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Software

Wine Staging Release 2.10

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Software
  • Wine Staging Release 2.10

    The Wine Staging release 2.10 is now available.

  • Wine-Staging 2.10 Released With macOS Preloader

    Building off last week's Wine 2.10 release is now the adjoining Wine-Staging 2.10 release with various experimental/testing features tacked on.

    New functionality added to Wine-Staging 2.10 includes a macOS preloader, ntoskrnl and winedevice improvements, and various other bug fixes and improvements.

  • Wine 2.10 released, nothing massive this time around

    Wine 2.10 has release recently and this release is one of the less exciting releases for Linux gamers. I imagine the Wine-Staging release isn't far behind now too.

Software: Pomodoro, Stacer, UDisks, Qtractor

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Software
  • Gnome Pomodoro – A Timer to Help Increase Your Productivity

    I have written about apps that will help you concentrate by playing ambient noises e.g. Focusli and ANoise.

    This time around I’m introducing to you a timer app. It is based on the Pomodoro technique developed by Francesco Cirillo in the late 1980s and you might have come across it before (perhaps as a Chrome extension).

    The Pomodoro technique works by breaking down work into assigned time intervals (typically 25 minutes in length) separated by short breaks and that is exactly how Gnome Pomodoro works.

  • Linux System Utility ‘Stacer’ Updated with Process Monitoring Panel, New Look

    A new version Stacer, an open-source system cleaning n’ tune-up tool for Linux desktops, is available to download. Stacer 1.0.7 ships with improved language support, adds in a choice of light or dark theme, and introduces a new processes monitor. Processes can be sorted based on PID, CPU and memory usage, etc.

  • UDisks 2.7 Released, Migrates To Libblockdev

    The UDisks project that provides a D-Bus interface for querying and manipulating storage devices issued a big release earlier this month.

  • Lay down some audio tracks with Qtractor

    Whether you're an aspiring or accomplished musician, a volunteer roadie, or an experienced audio engineer, you'll be glad to hear that there are many options for making music with open source. This month, I want to introduce you to the sequencer that I use for my audio work, whether it's mixing soundtracks for short films or making music with my band or for myself: Qtractor.

    Qtractor is a digital audio workstation, a term that's a little fuzzy, but generally implies a model based around music tracks in the tradition of a multitrack recorder with an allowance for plugins and effects. In other words, Qtractor isn't a waveform editor like Audacity, and it isn't a DJ mixer like Mixxx. It's a big, all-in-one, one-stop-shop audio studio.

Software Releases: The New and the Slightly Older

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Software

Software Releases: SDL2, Opus, Nikita, Cockpit, Chirp, G'MIC, and GNU Software (GnuTLS, Gnuastro, Remotecontrol)

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GNU
Software
OSS
  • SDL2 Gets Initial Support For JACK Audio Kit

    SDL2 now has initial support for the JACK Audio Connection Kit sound server.

    SDL2 is now capable of targeting the multi-platform JACK sound server. It's a bit surprising JACK support for SDL has taken so long, but now it's there.

  • Opus Audio Codec 1.2 Release Candidate 1 Arrives

    Just weeks after the Opus 1.2 beta, the release candidate for this forthcoming audio codec update / library has been released.

    Libopus 1.2-rc1 is now available with additional fixes and improvements over the previous work in the 1.2 series, that included some ARM optimizations, low-bit-rate quality tuning, and more.

  • Release 0.1.1 of free software archive system Nikita announced

    I am very happy to report that the Nikita Noark 5 core project tagged its second release today. The free software solution is an implementation of the Norwegian archive standard Noark 5 used by government offices in Norway.

  • Cockpit 142

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from versions 141 and 142.

  • Chirp – An Electron-Based Twitter Client for Linux

    Twitter is arguably the biggest social media network after Facebook and that comes to us as no surprise since it is clear how it appeals to many users as not just a social site for exchanging photos but also as one to that helps one stay updated with online news and connected to various networking services.

  • G'MIC 2.0

    The IMAGE team of the research laboratory GREYC in Caen/France is pleased to announce the release of a new major version (numbered 2.0) of its project G’MIC: a generic, extensible, and open source framework for image processing. Here, we present the main advances made in the software since our last article. The new features presented here include the work carried out over the last twelve months (versions 2.0.0 and 1.7.x, for x varying from 2 to 9).

  • Sixteen new GNU releases in the month of May
  • GnuTLS 3.5.13
  • Gnuastro [GNU Astronomy Utilities] 0.3 released

    The third (version 0.3) release of GNU Astronomy Utilities (Gnuastro) is now available.

