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Software

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Xen & KVM Changes Line Up For Linux 4.9
  • Ramme is an Open-Source Instagram App for the Desktop

    Ubuntu Phone has an unofficial Instagram app called Instagraph, but (until now) there was no desktop client available for Ubuntu desktop.

    Although Instagram is (imo) best experienced through its official mobile apps, you can login and browse your feed via the Instagram website.

    But, next time you go to reach for your phone or open a new tab to browse your feed, try Ramme instead.

  • WhatsApp Version Free Download and Install Available for Ubuntu / Linux

    WhatsApp, the widely used free messaging system is now available on many platforms and operating systems. Previously, it was only available for the major platforms such as Android and iOS, but it has recently become available for ChromeOS – based devices like the Chromebooks and it seems to continue this trend of availability on as many platforms as possible.

  • Release 1.9.20

    The Wine Staging release 1.9.20 is now available.

  • Wine Staging 1.9.20 Comes Hot on the Heels of Wine 1.9.20 with More Improvements

    The Wine Staging development team announced recently the release and immediate availability of the Wine Staging 1.9.20 maintenance update for GNU/Linux operating systems.

    Coming hot on the heels of the Wine 1.9.20 development release, which brought reimplementation of the clipboard API (Application Programming Interface), message handling in WebServices component, multiple new API Set libraries, as well as a bunch of bug fixes, Wine Staging 1.9.20 adds some improvements on its own end.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Docker 1.12.2 App Container Engine Is Almost Here, Second RC Brings More Fixes

    The development cycle of the Docker 1.12.2 maintenance update to the widely-used open-source and cross-platform application container engine continues with a second Released Candidate, as announced on October 3, 2016, by Docker engineer Victor Vieux.

    Docker 1.12.2 Release Candidate 2 (RC2) comes one week after the unveiling of the first RC milestone, mainly to address more of the bugs and annoyance discovered lately or reported by users since the first point release of the major Docker 1.12 release. Again, the entire changelog is attached below if you like to read the technical details.

    As you might know, Docker 1.12 introduced a lot of exciting new features, such as the built-in orchestration and routing mesh, the brand new Swarm Mode, as well as a bunch of networking improvements for better security. And it looks like Docker 1.12.2 will attempt to further improve the Swarm Mode and networking functionalities.

  • Kodi 17 "Krypton" Beta 3 Adds More PVR and Video Playback Improvements, Bugfixes

    The day of October 5, 2016, also brought us a new Beta of the upcoming Kodi 17 "Krypton" open-source and cross-platform media center software, the third and most probably the last for this development cycle.

    As we told you in the report about the second Beta of Kodi 17, the final release of the popular media center is launching later this fall with numerous new features and improvements in areas like skinning, video playback, PVR/DVR, live TV, music library, etc. Beta 3 comes three weeks after the release of the second Beta milestone, and it includes a bunch of fixes for various issues reported by users since then.

  • Frogr 1.2 released

    Of course, just a few hours after releasing frogr 1.1, I’ve noticed that there was actually no good reason to depend on gettext 0.19.8 for the purposes of removing the intltool dependency only, since 0.19.7 would be enough.

  • Frogr Flickr Uploader for Linux Is Now Available as a Flatpak

    Like most people living in 2016 I don’t use Flickr. But if I did, I’d probably use Frogr to manage and upload my photos. Frogr is one of a few apps that I’ve written about across all 7+ years I’ve run this site.

  • Libvirt 2.3 Virtualization API Released

    The libvirt Linux virtualization API has been updated to version 2.3 today with some new features and plenty of bug fixes.

  • Harmony Music Player Gets A Gorgeous Dark Mode, Other Improvements

    If you're a fan of the Harmony music player then listen up: there's a new update waiting for you to download.

  • This Extension Adds Dynamic Transparency to GNOME Shell’s Top Bar

    Making the GNOME top panel transparent is something a lot of users like to do — but it can look a little out of place when you maximise a window. Dynamic TopBar is a nifty little extension for the GNOME Shell desktop that “makes the top bar transparent when no window is maximized.”

  • ActivityPub and MediaGoblin at TPAC 2016 (or: ActivityPub needs your review!)

