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9 Best Free Linux Fractal Tools

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Software
Sci/Tech

A fractal is a geometric shape or quantity which displays self-similarity and non-integer dimension. The property of self-similarity applies where a self-similar object is exactly or approximately similar to a part of itself. If you zoom in on any part of a fractal, you find the same amount of detail as before. It does not simplify.

There are many mathematical structures that are fractals including the Koch snowflake, Peano curve, Sierpinski triangle, Lorenz attractor, and the Mandelbrot set. Fractals also describe many real-world objects, such as crystals, mountain ranges, clouds, river networks, blood vessels, turbulence, and coastlines, that do not correspond to simple geometric shapes.

Fractals are rooted in chaos theory, and because of their nature they are perfect for organic looking artwork and landscapes.

Fractal-generating software is any computer program that generates images of fractals. Linux has a great selection of fractal software to choose from.

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7 Useful Alternatives to the Top Utility

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Software

The top utility will need little introduction to seasoned Linux users. top is a small utility that offers a dynamic real-time view of a running system. It allows users to monitor the processes that are running on a system. top has two main sections, with the first showing general system information such as the amount of time the system has been up, load averages, the number of running and sleeping tasks, as well as information on memory and swap usage. The second main section displays an ordered list of processes and their process ID number, the user who owns the process, the amount of resources the process is consuming (processor and memory), as well as the running time of that process. Some versions of top offer extensive customization of the display, such as choice of columns or sorting method.

top is a very popular utility. It helps with system administration by identifying users and processes that are hogging the system. It is also useful for non-system administrators, helping to track and kill errant processes. However, top is showing its age and there are a bunch of utilities that offer a more feature-laden alternative. The purpose of this article is to identify alternatives to top that offer more control in managing processes on a running system.

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The Best Weather Apps for Ubuntu & Linux Mint

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Software
Ubuntu

I obsessively check the weather forecast wherever I happen to be, and using a desktop weather app saves me time and effort while doing this.

It’s delightfully easy to find out the local weather for today, tomorrow and/or next week from the comfort of the Linux desktop, without needing to open a web browser.

And with snow flurries sweeping across Europe, the UK and the USA in recent weeks, chances are you’re checking the weather more than usual, too.

Below is a selection of the best weather apps available to install on Linux. All are free and readily available.

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Also: Linux Mint 19.2 could come with new boot and splash screens

Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #119

Flameshot is an Amazing Screenshot Tool

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Software

If you are someone who depends on saving screenshots a lot in your work, then you would find the default screenshoot tools on Linux (Such as GNOME Screenshot, Kscreenshot..) very limited to your own daily needs. Those tools do not come with any features other than just taking a screenshot for some parts of the screen. Luckily, there’s a tool called Flameshot to solve this issue.

Flameshot is a cross-platform, free and open-source tool to take screenshots with many built-in features to save you time. The main feature you would like in it is that it allows you directly to edit the screenshot you took; You can add blur effects, texts, shapes & arrows with all the colors you want just directly after you take it. This doesn’t happen in a new window, but rather on the desktop where you tool the picture itself.

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Also: Kiwi TCMS 6.4

10 Best Team Viewer Alternatives for Linux in 2019

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GNU
Linux
Software

In a recent article, I covered The Best Open Source Software in 2018 (Users’ Choice). Today, I’m covering the best remote desktop access clients for Linux.

TeamViewer is proprietary multi-platform software that enables users to control computers remotely and enjoy other features like desktop sharing, web conferencing, file transfer, and online meetings.

In the true spirit of open source, there are a thousand and one similar software options that are just as good, thus, here is my list of the 10 best TeamViewer alternatives of 2019 for Linux users.

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Shortwave – GTK3 internet radio software

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Software
GNOME

I recently explored the virtues of odio, a cross-platform radio streaming software that pulls 20,000 stations from a community database, radio-browser.info. Sadly, odio is not released under an open source license, although its developer is considering reviewing the position.

If you’ve a strong commitment to using open source software, is there a good alternative to odio? Step forward Shortwave, a quirky name for software that streams radio stations over the net. Like odio, Shortwave uses the radio-browser.info community database.

Shortwave was previously known as Gradio. Shortwave is its latest reincarnation. Whereas Gradio was written in the Vala programming language, Shortwave is a rewrite in the Rust programming language.

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Software: Terminalizer, OpenVPN, and MIDI/Music on GNU/Linux

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  • Terminalizer – Record Your Linux Terminal and Generate Animated GIF

    Terminalizer is a free, open source, simple, highly customizable and cross-platform program to record your Linux terminal session and generate animated gif images or share a web player.

    It comes with custom: window frames, fonts, colors, styles with CSS; supports watermark; allows you to edit frames and adjust delays before rendering. It also supports rendering of images with texts on them as opposed to capturing your screen which offers better quality.

  • OpenVPN 3 Linux Client Moving Closer To Release As A Big Update

    While many are looking forward to the day when WireGuard support is mainlined within the Linux kernel and declared as stable and widely supported as a next-gen secure VPN tunnel, for those making use of OpenVPN currently, the OpenVPN 3 Linux client has been taking shape as a big step forward on the OpenVPN front.

