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Software

Audacity 2.3.0 Released

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Software
  • Audacity 2.3.0 Released

    We are still compiling Audacity as 32-bit. Whilst MacOSX works with 32-bit, it would prefer a 64-bit version of Audacity. We are working on a 64-bit version for Mac for 2.3.1. On Windows you may find that recording is disabled until you change Windows permissions for the microphone! This affects all versions of Audacity, and many other audio programs.

  • Audacity 2.3.0 Released with Punch & Roll Recording, Better Save Options

    Audacity 2.3.0 features a stack of improvements, and benefits from over 90 bugs fixes.

    This is the first major update to the open-source audio tool since the release of Audacity 2.2.2 back in February.

Software, Fonts, Themes, and Icons

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Software
  • Customize Linux Touchpad Gestures with ‘Gestures’ App

    If you want to set-up touchpad gestures on Linux, but don’t know how, you should check out the following app.

    The app is called ‘Gestures’ and is described by its developer as being a “minimal Gtk+ GUI app for libinput-gestures”.

    Windows and macOS both come with a variety of useful touchpad gestures pre-configured out of the box, and offer easy-to-access settings for adjusting or changing gesture behaviour to your liking.

  • MkDocs is the Perfect Open Source Documentation Software

    Whether you are a professional software developer looking for a platform to create elegant documentation for one of you projects, or someone working in a company in need to create an internal documentation for staff, or even just a power user who wants to save some notes in a good fashioned way, MkDocs is the best tool for you.

    MkDocs is a static site generator which is oriented at creating documentation platforms. It’s quite simple, beautiful and easy to configure and deploy. Written in Python, it simply requires you to create your files in Markdown format, and then, just using a single YAML configuration file, it can generate a working static website out of it for you.

  • New version of Culmus (Hebrew) fonts released

    < Many popular Linux distributions have Culmus packages in their repositories. Whether they update those packages during a release cycle and how quickly they adopt new version varies widely from distribution to distribution. /blockquote>

  • Mugricons: These Icons Seems To Fit With Any Kind Of Theme

    You may have your favorite icon theme installed on Linux desktop right now but here is the new icon pack "Mugricons". It is released just few days ago under license GNU General Public License V3, this icon pack borrowed some icons from three icon sets that are: Archdroid, Zafiro and Adwaita.

  • Qogir Theme Pack Looks Fantastic on Linux Desktop

    Some people prefer to use flat design themes, if you are then we present you this theme pack "Qogir". It is based on Arc theme and targets GTK3 and GTK2 based desktop environments. You can install and apply this theme pack, if you are running any of these desktop environments: Gnome, Gnome Shell, Cinnamon, Xfce, Mate, Budgie etc.

Software: Cozy, Editors, and pyRenamer

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Software
  • Cozy is a Cozy Little Audiobook Player for Linux

    Audiobooks are a great way to consume literature. Many people who don’t have time to read, choose to listen. Most people, myself included, just use a regular media player like VLC or MPV for listening to audiobooks on Linux.

    Today, we will look at a Linux application built solely for listening to audiobooks.

  • Offline WYSIWYG in 2018 - A dying breed

    Once upon a time, visual HTML editors were all the rage. You would open a browser-like program and just type your pages, without thinking too much about the source code, the scripts, or even the looks. The magic happened somewhere behind the scenes. Then, slowly but surely, online CMS started showing up, and eventually became the modern norm. But what if you still want to write Web stuff offline?

    It does sound a bit like a paradox - after all, you WILL be uploading your material one day. Still, being able to write in an offline manner has its perks and convenience. Moreover, if you do not use any CMS, writing pure HTML can be tedious. Having a nice frontend helps you focus on what you want people to read, not necessarily what machines ought to be interpretting and displaying. The question is, how difficult is this to achieve in the year 2018?

  • pyRenamer: Bulk Renaming Made Easy

    Renaming files in batches is a rare task. Probably, that is why, with the exception of Xfce’s Thunar, desktop file managers can only rename files one at a time. However, when I digitize music, I am dealing with ten or more files per albums, and I need a bulk renamer. Of course, I could use the rename command, and, using it four or fives a week, I would soon get to know the options I wanted. However, for such a repetitive task, a desktop tool is more convenient. It was with this need that I rediscovered pyRenamer for the second or third time. As I quickly remembered, it is by far the most versatile of all the alternatives.

    As the name suggests, pyRenamer is written in Python, and offers most of the options of the rename command. It comes with only brief online help embeeded in the interface, but, aside from a few obscure features, is easy enough to figure out by trial and error. By default, the interface consists of a directory manager on the top left, and a pane on the top right for the files in the currently selected directory. On the bottom left are the options for renaming, and on the bottom right the controls. Users can also choose to select View | Show Options to add an option pane on the top right. The options include such useful functions, as automatically preserving file name extensions and showing a preview of the selected renaming options. The Options pane can also be used to enter regular expressions to limit the file names that are bout to be renamed.

