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Software

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • The Atom Editor

    I didn’t set out to write a blog post about a text editor. I was going to write about one of the other awesome projects that the Ops team is doing here at Wombat. Along the way I decided to give Atom a chance again and I’m glad I did. I enjoyed it enough that I thought I would defer my post about automating my “Ops Environment” on a mac (I promise, I’ll do that one soon-ish) in favor of this.

  • Quick Update: ClipGrab and PlayOnLinux Applications Are Now Available For ALL Ubuntu Versions

    ClipGrab is fairly popular application to download video from famous sites of the Internet. It allows you to search video with in application and select to download the video or other way you can copy and paste the video URL to the application to download the video. Since famous video sites are supported by this application, if some site isn't officially supported, you may still be able to download the videos from it.

  • aTunes Enriched Audio Player Now Available For All Current Ubuntu/Linux Mint Versions

    There are wide variety of audio players available for Linux and you may have your favorite one installed on your system. aTunes is not new audio player but its initial release was way back in 2006 and the most recent version was released in June, 2014. In almost two years there is no news on the website or release from developers, well it is open-source released under GPL-V2 license and we don't see any other to carry on the development of this great application. It is written in Java programming language and it's cross-platform available for Linux, Unix, Windows and Mac. It uses Mplayer as its playback engine and supports wide variety of known formats such as: MP3, Ogg Vorbis, FLAC, WMA and other formats.

Wine 2.7 Has Been Released

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Software

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • GJS: What’s next?

    In my last post, I went into detail about all the new stuff that GJS brought to GNOME 3.24. Now, it’s time to talk about the near future: what GJS will bring to GNOME 3.26.

  • Sending SMS from Linux Just Got Easier with Latest Indicator KDE Connect Update

    Indicator KDE Connect now has Google Contacts integration, making it even easier to send text messages from the Linux desktop.

  • Cumulus Qt is a Lightweight Weather App for Linux

    Cumulus Qt is a Qt weather app for the Linux desktop. It's lightweight, has a bold, striking design inspired by Stormcloud, and is very customisable.

  • Vivaldi 1.10 Browser Now in Development, Will Introduce Docked Developer Tools

    Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard just informed us a few moments ago that Vivaldi 1.10 will be the next major version of the free and cross-platform web browser based on the latest Chromium technologies, not Vivaldi 2.0 as many of you have hoped.

    Vivaldi 1.9 just hit the streets the other day as world's first web browser to ship with the Ecosia search engine enabled by default to help reforest the plane, and it now looks like Vivaldi's devs never sleep, and development of Vivaldi 1.10 starts today with the first snapshot, Vivaldi 1.10.829.3, which introduces a long-anticipated feature: Docked Developer Tools!

Leftovers: Software (Subsurface, GRUB, GIMP, and Todo.txt)

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Software
  • Announcing Subsurface 4.6.4

    The Subsurface development team proudly announces the release 4.6.4 of Subsurface, an open source dive log and dive planning program for Windows, Mac and Linux.

  • Subsurface 4.6.4 Open-Source Dive Log and Planning Tool Adds Many Improvements

    The development team behind the Subsurface open-source dive log and dive planning application was proud to announce the immediate availability for download of the Subsurface 4.6.4 release.

    Subsurface 4.6.4 is the latest stable version of the popular program developed by Linus Torvalds in collaboration with other developers, and adds a great number of improvements over previous builds. These include a new planner mode to calculate minimum gas, better handling of notes when replanning dives, as well as support for the border width setting in printing templates.

  • GRUB 2.02 Bootloader Officially Released with ZFS LZ4 & LVM RAID1 Support, More

    The long-anticipated GRUB 2.02 open-source bootloader software project was finally promoted to the stable channel after being in Beta stages of development for the past few years.

    The development team took their time to finalize the release of GRUB 2.02, which should soon make its way into the stable software repositories of your favorite operating system, but it's finally here and we want to thank them for all their hard work and the awesome new features and improvements implemented so far.

  • [New] GIMP review

    GIMP (short for GNU Image Manipulation Program) is a free alternative to Photoshop that more than holds its own. But don't think that the lack of a price tag means GIMP is lacking in features; it packs enough punch to genuinely rival Adobe's imaging behemoth.

    GIMP comes with impressive selection and montage features, various ways to retouch your images, cropping, noise reduction and colour adjustment tools, customisable brushes, gradients and so much more. There's plenty for the more advanced user, too, including layer masks, bezier curves, filters and even an animation package.

  • Todo.txt – A Nifty ToDo Indicator Applet for Ubuntu

    Todo.txt is an extremely simple indicator applet that lets you quickly tick off the tasks contained in your todo.txt file. It lives in the system tray and has options: Edit todo.txt, Clear completed, and refresh.

