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Software

Pitivi Development Updates

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Development
Software
Movies
  • Writing a freesound plugin for Pitivi

    I always say that my first geeky passion is computer programming. But that is a passion I developed about 8 years ago. Another geeky passion I have recently developed has been security analysis. Because of this reason I started a Youtube channel the previous year called “Inversor Moderno” (“Modern investor” in English). Besides the fact that I prefer to follow the fundamental analysis and to be more specific the “value investing” philosophy, I started the channel with the purpose of leaning and teaching more about investments and specifically about quantitative trading. However, it has been a long time since the last time I uploaded a video.

    [...]

    I am still not sure if I should use a GtkListBox or if a GtkTreeView would look better. Also I don’t know what message should be shown when no result is found after searching and also what message to show when the Freesound library window is open for the first time.

  • [GSoC 2018] Welcome Window Integration in Pitivi – Conclusion

    In my last post (link), I talked about integrating “Search” and “Remove” feature in Pitivi’s welcome window. Search feature allowed for easy browsing of recent projects and remove feature allowed removing project(s) from recent projects list.

    In this post, I want to introduce “Project Thumbnails”. I have successfully integrated project thumbnails in recent projects list. This is the last task under issue 1302.

    The main idea behind thumbnails is to give the user a hint what a certain project is about. This can be seen as information in addition to project name and uri which helps to identify the desired project faster and more easily.

Kiwi TCMS 5.0

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Software

We're happy to announce Kiwi TCMS and tcms-api version 5.0! This release introduces object history tracking, removal of old functionality and unused code, lots of internal updates and bug fixes.

The new kiwitcms/kiwi:latest docker image has Image ID 468de0abe8a8. https://demo.kiwitcms.org has also been updated!

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Graphical Abstinence, Living the Terminal Life

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Software
Ubuntu

In today’s modern world of multi-gigabyte browser based applications we can get overwhelmed by busy, interrupting graphical environments. Sometimes it’s nice to downsize and focus, VT100-style. So let’s leverage the power of the terminal to get stuff done with a selection of apps, utilities and a couple of games for your Linux console.

You can stay up to date with our editorial picks by following Snapcraft on Facebook where we share three new and interesting snaps a week. We’d also love to hear what your favourite snaps are, perhaps you’ve found something we’ve missed. Let us know!

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The Most Used Essential Linux Applications

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Software

2018 has been an awesome year for a lot of applications, especially those that are both free and open source. And while various Linux distributions come with a number of default apps, users are free to take them out and use any of the free or paid alternatives of their choice.

Today, we bring you a list of Linux applications that have been able to make it to users’ Linux installations almost all the time despite the butt-load of other alternatives.

To simply put, any app on this list is among the most used in its category, and if you haven’t already tried it out you are probably missing out. Enjoy!

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Brian Kernighan Remembers the Origins of ‘grep’

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GNU
Software

This month saw the release of a fascinating oral history, in which 76-year-old Brian Kernighan remembers the origins of the Unix command grep.

Kernighan is already a legend in the world of Unix — recognized as the man who coined the term Unix back in 1970. His last initial also became the “k” in awk — and the “K” when people cite the iconic 1978 “K&R book” about C programming. The original Unix Programmer’s Manual calls Kernighan an “expositor par excellence,” and since 2000 he’s been a computer science professor at Princeton University — after 30 years at the historic Computing Science Research Center at Bell Laboratories.

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Software: Music Tagger MusicBrainz, Pulseaudio, COPR, AV1

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Software
  • Music Tagger MusicBrainz Picard 2.0 Ported To Python 3 And PyQt5, Brings Improved UI And More

    MusicBrainz Picard version 2.0 was released after more than 6 years since the previous major release (1.0). The new version was ported to Python 3 and PyQt5 and includes Retina and HiDPI support, improved UI and performance, as well as numerous bug fixes.

    [...]

    MusicBrainz Picard 2.0 was ported to Python 3 (requires at least version 3.5) and PyQt5 (>= 5.7). The release announcement mentions that a side effect of this is that "Picard should look better and in general feel more responsive". Also, many encoding-related bugs were fixed with the transition to Python 3, like the major issue of not supporting non-UTF8 filenames.

  • Pulseaudio: the more things change, the more they stay the same

    Such a classic Linux story.

