak

Audacity 2.3.0 Released

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Software
  • Audacity 2.3.0 Released

    We are still compiling Audacity as 32-bit. Whilst MacOSX works with 32-bit, it would prefer a 64-bit version of Audacity. We are working on a 64-bit version for Mac for 2.3.1. On Windows you may find that recording is disabled until you change Windows permissions for the microphone! This affects all versions of Audacity, and many other audio programs.

  • Audacity 2.3.0 Released with Punch & Roll Recording, Better Save Options

    Audacity 2.3.0 features a stack of improvements, and benefits from over 90 bugs fixes.

    This is the first major update to the open-source audio tool since the release of Audacity 2.2.2 back in February.

Software, Fonts, Themes, and Icons

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Software
  • Customize Linux Touchpad Gestures with ‘Gestures’ App

    If you want to set-up touchpad gestures on Linux, but don’t know how, you should check out the following app.

    The app is called ‘Gestures’ and is described by its developer as being a “minimal Gtk+ GUI app for libinput-gestures”.

    Windows and macOS both come with a variety of useful touchpad gestures pre-configured out of the box, and offer easy-to-access settings for adjusting or changing gesture behaviour to your liking.

  • MkDocs is the Perfect Open Source Documentation Software

    Whether you are a professional software developer looking for a platform to create elegant documentation for one of you projects, or someone working in a company in need to create an internal documentation for staff, or even just a power user who wants to save some notes in a good fashioned way, MkDocs is the best tool for you.

    MkDocs is a static site generator which is oriented at creating documentation platforms. It’s quite simple, beautiful and easy to configure and deploy. Written in Python, it simply requires you to create your files in Markdown format, and then, just using a single YAML configuration file, it can generate a working static website out of it for you.

  • New version of Culmus (Hebrew) fonts released

    < Many popular Linux distributions have Culmus packages in their repositories. Whether they update those packages during a release cycle and how quickly they adopt new version varies widely from distribution to distribution. /blockquote>

  • Mugricons: These Icons Seems To Fit With Any Kind Of Theme

    You may have your favorite icon theme installed on Linux desktop right now but here is the new icon pack "Mugricons". It is released just few days ago under license GNU General Public License V3, this icon pack borrowed some icons from three icon sets that are: Archdroid, Zafiro and Adwaita.

  • Qogir Theme Pack Looks Fantastic on Linux Desktop

    Some people prefer to use flat design themes, if you are then we present you this theme pack "Qogir". It is based on Arc theme and targets GTK3 and GTK2 based desktop environments. You can install and apply this theme pack, if you are running any of these desktop environments: Gnome, Gnome Shell, Cinnamon, Xfce, Mate, Budgie etc.

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Security Leftovers

Ubuntu Mir's EGMDE Desktop Getting Experimental XWayland

Ubuntu's little known EGMDE example Mir desktop that is mostly a proving grounds for Mir development is now receiving support for XWayland for being able to run X11 applications within this example environment. Lead Mir developer Alan Griffiths posted about initial XWayland support for EGMDE but that it is "highly experimental, and can crash the desktop." This support is available via the "edge" EGMDE Snap. Read more

Devices: Coreboot, Toradex and Digi, Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+

  • Another Micro-ATX Haswell Era Motherboard Working With Coreboot But Needs Tiny Blob
    There are many Sandy Bridge era motherboards that have been freed by Coreboot while if you are looking for more options on something (slightly) newer, a micro-ATX Haswell-era motherboard from ASRock now works under this open-source BIOS implementation. The ASRock H81M-HDS is the latest motherboard port now mainline in Coreboot. The ASRock H81M-HDS supports Haswell Core and Xeon CPUs, supports two DDR3/DDR3L DIMMs, one PCI Express x16 slot, onboard display outputs, four SATA ports, and multiple USB3/USB2 ports. This motherboard can be found refurbished still from some Internet shops for about $70 USD.
  • Toradex and Digi launch i.MX8X-based Colibri and ConnectCore COMs
    Toradex and Digi have released Linux-friendly i.MX8X-based modules via early access programs. The Colibri iMX8X and Digi ConnectCore 8X each provide WiFi-ac and Bluetooth 4.2. NXP’s i.MX8X SoC has made quite a splash this week. Eight months after Phytec announced an i.MX8X-based phyCORE-i.MX 8X module, Variscite unveiled a VAR-SOM-MX8X module and then Congatec followed up with the Qseven form-factor Conga-QMX8X and SMARC 2.0 Conga-SMX8X. Now Toradex and Digi are beginning shipments of i.MX8X based modules for early access customers.
  • New Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ launched for only $25

Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome: Net Neutrality Stance, Mozilla, a VR Work, Firefox Monitor and 5 Best Chrome Extensions For Productivity

  • Mozilla Fights On For Net Neutrality
    Mozilla took the next step today in the fight to defend the web and consumers from the FCC’s attack on an open internet. Together with other petitioners, Mozilla filed our reply brief in our case challenging the FCC’s elimination of critical net neutrality protections that require internet providers to treat all online traffic equally. The fight for net neutrality, while not a new one, is an important one. We filed this case because we believe that the internet works best when people control for themselves what they see and do online. The FCC’s removal of net neutrality rules is not only bad for consumers, it is also unlawful. The protections in place were the product of years of deliberation and careful fact-finding that proved the need to protect consumers, who often have little or no choice of internet provider. The FCC is simply not permitted to arbitrarily change its mind about those protections based on little or no evidence. It is also not permitted to ignore its duty to promote competition and protect the public interest. And yet, the FCC’s dismantling of the net neutrality rules unlawfully removes long standing rules that have ensured the internet provides a voice for everyone. Meanwhile, the FCC’s defenses of its actions and the supporting arguments of large cable and telco company ISPs, who have come to the FCC’s aid, are misguided at best. They mischaracterize the internet’s technical structure as well as the FCC’s mandate to advance internet access, and they ignore clear evidence that there is little competition among ISPs. They repeatedly contradict themselves and have even introduced new justifications not outlined in the FCC’s original decision to repeal net neutrality protections.
  • Virtual meeting rooms don’t have to be boring. We challenge you to design better ones!
    Mozilla’s mission is to make the Internet a global public resource, open and accessible to all, including innovators, content creators, and builders on the web. VR is changing the very future of web interaction, so advancing it is crucial to Mozilla’s mission. That was the initial idea behind Hubs by Mozilla, a VR interaction platform launched in April 2018 that lets you meet and talk to your friends, colleagues, partners, and customers in a shared 360-environment using just a browser, on any device from head-mounted displays like HTC Vive to 2D devices like laptops and mobile phones. Since then, the Mozilla VR team has kept integrating new and exciting features to the Hubs experience: the ability bring videos, images, documents, and even 3D models into Hubs by simply pasting a link. In early October, two more useful features were added: drawing and photo uploads.
  • New Raspbian Update, Qt Creator 4.8 Beta2 Released, Firefox Monitor Now Available in More Than 26 Languages, Chrome OS Linux Soon Will Have Access to Downloads Folder and Canonical Extends Ubuntu 18.04 Long-Term Support
    Firefox Monitor, the free services that tells you whether your email has been part of a security breach, is now available in more than 26 languages: "Albanian, Traditional and Simplified Chinese, Czech, Dutch, English (Canadian), French, Frisian, German, Hungarian, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Malay, Portuguese (Brazil), Portuguese (Portugal), Russian, Slovak, Slovenian, Spanish (Argentina, Mexico, and Spain), Swedish, Turkish, Ukranian and Welsh." Along with this, Mozilla also announced that it has added "a notification to our Firefox Quantum browser that alerts desktop users when they visit a site that has had a recently reported data breach". See the Mozilla blog for details.
  • 5 Best Chrome Extensions For Productivity That You Should Use In 2019
    Google is the most popular browser around and supports a vast number of extensions as well. Since there are a lot of Chrome addons available in the Chrome Web Store, picking the best Google Chrome extension can be quite a task. Also, it is quite easy to get distracted on the web and lose track of time. Thankfully, several good extensions for productivity are available that can help you focus on your tasks, save time by prioritizing them and skillfully manage your to-do list. So here is a list of excellent Google Chrome extensions for productivity for the year 2019 that will assist you in your work in.