Open source tools I used to write my latest book

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Software

I first used and contributed to Free software and open source software in 1993, and since then I've been an open source software developer and evangelist. I've written or contributed to dozens of open source software projects, although the one that I'll be remembered for is the FreeDOS Project, an open source implementation of the DOS operating system.

I recently wrote a book about FreeDOS. Using FreeDOS is my celebration of the 24th anniversary of FreeDOS. This is a collection of how-tos about installing and using FreeDOS, essays about my favorite DOS applications, and quick-reference guides to the DOS command line and DOS batch programming. I've been working on this book for the last few months, with the help of a great professional editor.

Using FreeDOS is available under the Creative Commons Attribution (cc-by) International Public License. You can download the EPUB and PDF versions at no charge from the FreeDOS e-books website. (There's also a print version, for those who prefer a bound copy.)

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Tomb – A File Encryption and Personal Backup Tool for Linux

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Software
Security

Tomb is a free open source, small, powerful and simple tool for encrypting files on GNU/Linux. At the time of this writing, it comprises of a shell script (zsh) using generic filesystem GNU tools and the Linux kernel crypto API (cryptsetup and LUKS).

It also employs various GNU/Linux tools such as steghide, lsof, mlocate, resizefs, dcfld and many more, to extend its functionality.

Tomb is used to create secure backups of secret or personal files in encrypted, password-protected directories called tombs. These directories can only be opened using their associated keyfiles and passwords.

After creating a tomb, you can store its key files separately, for example your tomb file can exist on a remote server while the key file is on your laptop or desktop at home or in office. If the tomb file is on your laptop or desktop, you can hide it within the filesystem or as a more secure option, store the key in a USB drive.

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Wine: Wine 3.17 and Steam Play/Proton Update

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Software
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 3.17 is now available.

  • Wine 3.17 Brings Better Shell Auto-Completion Support, Bug Fixes

    Wine 3.17 is out today as the latest bi-weekly development update to this increasingly popular way of running Windows games and applications on Linux.

    Wine 3.17 isn't the most exciting update of recent releases, but does bring better auto-completion support to its shell, more of the OPC Services have been implemented, improvements to the Pager common control, and a total of 36 known bug fixes.

  • There's another Wine development release out today with version 3.17

    Wine development continues the rapid advancements with another biweekly release giving us Wine 3.17 today.

  • Valve have pushed out a new Steam Play beta with DXVK 0.80 and more

    As expected, Valve have pushed out an update to Proton for their Steam Play system with a new beta version.

    [...]

    The upgrade to DXVK alone should bring much better game compatibility, considering the amount of improvements that has gone into it since Steam Play only had DXVK 0.70 before.

    I'm hoping the fullscreen improvements will stop the issue I had with DOOM from happening again, where on a two monitor setup it gave me a tiny screen on the wrong monitor.

10 Best Linux Educational Software for Your Kids

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Software

The apps that we cover are usually ones for professionals, hobbyists, students, etc – mostly adults. But children use computers too, in fact, now more than ever, and the awesome Linux platform has a variety of software to keep them engaged and learning things.

Today, we bring you the 15 best Linux educational software for kids.

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Taskbook – Command Line-Based Tasks, Boards, and Notes

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Software

Taskbook is a simple, free, open-source, command line-based utility app for creating and managing notes and tasks across multiple boards.

It uses a minimal syntax and being security conscious, automically saves all your data to the storage to avoid corruption or sharing with unpermitted parties. By default, the data is stored in JSON file at ~/.taskbook/storage.

When items are deleted, they are automatically archived so that you can peruse them or restore them anytime you want.

Taskbook keeps track of your completed tasks and indicates it in the form of percentage at the bottom of the terminal. It further breaks down the information to indicate how many tasks are done, pending, and your notes count.

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Software and Games: Hegemon, Gift of Parthax, Lutris

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Software
Gaming
  • Hegemon – A Modular System Monitor Application Written In Rust

    When it comes to monitor running processes in Unix-like systems, the most commonly used applications are top and htop, which is an enhanced version of top. My personal favorite is htop. However, the developers are releasing few alternatives to these applications every now and then. One such alternative to top and htop utilities is Hegemon. It is a modular system monitor application written using Rust programming language.

  • Wizard arena-fighter 'Gift of Parthax' is now officially out on Linux

    Announced yesterday after a pretty short beta period, the magical arena fighting game Gift of Parthax is now officially available for Linux. Along with putting the Linux build out in public, their latest release also fixes a few bugs.