    For a video I'll be showing during tonight's planetarium presentation (Sextants, Stars, and Satellites: Celestial Navigation Through the Ages, for anyone in the Los Alamos area), I wanted to get HDMI audio working from my laptop, running Debian Stretch. I'd done that once before on this laptop (HDMI Presentation Setup Part I and Part II) so I had some instructions to follow; but while aplay -l showed the HDMI audio device, aplay -D plughw:0,3 didn't play anything and alsamixer and alsamixergui only showed two devices, not the long list of devices I was used to seeing.

    Web searches related to Linux HDMI audio all pointed to pulseaudio, which I don't use, and I was having trouble finding anything for plain ALSA without pulse. In the old days, removing pulseaudio used to be the cure for practically every Linux audio problem. But I thought to myself, It's been a couple years since I actually tried pulse, and people have told me it's better now. And it would be a relief to have pulseaudio working so things like Firefox would Just Work. Maybe I should try installing it and see what happens.

  • 4 cool new projects to try in COPR for July 2018

    COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by Fedora infrastructure or signed by the project. However, it can be a neat way to try new or experimental software.

    Here’s a set of new and interesting projects in COPR.

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: AV1

    Open source supporters and companies are teaming up to offer the next general of video delivery. The Alliance for Open Media (AOMEDIA) is made up of companies like Mozilla, Google, Cisco, Amazon and Netflix, and on a mission to create an open video format and new codec called AV1.

    In a blog post about the AOMedia Video, or AV1, video codec, Mozilla technical writer Judy DeMocker laid out the numbers; within the next few years, video is expected to account for over 80 percent of Internet traffic. And unbeknownst to many, all of that free, high-quality video content we’ve come to expect all across the Internet costs quite a bit for the people providing it via codec licensing fees. The most common, H.264, is used all over the place to provide the compression required to send video quickly and with quality intact.

  •  

Convert video using Handbrake

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Software
Movies

Recently, when my son asked me to digitally convert some old DVDs of his high school basketball games, I immediately knew I would use Handbrake. It is an open source package that has all the tools necessary to easily convert video into formats that can be played on MacOS, Windows, Linux, iOS, Android, and other platforms.

Handbrake is open source and distributable under the GPLv2 license. It's easy to install on MacOS, Windows, and Linux, including both Fedora and Ubuntu. In Linux, once it's installed, it can be launched from the command line with $ handbrake or selected from the graphical user interface. (In my case, that is GNOME 3.)

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Wine 3.13

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Software

Software: Remote Access, EncryptPad, Aria2 WebUI, Qbs

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Software
  • Best Linux remote desktop clients of 2018

    This article has been fully updated, and was provided to TechRadar by Linux Format, the number one magazine to boost your knowledge on Linux, open source developments, distro releases and much more. It appeared in issue 220, published February 2017. Subscribe to the print or digital version of Linux Format here.

    SSH has been the staple remote access tool for system administrators from day one. Admins use SSH to mount remote directories, backup remote servers, spring-clean remote databases, and even forward X11 connections. The popularity of single-board computers, such as the Raspberry Pi, has introduced SSH into the parlance of everyday desktop users as well.

    While SSH is useful for securely accessing one-off applications, it’s usually overkill, especially if you aren’t concerned about the network’s security. There are times when you need to remotely access the complete desktop session rather than just a single application. You may want to guide the person on the other end through installing software or want to tweak settings on a Windows machine from the comfort of your Linux desktop yourself.

  • EncryptPad: Encrypted Text Editor For Your Secrets

    EncryptPad is a simple, free and open source text editor that encrypts saved text files and allows protecting them with passwords, key files, or both. It's available on Windows, macOS, and Linux.

    The application comes with a GUI as well as a command line interface, and it also offers a tool for encrypting and decrypting binary files.

  • Aria2 WebUI: Clean Web Frontend for aria2

    Aria2 WebUI is an open source web frontend for aria2. The software bills itself as the finest interface to interact with aria2. That’s a lofty goal considering the competition from the likes of uGet Download Manager (which offers an aria2 plugin).

    Aria2 WebUI started as part of the GSOC program 2012. But a lot has changed since the software’s creation under that initiative. While the pace of development has lessened considerably in recent years, the software has not been abandoned.

  • qbs 1.12 released

    We are happy to announce version 1.12.0 of the Qbs build tool.

    [...]

    All command descriptions now list the product name to which the generated artifact belongs. This is particularly helpful for larger projects where several products contain files of the same name, or even use the same source file.