  • Hubert Figuiere: Music, Flathub and Qt

    I have started reading recently about music theory and such, with the purpose to try to learn music (again). This lead me to look at music software, and what we have on Linux.

    I found a tutorial by Ted Felix on Linux and MIDI

    I quickly realised that trying these apps on my Dell XPS 13 was really an adventure, mostly because of HiDPI (the high DPI screen that the PS 13 has). Lot of the applications found on Fedora, by default, don't support high DPI and a thus quasi impossible to use out of the box. Some of it is fixable easily, some of it with a bit more effort and some, we need to try harder.

Software: wlc 1.0, Lightweight GUI Email Clients and MicroK8s

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Software
  • wlc 1.0

    wlc 1.0, a command line utility for Weblate, has been just released. The most important change is marking this stable and releasing actual 1.0. It has been around long enough to indicate it's stability.

  • Lightweight GUI Email Clients

    Email remains the killer information and communications technology. Email volume shows no sign of diminishing, despite the increasing popularity of collaborative messaging tools.

    Messages are exchanged between hosts using the Simple Mail Transfer Protocol with software programs called mail transfer agents, and delivered to a mail store by programs called mail delivery agents, frequently referred to as email clients.

    Email clients offer a variety of features. Many email clients offer a slew of features, some stick with just the basics. At the end of the day, what is important is that you find an email client that offers what you need, it is reliable, and works well on your computer. Thunderbird is widely regarded as an exceptional open source desktop email client, especially on Linux. It is highly customizable, has a rich set of features, and is geared for both novices and professional users. My only real disaffection with Thunderbird is that it can feel a bit sluggish on inexpensive hardware. If you are looking for an alternative first-rate graphical email client that works with limited system resources, you have come to the right place.

  • MicroK8s, Part 2: How To Monitor and Manage Kubernetes

10 Best CAD Software for Linux

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Software

Computer-aided design (CAD) involves the process of using computers to create, modify, analyses, or optimize designs.

CAD software is used by architects, animators, graphic designers, and engineers to create and perfect their design quality, create a database for maintenance, and improve communication via documentation.

There are several free and paid CAD software to choose from and these days both the free and paid ones have the same features. Thus, the topic of today’s article.

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Software: KTechLab, dracut, Fwupd and More

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Software
  • Announcing KTechLab 0.40.1

    I’m happy to announce KTechLab release version 0.40.1. KTechLab is an IDE for microcontrollers and electronics. In this new release every user-visible functionality is the same as in previous releases, however, the codebase of KTechLab has been updated, so now it is a pure KDELibs4 and Qt4 application and it does not depend anymore on kde3support and qt3support libraries.

    This release should compile and run on systems where kde3support or qt3support libraries are not available.

    In its current state KTechLab’s codebase is ready to be ported to KDE Frameworks 5 (KF5) and Qt5. So a future release of KTechLab could only depend on modern libraries like KF5 and Qt5.

  • dracut problems fixed and a new FAI version

    Before preparing a new FAI release, I had to debug a nasty boot problem in FAI. Booting a FAI CD on a notebooks only hang when no ethernet cable was connected. This was strange, because the automatic installation does not need a network connection and gets all packages from the installation media.

    Since FAI is using dracut (a replacement for initramfs-tools) and we use the kernel cmdline option rd.neednet, dracut only boots if it can set up at least one ethernet device. Without using this option, dracut does not activate the network at all and FAI cannot configure the /etc/network/interface. There's no option to tell dracut just to try to activate network device, but do not rely on being successful. In the end the fix was to edit a dracut script, so dracut does not wait forever for devices to come up. It was just a simple sed -e 's/exit 1/exit 0/'. Nice.

  • ATA/ATAPI Support in fwupd

    A few vendors have been testing the NVMe firmware update code, and so far so good; soon we should have three more storage vendors moving firmware to stable. A couple of vendors also wanted to use the hdparm binary to update SATA hardware that’s not using the NVMe specification.

  • Fwupd Gaining Support For ATA Device Microcode Updates

    Richard Hughes of Red Hat continues on his conquest for improving the Linux firmware updating experience: his latest accomplishment is getting support for microcode updates on ATA/ATAPI drives into Fwupd.

  • The Best Linux Terminal Color Schemes For 2019

    Terminal customization has become a fairly big hobby for Linux users. There are plenty of ways to spice up the Linux terminal and make it look modern and visually appealing. It’s not just for appearances either. A well thought out color scheme can help reduce eye strain and make working in the terminal a much more enjoyable experience.

  • Firefox 65 Released with Major Security Improvements

    Firefox 65 is now available to download.

    The latest stable release of Mozilla’s hugely influential open-source web browser comes bearing a number of improvements, particularly in regards to security and web compatibility.

  • Optimizing Notepad++ on Linux

    I really like Notepad++. I think it's the best, most convenient text editor around, with a simple interface, tons of useful commands and options, and a wealth of lovely plugins, all of which transform a simple text pad into a powerful, flexible document processor. Whether you're working on notes, Web pages or complex software code, Notepad++ does it all. There's only one problem - it's a Windows application.

