Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Software

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Making Videos on Linux - Linux Gamer

    We’ve come a long way with multimedia production on the Linux desktop. Our tools have become much more powerful, and far more approachable–even in the short time I’ve been doing my show. So here’s a quick overview of how I produce my videos.

    I believe that the most important thing with Internet video is audio. It seems unintuitive, but I have found this to be the case. The difference between a good video and a great one can be determined by the price of your microphone and how you use it.

    The quality of hardware is equally as important as the pacing of audio editing and the post-processing. I use a program called Ocenaudio to edit my voice overs, the music in my videos, and sound effects. I use the built-in enhancement tools like the equalizer, compressor, and normalizer to process my voice and filter out any background noise.

    [...]

    I guess, when it comes down to making my videos, I could get by with virtually any software tool. OpenShot or PiTiVi would work much like KdenLive, though the process would be a bit more tedious. In fact, a much younger Gardiner actually won an award for a video he edited using the XP version of Windows Movie Maker. (He was 14 and didn’t know any better.) But I choose to use KdenLive because of its powerful toolset and the virtually limitless number of video and audio tracks.

  • OpenShot Video Editor 2.1

    A lot of Linux users may use OpenShot Video Editor to edit and manipulate videos. The Editor is a very powerful tool for those who wish to create or manipulate videos. This article will cover installing the newest version and adding Images and using Transitions to perform special animations with the images creating slide shows.

    The most current version (1.4.3) is what is available on Synaptic. A newer version (2.1.0) is now available using the OpenShot PPA.

  • Sandstorm now supports RHEL 7, CentOS 7, Arch, and more

    This means that Sandstorm can now be installed on Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7, as well as its cousin CentOS 7, both of which use kernel version 3.10.

  • Terminix 1.3.5 Released With Quake Mode Improvements

    Terminix is a GTK3 tiling terminal emulator. The application allows splitting terminals horizontally and vertically, arranging them using drag and drop, along with quite a few other useful features.

  • Xfce Gets A `Do Not Disturb` Mode And Per Application Notification Settings

    The Xfce developers are busy porting Xfce applications and components to GTK3, and in the process, they are also adding new features.

    "Do not disturb", a much requested feature, landed in xfce4-notifyd 0.3.4 (the Xfce notification daemon) recently. Using this, you can suppress notification bubbles for a limited time-frame.

  • Spotify bug is slowly killing hard drives with data vomit

    SPOTIFY USERS are up in arms after a long-standing bug came to light which is causing gigabytes of 'junk' data to be written to users’ hard drives.

    The bug, which is said to affect Mac and Linux as well as Windows, is of particular concern because constant writes to a drive will inevitably shorten its life.

    And to be clear, the problem is made worse if you’re on a newfangled solid state drive as they have a finite number of writes before each sector gives up.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
HowTos
  • How Docker changes application monitoring

    As operations, IT, and engineering organizations coalesce around the value and importance of containers, they often ask the seemingly logical question: “How do I monitor Docker in my production environment?” As it turns out, this question has it backward. Monitoring the Docker daemon, the Kubernetes master, or the Mesos scheduler isn’t especially complicated, and there are, in fact, solutions for each of these.

    Running your applications in Docker containers only changes how the applications are packaged, scheduled, and orchestrated, not how they actually run. The question, properly rephrased, becomes, “How does Docker change how I monitor my applications?” As you might imagine, the answer to this question: “It depends.”

    The answer will be dictated by the dependencies of your environment and your use cases and objectives. The orchestration technology you use, the Docker image philosophy you follow, and the level of observability your containerized application provides, among other considerations, will all factor into how you monitor your applications.

    To begin to understand how a microservices regimen and a Dockerized environment will affect your monitoring strategy, ask yourself the following four simple questions. Note that the answers may differ for different applications, and your approach to monitoring should reflect these differences.

  • New libvirt website design
  • Spotify Windows, Mac, Linux desktop app: Update now to stop it trashing your SSD

    Music-streaming service Spotify has released an important update that stops its desktop client tearing into storage drives with massive and unnecessary write rates.

  • Alexa – Making that First Application Run
  • Shaggy Dogs and SpiderMonkey Unwinders
  • OVN Logical Flows and ovn-trace
  • Agile development w/ CI/CD – Automated cloud building & deployment (from scratch)

Wine 1.9.23 Adds Support for Myst V: End of Ages, Improves Unreal Engine 4 Games

Filed under
Software

Just a few moments ago, the team behind the popular Wine open-source and free implementation of Windows on Unix announced the availability of the Wine 1.9.23 development release.