    The developer sent over a key and I've been testing it, the Linux version seems to be working really quite nicely. If you liked the idea of Wizard of Legend, but found it a little too fast for your tastes then Gift of Parthax might be a better fit although it's single-player only.

  • Lutris 0.4.20 is now out, to help you manage all your games plus some Overwatch testing

    I have to admit, the game manager Lutris [Official Site] has come along quite a bit since I last used it. Today, version 0.4.20 was made available.

    For those not aware of it, Lutris is an application that aims to give you a single place to manage all your games on Linux. It supports native games, Wine, various emulators and so on. The application itself is available under the GPL and the helper scripts to install games can be viewed before using them so it's quite nice.

CPod – A Simple, Beautiful And Cross-platform Podcast App

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Software

Podcasts have become very popular in the last few years. Podcasts are what’s called “infotainment”, they are generally light-hearted, but they generally give you valuable information. Podcasts have blown up in the last few years, and if you like something, chances are there is a podcast about it. There are a lot of podcast players out there for the Linux desktop, but if you want something that is visually beautiful, has slick animations, and works on every platform, there aren’t a lot of alternatives to CPod. CPod (formerly known as Cumulonimbus) is an open source and slickest podcast app that works on Linux, MacOS and Windows.

CPod runs on something called Electron – a tool that allows developers to build cross-platform (E.g Windows, MacOs and Linux) desktop GUI applications. In this brief guide, we will be discussing – how to install and use CPod podcast app in Linux.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat: OpenShift and Awards

  • OpenShift Commons Briefing: OpenShift 3.11 Release Update with Scott McCarty (Red Hat)
    In this briefing, Red Hat’s Scott McCarty and numerous other members of the OpenShift Product Management team gave an in-depth look at Red Hat’s OpenShift’s latest release 3.11 and some insights in to the road ahead.
  • Awards roll call: Red Hat awards, June to October 2018
    Depending on the weather in your region, it’s safe to say that the seasons are changing so it’s a good time to look back at what was a busy few months for Red Hat, especially when it came to industry awards for our technical and product leadership. In recent months, Red Hat products and technologies took home twenty awards, highlighting the breadth and depth of our product portfolio as well as the expertise that we provide to our customers. In addition, Red Hat as a company won five awards recognizing its growth and culture as a leader in the industry.
  • More advice from a judge - what it takes to win a Red Hat Innovation Award
    Last year I penned the below post to provide insight into what the judges of the Red Hat Innovation Awards are looking for when reviewing submissions. Looking back, I would give almost the identical advice again this year...maybe with a few tweaks. With all the stellar nominations that we receive, the question I often get is, “how can we make our entry standout?” There’s no magic formula for winning the Red Hat Innovation Awards, but there are things that the other judges and I look for in the entries. Overall, we’re looking for the project that tells a compelling story. It’s not just about sharing what Red Hat products and services you used, we want to hear the full narrative. What challenges did you face; how you implemented the project; and ultimately, what was the true business impact and transformation that took place? Submissions that are able to showcase how open source culture and values were key to success, or how the project is making a difference in the lives of others, are the entries that most often rise to the top.

today's howtos

OSS Leftovers

  • How to be an effective and professional member of the Samba user and development Community
    For many years we have run these lists dedicated to developing and promoting Samba, without any set of clear guidelines for people to know what to expect when participating.  What do we require? What kind of behavior is encouraged?
  • Blockcerts Updates Open Source Blockchain Architecture
    Learning Machine is making changes to its Blockcerts Credential Issuer, Verifier and Wallet to enable native support for records issuance and verification using any blockchain. Blockcerts was launched by Learning Machine and MIT Media Lab in 2016 as new way to allow students to receive digital diplomas through an app, complementing a traditional paper degree. Blockcerts was originally designed to be blockchain-agnostic, which means that open standards can be used to anchor records in any blockchain. The Blockcerts Universal Identifier recognizes which blockchain is being used and verifies accordingly. Currently, the open source project has added support for bitcoin and Ethereum blockchains, but anyone can add support through the project's GitHub page.
  • First full featured open-source Ethereum block explorer BlockScout launched by POA Network
  • Amsterdam-based ING Bank Introduces Open-Source Zero Knowledge Technology
  • ING Bank Launches Open Source Privacy Improvement Add-On for Blockchains
  • Imec tool accelerates DNA sequencing 10x
    As a result, in a typical run, elPrep is up to ten times faster than other software tools using the same resources. It is designed as a seamless replacement that delivers the exact same results as GATK4.0 developed by the Broad Institute. elPrep has been written in the Go programming language and is available through the open-source GNU Affero General Public License v3 (AGPL-3.0).
  • On the low adoption of automated testing in FOSS
    A few times in the recent past I've been in the unfortunate position of using a prominent Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) program or library, and running into issues of such fundamental nature that made me wonder how those issues even made it into a release. In all cases, the answer came quickly when I realized that, invariably, the project involved either didn't have a test suite, or, if it did have one, it was not adequately comprehensive. I am using the term comprehensive in a very practical, non extreme way. I understand that it's often not feasible to test every possible scenario and interaction, but, at the very least, a decent test suite should ensure that under typical circumstances the code delivers all the functionality it promises to. [...] Most FOSS projects, at least those not supported by some commercial entity, don't come with any warranty; it's even stated in the various licenses! The lack of any formal obligations makes it relatively inexpensive, both in terms of time and money, to have the occasional bug in the codebase. This means that there are fewer incentives for the developer to spend extra resources to try to safeguard against bugs. When bugs come up, the developers can decide at their own leisure if and when to fix them and when to release the fixed version. Easy! At first sight, this may seem like a reasonably pragmatic attitude to have. After all, if fixing bugs is so cheap, is it worth spending extra resources trying to prevent them?
  •  
  • Chrome for Linux, Mac, and Windows Now Features Picture-in-Picture by Default
    Chromium evanghelist at Google François Beaufort announced today that Picture-in-Picture (PiP) support is now enabled by defualt in the Google Chrome web browser for Linux, Mac, and Windows platforms. Google's engineers have been working for months to add Picture-in-Picture (PiP) support to the Google Chrome web browser, but the long-anticipated feature is finally here, enabled by default in the latest version for Linux, Mac, and Windows operating systems. The feature lets you detach a video in a floating window so you can watch it while doing something else on your computer.
  • Teaching With an Index Card: the Benefits of Free, Open-Source Tools
  • Decentralized Authentication for Self-Sovereign Identities using Name Systems
    The GNU Name System (GNS) is a fully decentralized public key infrastructure and name system with private information retrieval semantics. It serves a holistic approach to interact seamlessly with IoT ecosystems and enables people and their smart objects to prove their identity, membership and privileges - compatible with existing technologies. In this report we demonstrate how a wide range of private authentication and identity management scenarios are addressed by GNS in a cost-efficient, usable and secure manner. This simple, secure and privacy-friendly authentication method is a significant breakthrough when cyber peace, privacy and liability are the priorities for the benefit of a wide range of the population. After an introduction to GNS itself, we show how GNS can be used to authenticate servers, replacing the Domain Name System (DNS) and X.509 certificate authorities (CAs) with a more privacy-friendly but equally usable protocol which is trustworthy, human-centric and includes group authentication. We also built a demonstrator to highlight how GNS can be used in medical computing to simplify privacy-sensitive data processing in the Swiss health-care system. Combining GNS with attribute-based encryption, we created ReclaimID, a robust and reliable OpenID Connect-compatible authorization system. It includes simple, secure and privacy-friendly single sign-on to seamlessly share selected attributes with Web services, cloud ecosystems. Further, we demonstrate how ReclaimID can be used to solve the problem of addressing, authentication and data sharing for IoT devices. These applications are just the beginning for GNS; the versatility and extensibility of the protocol will lend itself to an even broader range of use-cases. GNS is an open standard with a complete free software reference implementation created by the GNU project. It can therefore be easily audited, adapted, enhanced, tailored, developed and/or integrated, as anyone is allowed to use the core protocols and implementations free of charge, and to adopt them to their needs under the terms of the GNU Affero General Public License, a free software license approved by the Free Software Foundation.
  • Make: an open source hardware, Arduino-powered, 3D-printed wire-bending machine
    How To Mechatronics has pulled together detailed instructions and a great video explaining how to make an Arduino-powered, 3D-printed wire-bending machine whose gears can create arbitrary vector images out of precision-bent continuous lengths of wire.
  • RApiDatetime 0.0.4: Updates and Extensions
    The first update in a little while brings us release 0.0.4 of RApiDatetime which got onto CRAN this morning via the lovely automated sequence of submission, pretest-recheck and pretest-publish. RApiDatetime provides seven entry points for C-level functions of the R API for Date and Datetime calculations. The functions asPOSIXlt and asPOSIXct convert between long and compact datetime representation, formatPOSIXlt and Rstrptime convert to and from character strings, and POSIXlt2D and D2POSIXlt convert between Date and POSIXlt datetime. This releases brings asDatePOSIXct as a seventh courtesy of Josh Ulrich. All these functions are all fairly useful, but not one of them was previously exported by R for C-level use by other packages. Which is silly as this is generally extremely carefully written and tested code.
  • 6 JavaScript books you should know
    If there was ever the potential for a giant book list it's one based on our favorite Javascript books. But, this list is short and easy to digest. Maybe it will help you get started, gently. Plus, check out three of our top Javascript articles with even more books, resources, and tips.

Security: Telstra, Google+ and Facebook Incidents, and Latest Updates