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Software

Announce: OpenSSH 6.7 released

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OS
Software
BSD

OpenSSH is a 100% complete SSH protocol version 1.3, 1.5 and 2.0 implementation and includes sftp client and server support.

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man-pages-3.74 is released

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Software

I've released man-pages-3.74. The release tarball is available on kernel.org. The browsable online pages can be found on man7.org. The Git repository for man-pages is available on kernel.org.

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Leftovers: Software

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Software

Excellent Subtitle Editors

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Software

A subtitle editor is a type of computer software that lets users create and edit subtitles. These subtitles are superimposed over, and synchronized with, video. Subtitles can literally make the difference between being immersed in a movie or only watching the screen, trying to keep up with developments. Good subtitling does not distract but actually enhances viewing pleasure, and even native speakers can find subtitles useful, not only where the individual is hearing-impaired.

A subtitle is a text representation of the dialog, narration, music, or sound effects in a video file. Subtitles are available in multiple formats.

Mangled subtitles can anger viewers. Fortunately, there is a good range of open source software that lets you make subtitles with Linux. These editors help you preview how the subtitles appear on the video, and listen to the dialog. Additionally, they offer the ability to make entering and editing text easy, with good control over text formatting and positioning.

The software featured in this article also offer an easy way to perform a number of different editing jobs, besides adding and removing subtitles. They each boast a good feature set, and are all released under an open source license.

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QupZilla 1.8 Web Browser Looks Just Too Beautiful [Review & Ubuntu Installation]

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Software

QupZilla is a relatively new WebKit-based web browser written in Qt, which makes it perfect for KDE users. QupZilla looks just great, and it seems to be a perfect browser for those users who prefer a more different approach when it comes to the interface look and feel. QupZilla stands out with an interface that doesn’t resemble neither of the ‘modern’ ones like Firefox, Chrome or Opera, but rather keeps a classic look, which I believe may fit many users out there. So let’s see what this impressive browser is all about.

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XBMC Successor, Kodi 14.0 "Helix" Alpha 4, Might Be the Best Release Yet

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Software

The latest stable stable release for XBMC is 13.2 and this is the final branch of the application with that name. The developers have been working for quite some time on the replacement, and, from the looks of it, they are getting closer with each new version.

XBMC stands for Xbox Media Center and it was a time when that name made sense. It's been many years since the software no longer performs this specific function, so it's understandable why the makers of this project would want to change the name. The decision was made a long time ago, so the Linux community should find it easy to adapt.

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Leftovers: Software

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Software

Leftovers: Software

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Software

15 years of whois

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Software
Web
Debian

Exactly 15 years ago I uploaded to Debian the first release of my whois client.

At the end of 1999 the United States Government forced Network Solutions, at the time the only registrar for the .com, .net and .org top level domains, to split their functions in a registry and a registrar and to and allow competing registrars to operate.

Since then, two whois queries are needed to access the data for a domain in a TLD operating with a thin registry model: first one to the registry to find out which registrar was used to register the domain, and then one the registrar to actually get the data.

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Leftovers: Software

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Software
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China starts Windows wipe-out, switches to Linux

China is presently in a situation to completely eradicate Windows from the country. Though this is not immediately possible, the map to wipe-out the Windows operating system from every computer is planned over a period of a few years from now. According to a report on SoftPedia, China has planned to move away from Microsoft Windows completely. Recently, China had announced the ban of Windows 8 in the country accusing Microsoft of spying the China government and businesses via the operating system. China has made it mandatory to all organizations to switch from the Microsoft Windows operating system to a locally developed operating system based on Linux. China believes that by the year 2020, they will successfully eradicate Windows and would have an already switched to a more powerful and secure operating system of their own. Read more

Simplicity Linux 14.10 is now available to download!

Simplicity Linux 14.10 is now available for everyone to download. It uses the 3.15.4 kernel. Netbook and Desktop Editions both use LXDE as the desktop environment, and X Edition uses KDE 4.12.3. The download links are as follows: Read more

Free-software pioneer says it's all about liberty

When it comes to code that runs a computer or a program, Richard Stallman believes it should be free. Not only at no cost to the user, but unshackled and independent. To Stallman, it is a matter of liberty, not price. “We say free software as in ‘free speech’ not ‘free beer,’” Stallman said. The computer programmer and activist shared his views, which earned him the MacArthur “Genius Grant,” during a presentation at Weber State University on Thursday. Read more

Samsung fires another shot at Microsoft in Android patent battle

This move came as no surprise to lawyers who've been following the case. One intellectual property (IP) attorney whose firm is covering the case closely said that Samsung is simply adding another argument to their contention that their existing Microsoft Android patent deal is invalid on business contract grounds. According to Reuters, Samsung said it agreed to pay Microsoft Android patent license royalties in 2011, but the deal also stated that Samsung would develop Windows phones and share confidential business information with Microsoft. If Samsung were to sell a certain number of Windows phones, then Microsoft would reduce the Android royalty payments. Read more