    In my Slimbook & Kubuntu reports, I remarked on the shortcomings of different text editors in Linux, all of which pushed me to using Notepad++ on Linux, something I tried to avoid. Now, Notepad++ does not run natively on Linux, so I had to use WINE, and this introduced a whole bunch of other complications. HD scaling in Plasma is tricky for WINE software (and in general, for various compatibility reasons), and you need custom tweaks to get a shortcut icon pinned to the Plasma task manager. In this guide, I'd like to highlight a few tricks you can use to make Notepad++ look and behave beautifully in Linux.

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Software: 14 Excellent Free Plotting Tools and Texinfo 6.6

  • 14 Excellent Free Plotting Tools
    A plotting tool is computer software which helps to analyze and visualize data, often of a scientific nature. Using this type of software, users can generate plots of functions, data and data fits. Software of this nature typically includes additional functionality, such as data analysis functions including curve fitting. A good plotting tool is very important for generating professional looking graphics for inclusion in academic papers. However, plotting tools are not just useful for academics, engineers, and scientists. Many users will need to plot graphs for other purposes such as presentations. Fortunately, Linux is well endowed with plotting software. There are some heavyweight commercial Linux applications which include plotting functionality. These include MATLAB, Maple, and Mathematica. Without access to their source code, you have limited understanding of how the software functions, and how to change it. The license costs are also very expensive. And we are fervent advocates of open source software. The purpose of this article is to help promote open source plotting tools that are available. To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of 14 excellent plotting tools. Many of the applications are very mature. For example, gnuplot has been in development since the mid-1980s. The choice of plotting software may depend on which programming language you prefer. For example, if your leaning towards Python, matplotlib is an ideal candidate as it’s written in, and designed specifically for Python. Whereas, if you’re keen on the R programming language, you’ll probably prefer ggplot2, which is one of the most popular R packages. With good reason, it offers a powerful model of graphics that removes a lot of the difficulty in making complex multi-players graphics. R does come with “base graphics” which are the traditional plotting functions distributed with R. But gpplot2 takes graphics to the next level.
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  • [GNU] Texinfo 6.6 released
    We have released version 6.6 of Texinfo, the GNU documentation format.

Bare-Metal Kubernetes Servers and SUSE Servers

  • The Rise of Bare-Metal Kubernetes Servers
    While most instances of Kubernetes today are deployed on virtual machines running in the cloud or on-premises, there is a growing number of instances of Kubernetes being deployed on bare-metal servers. The two primary reasons for opting to deploy Kubernetes on a bare- metal server over a virtual machine usually are performance and reliance on hardware accelerators. In the first instance, an application deployed at the network edge might be too latency-sensitive to tolerate the overhead created by a virtual machine. AT&T, for example, is working with Mirantis to deploy Kubernetes on bare-metal servers to drive 5G wireless networking services.
  • If companies can run SAP on Linux, they can run any application on it: Ronald de Jong
    "We have had multiple situations with respect to security breaches in the last couple of years, albeit all the open source companies worked together to address the instances. As the source code is freely available even if something goes wrong, SUSE work closely with open source software vendors to mitigate the risk", Ronald de Jong, President of -Sales, SUSE said in an interview with ET CIO.
  • SUSE Public Cloud Image Life-cycle
    It has been a while since we published the original image life-cycle guidelines SUSE Image Life Cycle for Public Cloud Deployments. Much has been learned since, technology has progressed, and the life-cycle of products has changed. Therefore, it is time to refresh things, update our guidance, and clarify items that have led to questions over the years. This new document serves as the guideline going forward starting February 15th, 2019 and supersedes the original guideline. Any images with a date stamp later than v20190215 fall under the new guideline. The same basic principal as in the original guideline applies, the image life-cycle is aligned with the product life-cycle of the product in the image. Meaning a SLES image generally aligns with the SUSE Linux Enterprise Server life-cycle and a SUSE Manager image generally aligns with the SUSE Manager life-cycle.

Steam's Slipping Grip and Release of Wine-Staging 4.2

  • Steam's iron grip on PC gaming is probably over even if the Epic Games Store fails
     

    It doesn’t matter though. Whether Epic succeeds or not, Steam has already lost. The days of Valve’s de facto monopoly are over, and all that matters is what comes next.

  • Wine-Staging 4.2 Released - Now Less Than 800 Patches Atop Upstream Wine
    Wine 4.2 debuted on Friday and now the latest Wine-Staging release is available that continues carrying hundreds of extra patches re-based atop upstream Wine to provide various experimental/testing fixes and other feature additions not yet ready for mainline Wine.  Wine-Staging for a while has been carrying above 800 patches and at times even above 900, but with Wine-Staging 4.2 they have now managed to strike below the 800 patch level. It's not that they are dropping patches, but a lot of the Wine-Staging work has now been deemed ready for mainline and thus merged to the upstream code-base. A number of patches around the Windows Codecs, NTDLL, BCrypt, WineD3D, and other patches have been mainlined thus now coming in at a 798 patch delta.