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Software

Kdenlive 19.08.1 released

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KDE
Software
Movies

The first minor release of the 19.08 series is out with usability fixes.

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Hyper – terminal emulator built with web technologies

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Software

One of the reasons why I became hooked on Linux was the command line. The command line offers advantages day-to-day because of facets like its scalability, scriptability, simple design, and simple interface. At the command line, there’s so much power at my fingertips. Its continuing flexibility and power remain big draws to this day.

It’s true that some people consider the command line to be arcane and obsolete. They prefer graphical interfaces. And for non-technical people and beginners, few dispute good graphical user interfaces make life easier. But who doesn’t want the best of both worlds?

The power of the command line can be accessed on the desktop by using a terminal emulator. The terminal window allows the user to access a console and all its applications such as command line interfaces (CLI) and text user interface software. Even with sophisticated modern desktop environments packed with administrative tools, other utilities, and productivity software all sporting attractive graphical user interfaces, it remains the case that some tasks are best undertaken with the command line.

The terminal emulator is a venerable but essential tool for everyone using the command line. There are so many terminal emulators available for Linux that the choice is, frankly, bamboozling.

This article looks at Hyper, one of the newer terminal emulators available. It’s built with web technologies – JavaScript, HTML, CSS. The goal of the project is to create a beautiful and extensible experience for command-line interface users, built on open web standards. Hyper is based on xterm.js, a front-end component written in TypeScript.

Hyper is cross-platform support running on Linux, macOS, and Windows. It boasts that it’s fully extensible. Let’s see how it fares.

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Albert – An amazing keyboard launcher for Linux

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Software

Linux has many features and tools that make the user experience very convenient and rich. There are regular updates, a very enthusiastic community that supports you out at every step. In the same quest, today we will learn about an amazing tool called Albert. It is basically a keyboard launcher. Now you may ask, what is a keyboard launcher?

Keyboard launcher is an application that allows you to do things from the keyboard which you normally have to carry out with a mouse. Having one makes your interaction with your computer very easy and quick.

Now, you may be saying, “are you talking about keyboard shortcuts because I already know that”. My replay to this question is, Naah!

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What is TLDR and Explained How to Use it

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Software
HowTos

Linux command line users must be familiar with "man" command. It stands for manual pages, which means that every Linux command or utility comes with the set of instructions or possible usage of the command. Man pages are of great help while working on the command line, but often, the documentation available via man pages is too lengthy or too confusing to learn. It also does not provide any real life examples too. All it include is the details of what that particular command does, and what are its available switches ( also called options ).

TLDR (Too Long Didn’t Read) is a community driven efforts to improve default Linux man pages, it provides an easy to under documentation for every command or utility and it also demonstrates the usage of the command with pretty simple examples. In this article, we will be learning the process to install TLDR and how to use it to work better on Linux terminals.

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5 of the Best Linux Writing Tools

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GNU
Linux
Software

Writing is not an easy task, and therefore any assistance provided by a useful app can be very much appreciated, and even totally relied upon. The apps included here needed to satisfy only three criteria to make it to this list: they had to be compatible for Linux, they had to be a writing tool but not a word processing app, and they had to be great.

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Software: Cockpit, Curl and syslog-ng

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Software
  • Cockpit 202

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 202.

  • Daniel Stenberg: FIPS ready with curl

    It should show that it uses wolfSSL and that all the protocols and features you want are enabled and present. If not, iterate until it does!

  • Peter Czanik: Handling lists in syslog-ng: the in-list() filter

    Recently, a number of quite complex configurations came up while syslog-ng users were asking for advice. Some of these configurations were even pushing the limits of syslog-ng (regarding the maximum number of configuration objects). As it turned out, these configurations could be significantly simplified using the in-list() filter, one of syslog-ng’s lesser known features.

    First, a bit of history. The idea of the in-list() filter came to me while I was listening to Xavier Mertens at a Libre Software Meeting conference talk in France. In his talk, he described how to check log messages for suspicious IP addresses. He used free IP address lists from the Internet (spammer IP addresses, malware command and control IP addresses, etc.) and, using a batch process, he kept checking if any of those were present in the log messages on a nightly basis.

    It occurred to me that all of the above could be done in real-time. Namely, several different parsers capable of extracting IP addresses and other important information from log messages as they arrive are already available in syslog-ng. All that was missing was a tool that could compare the extracted value with a list of values coming from a file. This tool was implemented quickly as a ‘spare time project’ by one of my colleagues. This is how the in-list() filter was born.