  • GNU Remotecontrol: Newsletter – June 2017

Leftovers: Software

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Software

WPS Office Really Needs GNU/Linux

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GNU
Linux
Software

Wine 2.10 Released

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Software

Software and today's howtos

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Software
HowTos
  • UDisks 2.7.0 released

    A new upstream version of UDisks2 was released on Friday (June 2nd) -- version 2.7.0. People following the recent development of UDisks2 and our recent blog posts [1] [2] should know that this is a big version bump which can only mean one thing: the pull request changing UDisks to use libblockdev where possible was merged! Which is almost 100 commits with changes.

  • FastHub is an Open-Source GitHub Client Application Built From Scratch

    Many of us here are familiar with GitHub, but some of us have been looking for a good, open-source client application for the platform. This is where XDA Senior Member k0sh stepped up and created FastHub. Not only is it fast, easy to navigate, beautifully designed, and open-source, but you can download it from the Play Store or the XDA Labs repository.

  • Chirp is a Simple Electron Twitter Client [Ed: Electron makes it shallow]
  • How to verify a Fedora ISO file
  • Securing Private Keys on a Linux Sysadmin Workstation
  • How to run multiple commands in Linux Simultaneously
  • Enable Nautilus Git Integration with this Open-Source Extension
  • Puppet's Cloud Discovery: Know What's Running in Your Cloud

    The promise of automation always has been its ability to manage a wide range of tasks across all your systems, whether they're in your own data center or somewhere in the cloud. But in order to automate, you need to know what you have, and that's getting harder these days.

    We've all come across orphaned cloud VMs and instances, perhaps spun up for a quick test by a developer, created as a bit of shadow IT or merely forgotten during the press of the latest product release. Regardless of why they were created and forgotten, these instances pose quite a few risks to your time, security and budget. After all, the meter's pretty much always running on cloud instances, orphaned or not.

  • ‘Next generation of Skype’ Unveiled, But Theres No Mention of Linux Support

    Er… Only that’s it; there’s no mention of if, much less when, Linux users will be able to experience the (admittedly terrible) changes.

    For a cross-platform communication service trumpeted as being “available everywhere, so you can go anywhere”, skipping an entire platform is a bit of an oversight.

    Microsoft signs off their announcement by poking the penguin in the eye, saying Skype “…can be with you for all life’s moments, no matter where the world takes you—on your favorite devices, to smart speakers, and beyond.”

    Just not if my ‘favorite devices’ run Linux though, aye?

Leftovers: Software

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Software

Leftovers: Software

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Software
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today's leftovers

'Turbo Boost Max 3.0' and Mesa 17.2.4

  • Turbo Boost Max 3.0 Support For Skylake Fixed With Linux 4.15
    The platform-drivers-x86 updates have been sent in for Linux 4.15 and include a range of improvements for Intel hardware support. One of the bigger items is support for Skylake CPUs with Turbo Boost Max 3.0.
  • Mesa 17.2.4 Graphics Stack Lands for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 Gamers
    Canonical's Timo Aaltonen reports on the availability of the Mesa 17.2.4 open-source graphics drivers stack on the X-SWAT updates PPA for Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and Ubuntu 17.10 systems. Ubuntu systems have always lagged behind the development of the Mesa 3D Graphics Library, the Linux graphics stack containing open-source drivers for Intel, AMD Radeon, and Nvidia GPUs, but they usually catch up with it through a specially crafted PPA (Personal Package Archive) repository that can be easily installed by users.

OSS Leftovers

  • The Future of Marketing Technology Is Headed for an Open-Source Revolution
  • Edging Closer – ODS Sydney
    Despite the fact that OpenStack’s mission statement has not fundamentally changed since the inception of the project in 2010, we have found many different interpretations of the technology through the years. One of them was that OpenStack would be an all-inclusive anything-as-a-service, in a striking parallel to the many different definitions the “cloud” assumed at the time. At the OpenStack Developer Summit in Sydney, we found a project that is returning to its roots: scalable Infrastructure-as-a-Service. It turns out, that resonates well with its user base.
  • Firefox Quantum Now Available on openSUSE Tumbleweed, Linux 4.14 Coming Soon
    Users of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system can now update their computers to the latest and greatest Firefox Quantum web browser.
  • Short Delay with WordPress 4.9
    You may have heard WordPress 4.9 is out. While this seems a good improvement over 4.8, it has a new editor that uses codemirror.  So what’s the problem? Well, inside codemirror is jshint and this has that idiotic no evil license. I think this was added in by WordPress, not codemirror itself. So basically WordPress 4.9 has a file, or actually a tiny part of a file that is non-free.  I’ll now have to delay the update of WordPress to hack that piece out, which probably means removing the javascript linter. Not ideal but that’s the way things go.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers