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Software

Wine Staging 2.9

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Software

Software: MAAS, Browsers, GNU libmicrohttpd and More

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Software

  • MAAS 2.2.0 Released!

    Please note that MAAS 2.2 will replace the MAAS 2.1 series, which will go out of support. We are holding MAAS 2.2 in the above PPA for a week, to provide enough notice to users that it will replace 2.1 series. In the following weeks, MAAS 2.2 will be backported into Ubuntu Xenial.

  • Intel Opens Up Compute Library for Deep Neural Networks
  • Coreboot Ready To Ship On Upcoming Purism Librem 13/15 Laptops
  • Voice of the Masses: What’s your favourite web browser?

    We suspect many users have jumped between Firefox and Chrome/Chromium over the years. Some power users may have switched to keyboard-driven apps like Qutebrowser. Or maybe you’re still rocking Lynx! In any case, let us know in the comments below, and we’ll read out the best in our upcoming podcast.

  • Difference Between PostgreSQL And MySQL And How To Migrate From MySQL To PostgreSQL

    ​Databases are a crucial tool for any developer or a development enterprise. If you are a software developer you already know that your application needs a database to store data. One thing to have in the count is to choose the best database for your application. There are two types of databases, SQL and NoSQL databases. The first one being the oldest. SQL databases are very famous and still being used largely around big organizations and most of SQL solutions are paid but, there are good free solutions out there with MySQL Community Edition and PostgreSQL on the top. In this article, we will let you know more about this two databases and how to migrate from MySQL to PostgreSQL.

  • WPS Office's Linux development has been halted

    Users looking for a Microsoft Office clone on Linux will be disappointed to hear that WPS Office’s development on Linux has been halted. The most recent build for Linux was released almost one year ago, with the most recent version being v10.1.0.5672 Alpha.

    The fact that development had stalled was raised after one Twitter users reached out to WPS Office to ask why there hadn’t been a new release for a while. The response came back saying that it was "on a halt" and that it needs “community builds”; there’s little chance that community builds will become a thing within the next few months given that WPS Office is not even open source, making community maintenance somewhat of a challenge.

  • GNU libmicrohttpd 0.9.55 released

    I'm glad to announce the release of GNU libmicrohttpd 0.9.55.

    GNU libmicrohttpd is a small C library that is supposed to make it easy to run an HTTP server as part of another application. GNU libmicrohttpd is fully HTTP 1.1 compliant and supports IPv6. Finally, GNU libmicrohttpd is fast, portable and has a simple API and (without TLS support and other optional features) a small binary size (~32k).

  • GNU's libmicrohttpd 0.9.55 Embeddable Web Server Released

    This lightweight web server continues to be HTTP 1.1 compliant and provides a simple API for integration into other GPL applications. There are security fixes in libmicrohttpd uncovered by the Mozilla Secure Open Source Fund initiative. There are also fixes for building on Linux in some conditions and other basic fixes and optimizations.

  • [Older] GNU Guix & GuixSD 0.13.0 released

Games and Software Leftovers

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Software
Gaming
  • Golem 0.6.0 released for Ubuntu, macOS, and Windows

    Golem Project, creator of the first global market for idle computer power today announced it released Golem 0.6.0 for Ubuntu, macOS, and Windows. The team stated that the majority of changes are not directly visible to the user, but there are a few noteworthy modifications.

  • Stardock CEO asking to see interest in Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation on Linux with Vulkan

    Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation [GOG][Steam][Official Site] will come to Linux if Stardock see enough requests for it. The CEO of Stardock has requested to see how much interest there is.

  • Chrome won

    The chart above shows the percentage market share of the 4 major browsers over the last 6 years, across all devices. The data is from StatCounter and you can argue that the data is biased in a bunch of different ways, but at the macro level it's safe to say that Chrome is eating the browser market, and everyone else except Safari is getting obliterated.