DRM, Games With DRM, and Proprietary Software

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Software
Gaming
  • Cory Doctorow: DRM Broke Its Promise

    Streaming services do depend on DRM: DRM is how Spotify stops third parties from making play­ers that skip ads, and it’s how Netflix and Amazon Prime stop you from saving its Christmas movies to your hard-drive in July so you can watch them for free in December, when they become pay-per-view movies.

    There’s a name for societies where a small elite own property and everyone else rents that prop­erty from them: it’s called feudalism. DRM never delivered a world of flexible consumer choice, but it was never supposed to. Instead, twenty years on, DRM is revealed to be exactly what we feared: an oligarchic gambit to end property ownership for the people, who become tenants in the fields of greedy, confiscatory tech and media companies, whose in­ventiveness is not devoted to marvelous new market propositions, but, rather, to new ways to coerce us into spending more for less.

  • The Humble RPG Bundle seems like a really great deal for Linux gamers

    In the mood for some new games? Well Humble Bundle are back again for your monies, this time with The Humble RPG Bundle.

  • A little look over ProtonDB reports for Steam Play in August 2019

    Another month has come and go and so ProtonDB, the super handy unofficial tracker for Steam Play compatibility ratings has released another data dump.

    Looking to get started with Steam Play? Be sure to check our previous beginners guide.

    Once again, here's a quick look over some points shown in the data. August had a total of 3,848 reports sent in with ProtonDB showing a total of 56,345 reports overall. From that, ProtonDB is currently reporting 6,129 "games work" which ProtonDB base on those with at least one gold rating or higher.

  •                    

    Tesla owners are complaining that they were locked out of their cars and left 'stranded' after the app stopped working

20 Best Drone and Robot Software for Linux: The Professionals Choice

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GNU
Linux
Software

Linux is enriched with a lot of drone and robot software. This industry is entirely linked with Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning, which needs a different kind of expertise and creativity. Since the new era of technology has emerged, it started to be a vital part mostly in the scientific research area. Also, this kind of stuff is not cheap to build and control. So, deciding on a particular product is fishy enough, even if you are experienced in this industry.

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Kubeflow and Proprietary Software

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Software
  • Kubeflow – Data Science on Steroids

    Artificial intelligence, machine and deep learning are probably the most hyped topics in software development these days!
    New projects, problem solving approaches and corresponding start-ups pop up in the wild on a daily basis. Most of the time, the major target is to get an understandable output from a huge set of unmanageable input data. To achieve this goal, the in fact standard frameworks TensorFlow and PyTorch established a rich set of features over time by being well maintained under the hood, too. But the simple usage of these frameworks does not solve today’s software related challenges like continuous integration (CI) and deployment (CD). The creation of a sustainable workflow, which embeds seamlessly into the existing infrastructure as well as existing CI/CD pipelines, are one of the major obstacles software developers are facing today.
    Another trend related to this topic is the increasing usage of Kubernetes as build and test infrastructure for on premise and managed cluster architectures. But how to utilize the full power of Kubernetes-based cloud environments, when it comes to training and deploying machine learning models? How to integrate them into existing continuous integration and deployment pipelines? Can we split up machine learning workflows into separate pipeline steps, like we already do within our existing CI/CD setups?

  • Multi-Calendar Desktop App MineTime 1.6.0 Adds New Scheduling Assistant

    MineTime, an AI-powered desktop calendar application that works with multiple Calendar services, has been updated to version 1.6.0, which includes some important changes like a new scheduling assistant, a new 10-day view, and more.

  • Short Topix: Dropbox Reinstates Support For ZFS, XFS, Btrfs, eCryptFS

    On July 18, 2019, Google announced in a blog post that it was closing a loophole that allowed sites to know if a user was connecting to a site using "incognito" mode on Google Chrome. Some sites would not allow users to connect to their sites using incognito mode. Granted, some users used incognito mode, where browsing history and cookies are not saved, to circumvent article limits and paywalls. In 2017, The Boston Globe started blocking users of incognito mode from accessing its content. The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Dallas Morning News and others have also employed the method that prevents users of incognito mode from accessing the content on their sites.

  • Microsoft Edge will ditch Flash in 2020

    IN 2017 FLASH, the comically buggy building block of web media, revealed it would be committing a very slow suicide, eventually losing all support in 2020. Given the amount of security holes it had when it was fully supported by Adobe, this could very well be seen as a mercy killing.

    Google Chrome promptly put the boot in, disabling Flash from Chrome 76 by default to try and wean people off it, before the final death in 2020. And now Microsoft has clarified that it'll be putting its own little kick into Adobe as well by following much the same schedule for Edge.

Best Compression Software for Linux

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Software

Every administrator or user will use file compression to save disk space and to move data easily. Nowadays, this utility is the bread and butter of system administrators to send data via the Internet, reducing the overall file size, saving time and internet bandwidth.

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