    Ultimately, its job is to help you edit your todo.txt file and mark tasks as completed without needing to open a full-fledged text editing application.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Luminance HDR 2.5.0 Released, Here’s How to Install it on Ubuntu

    Luminance HDR is an open-source tool that lets you create and edit high-dynamic-range images (HDR) on Linux, Windows and macOS. The app recently got its first major update in several years and I figured it was something a few of you might wanna know about (and hey, we’ve featured a couple of other photography tools recently).

  • SMPlayer 17.4.2 Open-Source Media Player Supports MPlayer's ffhevcvdpau Decoder

    A new stable update of the open-source and cross-platform SMPlayer media player was announced recently, versioned 17.4.2, for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux and Microsoft Windows.

    SMPlayer 17.4.2 is now the latest stable release of the popular media player applications, and it looks like it ships with various exciting improvements and new features. One of these is support for using the ffhevcvdpau decoder from the MPlayer project, but only on Linux-based operating systems.

  • Gyazo – An Easy Way to Capture Screenshots, GIFs and Save Websites

    Gyazo is a screen capturing application with which you can quickly take quality shots of your screen and also create GIFs on the fly with a simple click.

    It is as simple to use as another screen capture tool we wrote on earlier, Peek, but Gyazo seems to have an edge in terms of functionality, customizability, and extension; at least, for now.

  • The many ways of running firefox on OpenBSD

    Maybe i haven't talked about it enough on the lists, but since i've been maintaining the various mozillas in the portstree (cvs log says i started around firefox 3.6.something... 7 years ago. *sigh*) a lot of things changed, so i wanted take the 6.1 release as an occasion to sum up the various ways one could run which version of which firefox on which version of OpenBSD.

GStreamer 1.12 and More

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Software
  • GStreamer 1.12 Multimedia Framework to Support Intel's Media SDK and CineForm

    The GStreamer 1.12 major release is coming next month, but Collabora's Olivier Crête is sharing with us today some of the most important new features implemented so far by various developers.

    Collabora made several contributions to the widely-used open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework, and now that many of you already managed to get an early taste of the new features coming with the GStreamer 1.12 release during the RC (Release Candidate) testing phase, let's take a look at the upcoming changes.

  • Receiving an AES67 stream with GStreamer

    GStreamer is great for all kinds of multimedia applications, but did you know it could also be used to create studio grade professional audio applications? For example, with GStreamer you can easily receive a AES67 stream, the standard which allows inter-operability between different IP based audio networking systems and transfers of live audio between profesionnal grade systems.

Leftovers: Software and Games

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Software
Gaming
  • Xed Text Editor: Can It Really Compete with Gedit and Pluma

    There are many text editors available for Linux such as command line editors (vi, vim, nano and so) and GUI editors (Gedit, Pluma, Kate and so on). Linux always has space for new stuff but Xed isn't new and around from quite sometime.
    Xed text editor offers most of the standard editor features, extending this basic functionality with other features not usually found in simple text editors. It supports editing of multiple text files in a window (using Tabs) just like any other famous text editor. Support to encode UTF-8 files, compare files among others, syntax highlighting of source code, auto indentation and manual indentation, printing, print preview support, and many other standard features.

  • NeuLion MC Encoder V2.5 Adds Live HEVC 4K 10-bit Encoding for Linux Servers
  • Lil Tanks is a well polished and action packed side-scroller available for Linux

    I've been playing Lil Tanks [Steam, Official Site] and I think it's a fantastic side-scrolling action game well worth a look.

  • Phoenix Point from the original creator of X-COM is now crowdfunding on Fig

    I haven't been this excited for quite a while, the original creator of X-COM, Julian Gollop, and the rest of his studio Snapshot Games have put up Phoenix Point for crowdfunding on Fig.

    I'm excited for a number of reasons: It will support Linux, it will be on both GOG & Steam and it looks very much like an evolution of the XCOM.

Top 8 Music Player for Ubuntu and Linux Mint

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Software

What’s music to you? Ask this question to people & answers will different. Some would say that its how they enjoy life, some would say it helps them sleep better after a hard day’s work & for some it just make them feel good about them & their surroundings. It can be said without doubt that everybody loves music in one form or another & Linux lovers are no different.

This post is for those Linux lovers who enjoys music & are looking for a music player for their UBUNTU & Linux Mint systems. Though there are many music players available for Linux lovers but we have prepared a list of ‘Top 8 music players for Ubuntu and Linux Mint‘

Read more

Leftovers: Software

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.