  • Mailman 3.1.0 released

    The 3.1.0 release of the Mailman mailing list manager is out. "Two years after the original release of Mailman 3.0, this version contains a huge number of improvements across the entire stack. Many bugs have been fixed and new features added in the Core, Postorius (web u/i), and HyperKitty (archiver). Upgrading from Mailman 2.1 should be better too. We are seeing more production sites adopt Mailman 3, and we've been getting great feedback as these have rolled out. Important: mailman-bundler, our previous recommended way of deploying Mailman 3, has been deprecated. Abhilash Raj is putting the finishing touches on Docker images to deploy everything, and he'll have a further announcement in a week or two." New features include support for Python 3.5 and 3.6, MySQL support, new REST resources and methods, user interface and user experience improvements, and more.

  • Cockpit – Monitor And Administer Linux Servers Via Web Browser

    Cockpit is free, open source Server administration tool that allows you to easily monitor and administrator single or multiple Linux servers via a web browser. It helps the system admins to do simple administration tasks, such as starting containers, administrating storage, configuring network, inspecting logs and so on. Switching between Terminal and Cockpit is no big deal. You can the manage the system’s services either from the Cockpit, or from the host’s Terminal. Say for example, if you started a service in Terminal, you can stop it from the Cockpit. Similarly, if an error occurs in the terminal, it can be seen in the Cockpit journal interface and vice versa. It is capable of monitoring multiple Linux servers at the same time. All you need to do is just add the systems you wanted to monitor, and Cockpit will look after them.

  • Buttercup – A Modern Password Manager for Linux

    Buttercup is a cross-platform, free, and open-source password manager with which you can remotely access any of your accounts using a single master password. It features a modern minimal UI, password imports from 3rd-party apps, and basic merge conflict resolution.

  • FreeFileSync The Best Backup And File Synchronization Tool For All Platforms

    FreeFileSync is an open source free to download and use software that can sync your files easily to another disk while maintaining permissions and other important stuff. It is cross platform so you can use it on any OS without any problem. Let us see how to download and use it in Linux.

What to Expect (and Not Expect) from Linux Universal Packages

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GNU
Linux
Software

Last June, Canonical Software launched the development of Snap packages, which are intended to work on any Linux distribution. A week later, Red Hat announced its own version of universal packages, called Flatpak. In the months since, both Flatpak and Snap have been promoted as the solutions to the problems with traditional package formats. However, the solutions are not as complete as advertised and call for a rearrangement of the responsibility for security for which free software is simply not prepared.

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Wine 2.9

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Software

Software Letovers

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Software
  • fman – A Present Day File Manager for Power Usesr

    fman, is a smart console-driven, an alternative file manager with an eye candy UI, a swift performance, a responsive app window, and support for extensibility using plugins. Its modern design and speedy operation have arguably earned it the right to be referred to as a “present day file manager for power users”.

  • MPV – A Cross-Platform CLI-Based VLC Alternative

    MPV Video Player is a free, open-source and cross-platform media player with tons of features including support for frame timing, MKV chapters and subtitles. It boats a responsive video player application with minimal design-based layout that is easily customizable with themes.

  • MKVToolNix 12.0.0 Open-Source MKV Manipulation App Improves MPEG TS Reader, GUI

    While not a major milestone, MKVToolNix 12.0.0 is a recommended update for all users running MKVToolNix 11.0.0 or a previous version because it includes an important bug fix in the HEVC/H.265 code to avoid generating invalid files. Additionally, the new release comes with an important warning for Windows users.

  • Weblate 2.14.1
  • Activities Activities Activities

    Several weeks ago, my colleague Bruce posted an article on KDE/Plasma Activities, and this got me thinking again about this rather interesting and often overlooked functionality. On paper, it is supposed to be a killer feature; make your desktop fully customized to your specific needs. In reality, most people have no idea it exists, and Plasma makes it even more difficult to discover and use than in KDE4.

    Emboldened, my curiosity piqued, I decided to run my own test and see how useful and practical Activities really are, compared to the classic – and static – setup featuring an interactive desktop with icons and widgets, a multi-purpose panel, and a live search menu. Shall we?

Software: NetworkManager, Kodi, Cumulus Weather App, Streamlink, Calibre

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Software
  • NetworkManager changes and improvements

    NetworkManager is the default service in Fedora for interfacing with the low level networking in the Kernel. It was created to provide a high-level interface for initializing and configuring networking on a system without shell scripts. Over the past few Fedora releases, the NetworkManager developers have put in a lot of effort to make it even better. This article covers some of the major improvements that have been implemented in NetworkManager over the past few Fedora releases.

  • Pioneer Kodi plug-in unplugs

    Developers of the popular Kodi plug-in Navi-X have pulled the plug on further development, citing the "current legal climate" around its work.

    The developers of the plugin, which first appeared a decade ago, state that they're no longer able to host Navi-X programme guides:

  • Cumulus Weather App for Linux Desktop

    ​Once upon a time, there used to be a very popular app called Stormcloud. And then it was no more. With the developer citing a range of issues including issues with the Yahoo API being used and the lack of time on the part of the developer. Some folks in the Linux community tried resurrecting it by creating a fork called Typhoon. And unfortunately, once again, that did not last for a long time. Now another developer by name Daryl Bennett with the aid of the original developer of Stormcloud has resurrected the app, and now it is called Cumulus.

  • Streamlink – Watch Online Video Streams From Command Line

    Streamlink is a command line streaming utility that allows you to watch online video streams in popular media players, such as VLC, MPlayer, MPlayer2, MPC-HC, mpv, Daum Pot Player, QuickTime, and OMXPlayer etc. It is written using Python programming language, and was forked from LiveStreamer, which is no longer maintained. Streamlink currently supports popular live video streaming services, such as YouTube, Dailymotion, Livestream, Twitch, UStream, and many more. Streamlink is built upon a plugin system which allows support for new services to be easily added. A full list of plugins currently included can be found on the Plugins page. Streamlink supports GNU/Linux, *BSDs, Microsoft Windows, and Mac OS X.

  • Linux utils that you might not know
  • Calibre A Free And Open Source Ebook Management System For Linux

    Having ebooks is really a good thing. It can be read anywhere, you get free from the hassle of storage and many more benefits. But it creates a problem when you got an enormous number of ebooks also in various formats. You will have the problem of searching perfect ebook you want to read at a time, you have to maintain various kind of software for every format and much more.

Software: Linfo, EasyTag, Simple Scan, Albert, VLC, Remote Desktop, Frogr, Brisk Menu, and OpenShot

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Software
  • Linfo – Shows Linux Server Health Status in Real-Time

    Linfo is a free and open source, cross-platform server statistics UI/library which displays a great deal of system information. It is extensible, easy-to-use (via composer) PHP5 library to get extensive system statistics programmatically from your PHP application. It’s a Ncurses CLI view of Web UI, which works in Linux, Windows, *BSD, Darwin/Mac OSX, Solaris, and Minix.

  • 2 tag management tools for organizing your music library

    These days, EasyTag seems to be my go-to tag editor. While I can't claim to have tried them all, I have mostly stopped looking now that I have this one. Generally speaking, I like its three-panel layout: file system directory on the left; selected tracks in the middle, showing file name and tags; and specific tags and cover image on the right.

  • New Simple Scan Designs Emerge; Seeking Devs to Implement Them

    Simple Scan is one of my personal favourite and perhaps even one of the "essential" apps on the Linux desktop for me. It does what it says on the tin: it's simple and it scans, with a nice preview system and enough options to be decently functional. Some new designs for the app have emerged and they are looking quite nice indeed.

    GNOME UX designer and Red Hat Desktop Team Member, Allan Day, showed the new mockup designs off in his blog post. Simple Scan has a pretty sparse and simplistic interface already, and I mean that in a positive way, but Allan believes that "just because it's great, doesn't mean it can't be improved" and that most of the improvements are simply "refinements", rather than major overhauls, in order to make some of the app's functions a bit easier to discover and navigate.

  • Albert – A Fast, Lightweight and Flexible Application Launcher for Linux

    A while ago, we have written about Ulauncher which is used to launch application quickly. Today we came up with similar kind of utility called Albert which is doing the same job and have some additional unique features which is not there in ulauncher.

  • 5 Tricks To Get More Out Of VLC Player In Linux

    In fact, for the desktop, VLC is much more than just a tool to play videos stored on your hard drive! So, stay with me for a tour of the lesser known features of that great software.

  • 5 of the Best Linux Remote Desktop Apps to Remotely Access a Computer

    Remote desktop apps are a very useful group of apps because they allow access to a computer anywhere in the world. While the simplest way to do this is via a terminal, if you don’t want to have to type commands but rather want a more advanced way to access a remote computer, here are five of the best remote desktop apps for Linux.