    The vcs module no longer requires a repository to create the header file. If the project is not in a repository, then the VCS_REPO_STATE macro will evaluate to a placeholder string.

    It is now possible to generate Makefiles from Qbs projects. While it is unlikely that complex Qbs projects are completely representable in the Makefile format, this feature might still be helpful for debugging purposes.

Software: Latte Dock, Emacs, Ick, REAPER

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Software
  • Latte Dock 0.8 Released with Widget Separators, Setup Sharing, More

    A new version of Latte Dock, an icon-based task bar for the KDE desktop, is available to download.

    Latte Dock 0.8 is the first stable release of the app switching software in almost a year and is the third stable release overall.

  • 3 Emacs modes for taking notes

    No matter what line of work you're in, it's inevitable you have to take a few notes. Often, more than a few. If you're like many people in this day and age, you take your notes digitally.

    Open source enthusiasts have a variety of options for jotting down their ideas, thoughts, and research in electronic format. You might use a web-based tool. You might go for a desktop application. Or, you might turn to the command line.

    If you use Emacs, that wonderful operating system disguised as a text editor, there are modes that can help you take notes more efficiently. Let's look at three of them.

  • Ick version 0.53 released: CI engine

    I have just made a new release of ick, my CI system. The new version number is 0.53, and a summary of the changes is below. The source code is pushed to my git server (git.liw.fi), and Debian packages to my APT repository (code.liw.fi/debian). See https://ick.liw.fi/download/ for instructions.

  • REAPER 5.93 Brings New Linux-Native Builds

    Since 2016 we have been looking forward to the REAPER digital audio workstation software for Linux while with this week's v5.93 release, the experimental Linux-native builds are now officially available.

  • Digital Audio Workstation REAPER Adds Experimental Native Linux Builds

    REAPER, a popular music production tool, added experimental native Linux builds to its download page with the latest 5.93 release.

    Initially released in 2005, REAPER (Rapid Environment for Audio Production, Engineering, and Recording) is a powerful digital audio workstation (DAW) and MIDI sequencer, available for Windows, macOS and Linux. Cockos, the company that develops REAPER, was founded by Justin Frankel of Winamp and Gnutella peer-to-peer network fame.

    The application uses a proprietary license and you can evaluate it for free for 60 days without having to provide any personal details or register. After the free trial ends, you can continue to use it but a nag screen will show up for a few seconds when the application starts. A license costs $225 for commercial use, or $60 for a discounted license (details here).

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Today in Techrights

Security Leftovers

  • The Internet of Torts

    Rebecca Crootof at Balkinization has two interesting posts:

    • Introducing the Internet of Torts, in which she describes "how IoT devices empower companies at the expense of consumers and how extant law shields industry from liability."
    • Accountability for the Internet of Torts, in which she discusses "how new products liability law and fiduciary duties could be used to rectify this new power imbalance and ensure that IoT companies are held accountable for the harms they foreseeably cause.

    Below the fold, some commentary on both.

  • Password Analyst Says QAnon’s ‘Codes’ Are Consistent With Random Typing

    “The funny thing about people is that even when we type random stuff we tend to have a signature. This guy, for example, likes to have his hand on the ends of each side of the keyboard (e.g., 1,2,3 and 7,8,9) and alternate,” Burnett wrote in his thread.

  • Uber taps former NSA official to head security team

    Olsen, who served as the counterterrorism head under President Obama until 2014, will replace Joe Sullivan as the ride-hailing company's top security official.

    Sullivan was fired by Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi over his handling of a massive cyber breach last year that happened during former CEO Travis Kalanick’s tenure.

  • Malware has no trouble hiding and bypassing macOS user warnings

    With the ability to generate synthetic clicks, an attack, for example, could dismiss many of Apple's privacy-related security prompts. On recent versions of macOS, Apple has added a confirmation window that requires users to click an OK button before an installed app can access geolocation, contacts, or calendar information stored on the Mac. Apple engineers added the requirement to act as a secondary safeguard. Even if a machine was infected by malware, the thinking went, the malicious app wouldn’t be able to copy this sensitive data without the owner’s explicit permission.

  • Caesars Palace not-so-Praetorian guards intimidate DEF CON goers with searches [Updated]
  • Amazon Echo turned into snooping device by Chinese hackers [sic]

    Cybersecurity boffins from Chinese firm Tencent's Blade security research team exploited various vulnerabilities they found in the Echo smart speaker to eventually coax it into becoming an eavesdropping device.