    It seems a recurring meme in MediaGoblin land to say “we’ve been quiet, because we’ve been busy” (or maybe historically on every tech blog ever), but I guess I can’t resist repeating the mantra. It’s true! Though the weight of my focus has been shifted from where I expected it to be. From the last few updates over the last year, you would be right to anticipate that the main thing I would be working on would be merging the federation code Jessica has written and getting 1.0 out the door. That was the plan, and we’re still working towards that, but priorities shifted as we realized the opportunities and time pressures we were under with ActivityPub. After the Social Working Group face to face meeting in June, Jessica and I sat down and talked about what we should do. Jessica had recently started working at Igalia (great people!) and was busy with that and other transitions in her life, so we discussed whether we thought it was most sensible to focus my energy on MediaGoblin or on ActivityPub. It was clear that ActivityPub was shaping into a solid specification, but it was also made clear that the Social Working Group’s charter was running out by the end of 2016. We both think ActivityPub is key to MediaGoblin’s success and didn’t want to see our invested time go to waste, so decided my immediate focus should switch to ActivityPub so it could successfully make it as a standard.

    Which isn’t doom and gloom for MediaGoblin! MediaGoblin development has continued… the community is good enough that people have been able to work while I’ve been busy. I’m happy to say we also appointed longtime contributor Boris Bobrov as co-maintainer to help reduce me being a bottleneck. (Thank you Boris, and congrats!) Other contributors have also stepped up to the plate. I’m especially thankful of Ben Sturmfels for hosting MediaGoblin hackathons and being so responsive to community members. (And of course, there are many others to thank, too!)

    Anyway, I’m not going anywhere, I’ve just been shifting focus to standards work for a bit… but it’s all for the greater good of MediaGoblin. (Well, and the greater federated social web!) Soon, we’ll be putting the work we’re doing on ActivityPub directly into MediaGoblin. When we merge Jessica’s work on federation, we will also retool it so that the first federated release of MediaGoblin will be blazing the trails with ActivityPub.

Wireshark 2.2.1 Network Protocol Analyzer Adds Ascend & K12 Capture File Support

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Today, October 5, 2016, the Wireshark development team announced the release of the first maintenance update for the Wireshark 2.2 series of the world's most popular network protocol analyzer software.

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Software and Games

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Software
Gaming

OSS Releases: SOGo, ownCloud, NetBeans IDE

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Software
OSS
  • SOGo v3.2.0 released

    The Inverse team is pleased to announce the immediate availability of SOGo v3.2.0. This is a major release of SOGo which focuses on important new features and improved stability over previous versions.

  • Recent ownCloud Releases

    Even though we just had the nice and successful ownCloud Contributor Conference there have quite some ownCloud releases happened recently. I like to draw your attention to this for a moment, because some people seem to fail to see how active the ownCloud community actually is at the moment.

    There has been the big enterprise release 9.1 on September 20th, but that of course came along with community releases which are in the focus here.

    We had server release 8.0.15, server release 8.1.10, server release 8.2.8 and release 9.0.5. There are maintenance releases for the older major versions, needed to fix bugs on installations that still run on these older versions. We deliver them following this plan.

    The latest and greatest server release is release 9.1.1 that has all the hardening that also went into the enterprise releases.

    Aside a ton of bugfixes that you find listed in the changelog there have also been interesting changes which drive innovation. To pick just one example: The data fingerprint property. It enables the clients to detect if the server got a backup restored, and saves changes on the clients to conflict files if needed. This is a nice example of solutions which are based on feedback from enterprise customers community running ownCloud, who help with reporting problems and proposing solutions.

  • NetBeans IDE 8.2 Download is available now

    NeatBeans doesn't need an introduction but still who doesn't know about NetBeans IDE then NetBeans IDE is an IDE(integrated development environment) that supports multiple programming languages like JAVA,HTML5,JAVAScript,C/C++,PHP etc. Well,It's vastly used by many coders and developers for developing mobile,pc or web applications.
    NetBeans has a great set of pre-installed tools that makes coding and developing more convenient and easy on fingers.The GUI builder really makes the things easy on head when it comes to developing JAVA SE applications.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Tux Paint Needs Mac Devs, Firefox OS Ends & More…

    Tux Paint needs a Mac maintainer: Everybody’s favorite FOSS paint tool is having a little trouble running on Macs these days — specifically on OS X 10.11 El Capitan. Designed with kids in mind, the app is used extensively at schools, with many school systems now upgrading to El Capitan, which was released a year ago.

    Bill Kendrick, the app’s lead developer, took to Facebook last week to explain that the upgrade evidently breaks Tux Paint, and the project doesn’t have a good Mac developer on hand to fix the problem. “Tux Paint works fine,” he wrote, “and packages/installers are maintained for Windows all the way back to Win95, Android, iPhone/iPad, and Debian/Ubuntu and RedHat/Fedora Linuxes. Are there actually Mac developers who care about open source?”