Read more

Also: Wine 1.9.23 Adds More Color Format Support For Direct3D

Software and Games

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • A New Version of SimpleScreenRecorder Has Been Released

    A new version of Simple Screen Recorder, a powerful desktop screen capture programme for Linux, premiered earlier this month. It is the first update to the app in almost a year. SimpleScreenRecorder 0.3.x adds support for the latest FFmpeg/libav libraries, supports fragmented recording (whatever that may be) and the indicator applet icon will now notify you when there’s an error during capture.

  • OpenMW 0.40 - Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind on Linux

    The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind is one of my personal favourite games of all time. Years ago I would have happily run the game in Linux, but the only real way to do so was through WINE. Thanks to OpenMW, a totally rewritten and open source engine for Morrowind, it is now very much possible to have a near complete Morrowind experience, completely natively.

    OpenMW has been in development for some years now and if you've been following its development, you would know Morrowind has been playable to varying degrees with each new release. When I last tried out OpenMW (again, on Linux) a couple of years ago, it was amazing how much did work, but there were certainly missing features like opening doors in-game. You could get around these issues by using the in-game console to activate objects like doors, but it was obviously not a complete experience that you would get with vanilla Morrowind.

  • Dishonored 2 Linux support is only a pipe dream

    Dishonored 2 isn’t even officially out yet and the sequel to the critically acclaimed original is already stepping on some toes. On top of the recent problems regarding the 9 GB day one patch, the eagerly awaited title also lacks Linux support.

Software and Games

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • 3 Great Linux Apps I Never Knew Existed

    I’ve written about a lot of desktop Linux software in the nearly 8 years this site has been running. Apps, utilities, tools and clients for almost everything, from bling-laden music players to java monstrosities via photo editors and command line Twitter clients. And yet even I have not heard of every app that’s out there.

  • Temps is a Beautiful Open Source Weather App

    But when the weather is unpredictable, or to keep an eye on its plans for the coming days, we turn to weather forecast apps, websites and services.

    A slate of desktop weather apps are available for Linux. These range from basic terminal-based reports to indicator applets that unfurl all kinds of meteorological mumbo jumbo.

  • Atom 1.12

    New APIs available in Chrome 52 allowed us to take on this long-requested feature. The new APIs turned out to be less important than we originally thought but we’re nonetheless happy to report Atom users in all locales now get typical keyboard behavior in Atom’s default installation.

  • Atom 1.12 Hackable Text Editor Released with International Keyboard Support

    On November 9, 2016, GitHub's Ian Olsen was proud to announce the release and immediate availability of the Atom 1.12 open-source and hackable text editor for all supported platforms.

    Atom 1.12 has been in Beta stages of development since the release of Atom 1.11 on October 11, 2016, and it now hits the stable channel with a bunch of exciting new features, among which we can mention international keyboard support Electron 1.3.6 update, which also brings Chrome 52 along for this update.

  • 0 A.D. Alpha 21 "Ulysses" Open-Source Game of Ancient Warfare Adds New Features

    Wildfire Games was proud to announce the release of the twenty-first Alpha update to its 0 A.D. open-source game of ancient warfare for supported Linux-based operating systems, as well as Microsoft Windows and Mac OS X platforms.

    Dubbed Ulysses, the 0 A.D. Alpha 21 release features a large number of content and improvements, starting with a bunch of new maps that you'll most certainly want to conquer, as well as several new game modes, and continuing with the official introduction of the final civilization, namely The Seleucid Empire.

    Prominent gameplay features include the Herocide and Regicide, Wonder Victory, and Last Man Standing modes, new champions and buildings, the ability for Briton Crannog to act as both a dock and civic center, and support for Hellenic Royal Stoa and Persian Hall to train new Infantry Champions in the city and town phases.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • NetworkManager 1.6 to Support the systemd-resolved Local DNS Forwarder Backend

    NetworkManager developer Lubomir Rintel announced today, November 6, 2016, the availability for download of the first development snapshot towards the major NetworkManager 1.6 release of the widely-used network connection manager.

    NetworkManager 1.6 will probably launch next year and promises exciting new features, including Vala bindings for the libnm library, the ability to keep most network connection up during system shutdown, except Wi-Fi and VPN, and support for removing new connections or disconnect devices to the checkpoint/restore connection functionality.

  • PeaZip 6.2.0 Open-Source Archiving App Released with Revamped File Browser, More

    PeaZip, a free and cross-platform graphical file archiver that supports extracting and compressing of over 180 archive types, including 7-Zip, FreeArc, RAR, LHA, PAQ, ISO, UPX, 7Z, ACE, CAB, ZIP, XZ, ARJ, BZ2, and TAR was recently updated to version 6.2.0.