  • Frogr 1.3 released
  • Brisk Menu 0.4.0 Is Out with Super Key Support, Adapts to Vertical Panel Layouts

    Solus Project founder and lead developer Ikey Doherty is today announcing the release and immediate availability of the Brisk Menu 0.4.0 application menu for Solus and other supported GNU/Linux distributions.

  • OpenShot 2.3.3 Open-Source Video Editor Released with Stability Improvements

    OpenShot developer Jonathan Thomas is announcing the release and immediate availability of the third maintenance update to the OpenShot 2.3 stable series of the open-source and cross-platform non-linear video editor.

Wine Staging 2.8

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Software

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • A Small improvement, A Big reason

    I have always had a special inclination towards Linux. Privacy, Security, Simplicity (GUI) and Power (Shell). It has its issues but it has its strengths as well. However, sometimes you find that in a software, when that one thing that makes or breaks your workflow is absent, you find yourself unable to continue using it.

    In my case, it was Evince.

    For many reasons I had to use Windows for a couple of months. Dual Booting on my laptop failed despite many tries and my college project required exclusively Windows-only software and the Microsoft Office Suite. They are just 2 reasons of many. However, one big reason I used Windows was the lack of the exact PDF reader I wanted. Silly? Let me explain.

  • Calibre 2.85 Ebook Manager App Adds Support for Kobo Aura H2O Edition 2 eReader

    Calibre developer Kovid Goyal released this weekend yet another maintenance update to his popular, free, cross-platform and open source ebook library management software for all supported operating systems.

    Calibre 2.85 arrived on Friday, May 12, 2017, exactly one week after Calibre 2.84, bringing an updated Kobo driver that now supports the recently unveiled Kobo Aura H2O Edition 2 eReader device, along with a bunch of new features like the ability to right-click on the Book Details panel to search the Internet for the current ebook or other works by that author.

  • Mo Morsi: RetroFlix – A Weekend Project

    It was built as a Sinatra web service, simply acting as a frontend to a popular emulator database, allowing the user to navigate & preview app for various systems, and download / run them locally. The RetroFlix application itself is offered as a lightweight Microservice simply acting as a proxy to the required various underlying components. It's fairly simple to setup & install (see the README), and builds upon existing emulators & components the user has locally.

  • PuTTY SSH Client And Telnet Client

    ​PuTTY as an SSH and Telnet client was originally developed by Simon Tatham for the Windows platform. It is the most popular SSH client on Windows. It is also available on Linux and other operating systems as a direct port of the Windows SSH client. It is also able to use as a client for rlogin and raw TCP computing protocols.

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HTC U11 Life (Android One) review: Keep it simple

Android One has arrived in Europe, and HTC is one of the first manufacturers to ship an affordable, Google-branded phone. The Android One badge made its debut in India and parts of Asia, as Google emphasized quality software on super-cheap hardware. But with its latest round of "One" handsets, the prices are higher, the products more premium, and the hand on the software rudder a little firmer. The Android One U11 Life — unlike the T-Mobile U.S. version we reviewed separately, running HTC Sense — runs Android 8.0 Oreo out of the box, and comes with the promise of timely updates to future versions. It takes the fundamentals of HTC's flagship phone and downscales it into a smaller size, while trimming the specs back to the essentials. There's a Snapdragon 630 processor — Qualcomm's latest mid-ranger, and the successor to the very capable 625/626 — along with 3GB or 4GB of RAM, and 32 or 64GB of storage, plus microSD. I've been using the 3/32GB model for the past couple of weeks, however the UK will be getting the more capacious 4/64GB model when it goes on sale. Read more

The power of open source: Why GitLab's move to a Developer Certificate of Origin benefits the developer community

Over the past few years, open source software has transformed the way enterprises operate and ship code. In an era where companies are striving to deliver the next best application, enterprises are turning to the sea of open source contributors to create projects faster and more effectively than ever before. For instance, 65 percent of companies surveyed in The Black Duck Future of Open Source Survey reveal they are contributing to open source projects – with 59 percent doing so to gain a competitive edge. As open source continues to have a positive influence on software development, it’s important for developers to continue to participate in and contribute to open source projects. Read more