  • GNU Rush Version 1.8 Released
  • FreeIPMI 1.5.4 Released
  • RcppAnnoy 0.0.8

    An new version 0.0.8 of RcppAnnoy, our Rcpp-based R integration of the nifty Annoy library by Erik, is now on CRAN. Annoy is a small, fast, and lightweight C++ template header library for approximate nearest neighbours.

  • Instagraph Adds Photo Filters, Image Cropping and Editing Tools

    Filters, cropping and direct messaging are among the latest improvement arriving in an update to Instagraph, the unofficial third-party Instagram app for Ubuntu Touch. Instagraph 0.0.3 adds much-missed image manipulation tools.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Luatex 1.0.0 announcement

    After some ten years of development and testing, today we have released LuaTeX 1.0.0! Instead of staying below one and ending up with versions like 0.99.1234, we decided that the moment is there to show the TeX audience that LuaTeX is stable enough to loose its beta status. Although functionality has evolved and sometimes been replaced, we have been using LuaTeX in production right from the start. Of course there are bugs and for sure we will fix them.

  • Desktop app snap in 300KB

    KDE Neon developer Harald Sitter was able to package up the KDE calculator, kcalc, in a snap that weighs in at a mere 320KB! How did he do it?

  • 7 Best Free Online Radio Apps for Linux Users

    Music is a breather in this fast life style of us. Music has been in our habits for centuries. In the olden days, it was the stages enact that people enjoyed or the street performers that entertained thousands. With the change in time and technology things are better and faster nowadays. Now, Music is not just meant for entertainment, it became huge business all round the world and has been a very successful industry since then with glamour and style within. Music is a source of stress buster.

    The world has changed from the old days to these days of technologies where people prefer faster and better life. People spend most of their hectic life at work. Although there are several ways of entertainment during the holidays and of the work period, Music is one such source that most people prefer for entertainment. One can enjoy Music in radio and MP3 players which are very popular everywhere nowadays. From shopping malls to multi complexes you can find these radio stations playing all over the places. With a broad range of Music and television serials has been successful in attracting thousands of people all round the world.

  • issue #47: OpenSSL, ripgrep, httpstat, CouchDB, Latency & more!
  • mailcow 0.14 is final
  • BubbleKern

    At ATypI 2016 in Warsaw, Toshi Omagari presented an open-source tool he has developed to partially automate the repetitive task of generating kerning data for fonts. The program is called BubbleKern and, although it does not fully automate the kerning process, it may strike a balance that many font designers find useful.

    Kerning traditionally referred to carving cutouts into the physical metal sorts for particular letters, Omagari said, which we would today refer to as negative sidebearings. It enabled letters with an overhang, like "f", which could otherwise not fit next to standard letters. The wood-type printing era used an approach more like what is done in digital type today, however. Many standard blocks would be cut down so that would fit together more closely. The visual gap between problematic pairs like "AW" is a common example; Omagari showed images of wood-type blocks cut down with carpentry tools to produce a better fit. That fine-tuning is akin to what designers do in digital type.

  • Variations fonts and OpenType 1.8

    The first day of the 2016 ATypI conference was marked by the release of a major update to the OpenType font format. A panel of speakers representing the major players in font technology over the past several decades announced the update together. Although there are several changes under the hood, the key new feature is the ability for a single font file to encode sets of delta values that programs can use to automatically interpolate changes in font weight, width, and other features, each throughout a continuous range. When software support is fully rolled out, that will all but eliminate the need to distribute font families as collections of individual font files, as well as removing many longstanding assumptions about font usage.

  • 11 Best Graphical Git Clients and Git Repository Viewers for Linux

    Git is a free and open source distributed version control system for software development and several other version control tasks. It is designed to cope with everything from small to very large projects based on speed, efficiency and data integrity.

    Linux users can manage Git primarily from the command line, however, there are several graphical user interface (GUI) Git clients that facilitate efficient and reliable usage of Git on a Linux desktop and offer most, if not all of the command line operations.

    Therefore, below is a list of some of the best Git front-ends with a GUI for Linux desktop users.

  • Progress – A Tiny Tool to Monitor Progress for (cp, mv, dd, tar, etc.) Commands in Linux

    Progress, formerly known as Coreutils Viewer, is a light C command that searches for coreutils basic commands such as cp, mv, tar, dd, gzip/gunzip, cat, grep etc currently being executed on the system and shows the percentage of data copied, it only runs on Linux and Mac OS X operating systems.

  • Upcoming Native Xinput Support in WINE

    If you have ever looked at playing games on Linux through WINE, you are probably aware by now that there’s a bunch of hacks involved to getting a Xbox360 pad to work with games. Usually this means grabbing an older version of the little Windows tool called xbox360ce.exe, a few xinput dlls, and a xbox360 configuration file and dump that unholy mix into the Windows’ game’s folder, and pray that everything works as expected. It’s just like witchcraft, except that you won’t be burned for that anymore these days. Honestly, this situation is far from being satisfying. I know we all want clean ports for Linux anyway, but there’s always going to be a ton of games that will never get ported, and WINE can be a good solution for those. The less hackery tricks it needs to support controllers, the better.

  • An Introduction to GNOME Boxes (virtualization) on Linux

    GNOME Boxes is a system virtualization application that is a core part of the GNOME desktop environment. Based on the QEMU machine emulator, it offers a simplified and user-friendly approach to the whole OS virtualization idea. This post is just an introduction to its capabilities and a statement that it finally works in other distributions besides Fedora.

    Once you launch Boxes, you are greeted with a message to press the “New” button to add a new system. Doing so will let the application quickly search in your home folder to find any supported image files. You may either select from the list, navigate your disk, or even insert a URL address.

Say not Goodbye, say Sayonara

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Software

Sayonara is a new little player. But that’s it. If you don’t like its looks or the particular way it brings you songs, there is no reason for you to use it over any other generic player of choice you can find in your distro. Don’t get me wrong, work it does, yes, with an odd error or five, but then every other one offers pretty much the same bevy of features, pretty much the same experience. There’s nothing revolutionary in Sayonara to warrant extra chance, extra time. It’s as good as the rest, and then equally lacking, making it ill suited for the modern aural topography.

Apart from the obvious stability and usability, I would love to see an easy way to integrate online streaming services, an ability to buy music directly through the player, some way to port and sync my collections, as well as better connectivity to external devices. It is Year 2016, and we can’t be so casual about the fact there’s an entire world out there built and designed to be consumed at 0.99 dollars per transaction. I’m not saying that’s all there is, but having this whole new world added into the player, as an optional extra, would make Sayonara far more appealing to a much wider audience. And it could also potentially help transform the world of Linux applications to a higher level. But the investment needed is dauntingly complex and big. Perhaps we won’t see it any time soon. Or maybe we will. Let us see what the next edition of Sayonara brings us. Worth testing, for sure, so do it.

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Wine 1.9.20

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Software and Games

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Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

Linux and FOSS Events

  • Debian SunCamp 2017 Is Taking Place May 18-21 in the Province of Girona, Spain
    It looks like last year's Debian SunCamp event for Debian developers was a total success and Martín Ferrari is back with a new proposal that should take place later this spring during four days full of hacking, socializing, and fun. That's right, we're talking about Debian SunCamp 2017, an event any Debian developer, contributor, or user can attend to meet his or hers Debian buddies, hack together on new projects or improve existing ones by sharing their knowledge, plan upcoming features and discuss ideas for the Debian GNU/Linux operating system.
  • Pieter Hintjens In Memoriam
    Pieter Hintjens was a writer, programmer and thinker who has spent decades building large software systems and on-line communities, which he describes as "Living Systems". He was an expert in distributed computing, having written over 30 protocols and distributed software systems. He designed AMQP in 2004, and founded the ZeroMQ free software project in 2007. He was the author of the O'Reilly ZeroMQ book, "Culture and Empire", "The Psychopath Code", "Social Architecture", and "Confessions of a Necromancer". He was the president of the Foundation for a Free Information Infrastructure (FFII), and fought the software patent directive and the standardisation of the Microsoft OOXML Office format. He also organized the Internet of Things (IOT) Devroom here at FOSDEM for the last 3 years. In April 2016 he was diagnosed with terminal metastasis of a previous cancer.
  • foss-gbg on Wednesday
    The topics are Yocto Linux on FPGA-based hardware, risk and license management in open source projects and a product release by the local start-up Zifra (an encryptable SD-card). More information and free tickets are available at the foss-gbg site.