    PeaZip 6.2.0 appears to be a major release that updates the 7z backend to version 16.04 for Windows platforms, and introduces real-time display of cumulative progress when running simultaneous jobs to the GUI (Graphical User Interface) for the archiving and extraction operations.

  • Introducting GPS Ami

    Once upon a time, I started geotagging my photos. For that I bought a GPS logger, an Holux M-1200E. The device works great with gpsbabel, and since my photography workflow was stuck on MacOS, I used Houdah GPS (which uses gpsbabel behind the scene, BTW). Also I have been working for too long on moving that workflow to Linux and GNOME. At one point I even started to write an app I called "Magellan" to do what that MacOS tool did, as a part of my other project, Niepce. I didn't really get motivated so it went nowhere. It was written in C++ like the rest of Niepce. The technology isn't the problem here.

  • Spotify is testing a new layout for its desktop player

    As part of updates to its Windows and web desktop apps, the official Spotify for Linux client has picked up a minor redesign. Well, sort of. The company is testing a small redesign of the main player control UI in its desktop app with a sub-section of Spotify desktop users.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Leftovers: Software Development

Filed under
Development
Software
  • podlators 4.09

    This package contains the Pod::Man and Pod::Text formatters for Perl.

    This is a bug-fix release that fixes a long-standing problem with Pod::Text on EBCDIC systems. The code to handle non-breaking spaces and soft hyphens hard-coded the ASCII code points and deleted the open bracket character on EBCDIC systems.

  • gspell and LaTeXila – progress report

    In September I’ve launched two small fundraisings on gspell and LaTeXila. The two goals are now reached, thanks!

    I’ve started working on those two projects, here is a progress report.

  • PackPack: Simple Building Of RPMs & Debian Packages From Git Repos

    PackPack is a new open-source (BSD-licensed) project for building RPM and Debian packages from Git repository software sources. PackPack leverages Docker containers, semantic versioning, and can interface with the Travis continuous integration software.

    PackPack was developed by the Mail.Ru Group for automating release management of open-source and closed-source projects. It aims to reduce push-to-package time "from hours to minutes" and supports building packages of OS targets including Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, and CentOS. Building for these different targets relies upon Docker for using an OS image for that particular target.

  • The iconic text editor Vim celebrates 25 years

    Two years later, with the 2.0 release, Vim's feature set had exceeded that of vi, so the acronym was changed to "Vi IMproved," Today, having just marked its 25th birthday, Vim is available on a wide array of platforms—Windows, OS/2, OpenVMS, BSD, Android, iOS—and it comes shipped standard with OS X and many Linux distros. It is praised by many, reviled by many, and is a central player in the ongoing conflicts between groups of developers. Interview questions have even been asked: "Emacs or Vim?" Vim is licensed freely, under a charityware license compatible with the GPL.

  • ANNOUNCE: libvirt-glib release 1.0.0
  • Heads-up on NSS 3.27, Guam

    Many distributions, among which Fedora in 23 & 24, and Arch Linux, have recently shipped NSS 3.27, sometimes packaged as 3.27.0, or even 3.27.1. This release may just have triggered some confusion about disabling, enabling, and defaulting to or not, the NSS implementation of TLS version 1.3 (currently in draft). Fun!

Latest on CodeWeavers/CrossOver

Filed under
Microsoft
Software
  • The Times Are a Changing

    When did it hit me that the times were a changin’ at CodeWeavers corporate Headquarters (and no it wasn’t when Bob Dylan got awarded the Noble Peace Prize for Literature)? Maybe it was when we introduced CrossOver on a platform not in our sandbox – ANDROID. Or when we lost our COO of 14 years to a new career opportunity, or rearranged the office (everyone had to move offices and have a new office mate), or chalk painted furniture, or had an office pet for a day, or when the conference room moved, or the standard monthly company meeting date moved after 20 years in existence (revolution). AND we bribed attendance with bagels instead of donuts. Or was it when everyone went from a Linux or macOS to a Windows system?

  • Microsoft Office 2013 Working On CrossOver 16

    CodeWeavers announced this week they've hit the milestone in CrossOver 16 development where they have been able to successfully register Microsoft Office 2016 in an internal alpha build of CrossOver 16. With this support in the upcoming CrossOver 2016, Office 2013 is working with all core functionality including Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Project.

  • CodeWeavers to Bring Microsoft Office 2013 to CrossOver 16 for Linux and macOS

    On the third day of November 2016, CodeWeavers, the company behind the popular, yet commercial CrossOver graphical user interface (GUI) to Wine, celebrated a major milestone, as they successfully registered Microsoft Office 2013 in the application.

    Yes, you're reading that right, the next major CrossOver release, versioned 16, will bring support for the Microsoft Office 2013 office suite. What this means for you is that you'll finally be able to install, register and use Microsoft Office 2013 on your GNU/Linux or macOS operating system using CrossOver 16, due for release later this year.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux Devices, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • SAP buys into blockchain, joins Hyperledger Project
  • foss-north speaker line-up
    I am extremely pleased to have confirmed the entire speaker line-up for foss north 2017. This will be a really good year!
  • Chromium/Chrome Browser Adds A glTF Parser
    Google's Chrome / Chromium web-browser has added a native glTF 1.0 parser. The GL Transmission Format, of course, being Khronos' "3D asset delivery format" for dealing with compressed scenes and assets by WebGL, OpenGL ES, and other APIs. There are glTF utility libraries in JavaScript and other web-focused languages, but Google adding a native glTF 1.0 parser appears to be related to their VR push with supporting VR content on the web. Their glTF parser was added to Chromium Git on Friday.
  • Sex and Gor and open source
    A few weeks ago, Dries Buytaert, founder of the popular open-source CMS Drupal, asked Larry Garfield, a prominent Drupal contributor and long-time member of the Drupal community, “to leave the Drupal project.” Why did he do this? He refuses to say. A huge furor has erupted in response — not least because the reason clearly has much to do with Garfield’s unconventional sex life. [...] I’ll unpack the first: open-source communities/projects are crucially important to many people’s careers and professional lives — cf “the cornerstone of my career” — so who they allow and deny membership to, and how their codes of conduct are constructed and followed, is highly consequential.
  • Hazelcast Releases 3.8 – The Fastest Open Source In-Memory Data Grid
  • SecureDrop and Alexandre Oliva are 2016 Free Software Awards winners
  • MRRF 17: Lulzbot and IC3D Release Line Of Open Source Filament
    Today at the Midwest RepRap Festival, Lulzbot and IC3D announced the creation of an Open Source filament. While the RepRap project is the best example we have for what can be done with Open Source hardware, the stuff that makes 3D printers work – filament, motors, and to some extent the electronics – are tied up in trade secrets and proprietary processes. As you would expect from most industrial processes, there is an art and a science to making filament and now these secrets will be revealed.
  • RApiDatetime 0.0.2

Security Leftovers

  • NSA: We Disclose 90% of the Flaws We Find
    In the wake of the release of thousands of documents describing CIA hacking tools and techniques earlier this month, there has been a renewed discussion in the security and government communities about whether government agencies should disclose any vulnerabilities they discover. While raw numbers on vulnerability discovery are hard to come by, the NSA, which does much of the country’s offensive security operations, discloses more than nine of every 10 flaws it finds, the agency’s deputy director said.
  • EFF Launches Community Security Training Series
    EFF is pleased to announce a series of community security trainings in partnership with the San Francisco Public Library. High-profile data breaches and hard-fought battles against unlawful mass surveillance programs underscore that the public needs practical information about online security. We know more about potential threats each day, but we also know that encryption works and can help thwart digital spying. Lack of knowledge about best practices puts individuals at risk, so EFF will bring lessons from its comprehensive Surveillance Self-Defense guide to the SFPL. [...] With the Surveillance Self-Defense project and these local events, EFF strives to help make information about online security accessible to beginners as well as seasoned techno-activists and journalists. We hope you will consider our tips on how to protect your digital privacy, but we also hope you will encourage those around you to learn more and make better choices with technology. After all, privacy is a team sport and everyone wins.
  • NextCloud, a security analysis
    First, I would like to scare everyone a little bit in order to have people appreciate the extent of this statement. As the figure that opens the post indicates, there are thousands of vulnerable Owncloud/NextCloud instances out there. It will surprise many just how easy is to detect those by trying out common URL paths during an IP sweep.
  • FedEx will deliver you $5.00 just to install Flash
    Bribes on offer as courier's custom printing service needs Adobe's security sinkhole

GNOME Extensions Website Has A New Look

Every GNOME Shell user will visit the official GNOME Shell Extensions website at least once. And if those users do so this weekend they’ll notice a small difference as the GNOME Shell Extensions website is sporting a minor redesign. This online repo plays host to a stack of terrific add-ons that add additional features and tweak existing ones. Read more