Leftovers: OSS

  • When Open Source Meets the Enterprise
    Open source solutions have long been an option for the enterprise, but lately it seems they are becoming more of a necessity for advanced data operations than merely a luxury for IT techs who like to play with code. While it’s true that open platforms tend to provide a broader feature set compared to their proprietary brethren, due to their larger and more diverse development communities, this often comes at the cost of increased operational complexity. At a time when most enterprises are looking to shed their responsibilities for infrastructure and architecture to focus instead on core money-making services, open source requires a fairly high level of in-house technical skill. But as data environments become more distributed and reliant upon increasingly complex compilations of third-party systems, open source can provide at least a base layer of commonality for resources that support a given distribution.
  • EngineerBetter CTO: the logical truth about software 'packaging'
    Technologies such as Docker have blended these responsibilities, causing developers to need to care about what operating system and native libraries are available to their applications – after years of the industry striving for more abstraction and increased decoupling!
  • What will we do when everything is automated?
    Just translate the term "productivity of American factories" into the word "automation" and you get the picture. Other workers are not taking jobs away from the gainfully employed, machines are. This is not a new trend. It's been going on since before Eli Whitney invented the cotton gin. Industry creates machines that do the work of humans faster, cheaper, with more accuracy and with less failure. That's the nature of industry—nothing new here. However, what is new is the rate by which the displacement of human beings from the workforce in happening.
  • Want OpenStack benefits? Put your private cloud plan in place first
    The open source software promises hard-to-come-by cloud standards and no vendor lock-in, says Forrester's Lauren Nelson. But there's more to consider -- including containers.
  • Set the Agenda at OpenStack Summit Boston
    The next OpenStack Summit is just three months away now, and as is their custom, the organizers have once again invited you–the OpenStack Community–to vote on which presentations will and will not be featured at the event.
  • What’s new in the world of OpenStack Ambassadors
    Ambassadors act as liaisons between multiple User Groups, the Foundation and the community in their regions. Launched in 2013, the OpenStack Ambassador program aims to create a framework of community leaders to sustainably expand the reach of OpenStack around the world.
  • Boston summit preview, Ambassador program updates, and more OpenStack news

Proprietary Traps and Openwashing

  • Integrate ONLYOFFICE Online Editors with ownCloud [Ed: Proprietary software latches onto FOSS]
    ONLYOFFICE editors and ownCloud is the match made in heaven, wrote once one of our users. Inspired by this idea, we developed an integration app for you to use our online editors in ownCloud web interface.
  • Microsoft India projects itself as open source champion, says AI is the next step [Ed: Microsoft bribes to sabotage FOSS and blackmails it with patents; calls itself "open source"]
  • Open Source WSO2 IoT Server Advances Integration and Analytic Capabilities
    WSO2 has announced a new, fully-open-source WSO2 Internet of Things Server edition that "lowers the barriers to delivering enterprise-grad IoT and mobile solutions."
  • SAP license fees are due even for indirect users, court says
    SAP's named-user licensing fees apply even to related applications that only offer users indirect visibility of SAP data, a U.K. judge ruled Thursday in a case pitting SAP against Diageo, the alcoholic beverage giant behind Smirnoff vodka and Guinness beer. The consequences could be far-reaching for businesses that have integrated their customer-facing systems with an SAP database, potentially leaving them liable for license fees for every customer that accesses their online store. "If any SAP systems are being indirectly triggered, even if incidentally, and from anywhere in the world, then there are uncategorized and unpriced costs stacking up in the background," warned Robin Fry, a director at software licensing consultancy Cerno Professional Services, who has been following the case.
  • “Active Hours” in Windows 10 emphasizes how you are not in control of your own devices
    No edition of Windows 10, except Professional and Enterprise, is expected to function for more than 12 hours of the day. Microsoft most generously lets you set a block of 12 hours where you’re in control of the system, and will reserve the remaining 12 hours for it’s own purposes. How come we’re all fine with this? Windows 10 introduced the concept of “Active Hours”, a period of up to 12 hours when you expect to use the device, meant to reflect your work hours. The settings for changing the device’s active hours is hidden away among Windows Update settings, and it poorly fits with today’s lifestyles. Say you use your PC in the afternoon and into the late evening during the work week, but use it from morning to early afternoon in the weekends. You can’t fit all those hours nor accommodate home office hours in a period of just 12 hours. We’re always connected, and expect our devices to always be there for us when we need them.
  • Chrome 57 Will Permanently Enable DRM
    The next stable version of Chrome (Chrome 57) will not allow users to disable the Widevine DRM plugin anymore, therefore making it an always-on, permanent feature of Chrome. The new version of Chrome will also eliminate the “chrome://plugins” internal URL, which means if you want to disable Flash, you’ll have to do it from the Settings page.