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Software

Shotwell 0.27.0

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Software
GNOME
  • Shotwell 0.27.0
  • GNOME's Shotwell 0.27 Debuts New Features

    GNOME's Shotwell photo manager is out today with a new testing release as it ushers in the v0.27 development series.

    Shotwell 0.27 drops support for the F-Spot importing tool. F-Spot for the forgetful was a GNOME image manager/organizer written in C# but was succeeded by Shotwell since around 2010.

  • Shotwell, GNOME's Open-Source Image Viewer and Organizer, Gets Important Update

    The Shotwell open-source image viewer and organizer that is installed by default in various GNU/Linux distributions has been recently updated to version 0.27, a major release that adds numerous improvements and fixes annoying bugs.

    Shotwell 0.27 is now the latest stable release of the application, and some of the best new features included are faster color transformations, a configurable image background, --fullscreen/-f command-line option for the viewer, as well as histogram and thumbnailer improvements.

Software: Journal Apps, GNU Automake, Weblate, Gammu, and CrashPlan

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Software
  • 5 of the Best Journal Apps for Linux

    Journals can serve a number of functions. They can help you organize your thoughts. They can help you keep track of your day. Sometimes, you just want to get your feelings out onto a page. If you’re a Linux user, you have a few excellent options for composing and compiling your own digital journal on your favorite operating system.

  • GNU Automake 1.15.1 released
  • GNU Automake 1.15.1 Comes After A Stall In The Project

    GNU's Automake 1.15.1 release is now available, which isn't too big on new work but comes after a lack of activity on Automake.

  • Call for Weblate translations

    Weblate 2.15 is almost ready (I expect no further code changes), so it's really great time to contribute to it's translations! Weblate 2.15 should be released early next week.

  • python-gammu for Windows

    It has been few months since I'm providing Windows binaries for Gammu, but other parts of the family were still missing. Today, I'm adding python-gammu.

  • Two Popular Open-Source Apps Are Now Available in the Windows Store
  • Backup your GNU/Linux system with CrashPlan

    Backup, backup, backup...This is the biggest thing that I wish everyone would follow when messing around with your computer, regardless of operating system but especially with GNU/Linux.

    GNU/Linux is fairly stable nowadays, but anyone who uses it regularly knows that this can change in the blink of an eye, and so...backup!

    There are plenty of different ways to backup your system, but one that I have found very easy to use is a piece of software called CrashPlan. CrashPlan is one of very few user-friendly graphical tools to create backups, and it does it’s job well. CrashPlan is available for Windows,Linux, and MacOS.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Open Source Photography Software "Darktable" 2.2.5 has been Released

    Darktable is an open source photography workflow application and RAW developer. A virtual lighttable and darkroom for photographers. It manages your digital negatives in a database, lets you view them through a zoomable lighttable and enables you to develop raw images and enhance them.
    The internal architecture of darktable allows users to easily add modules for all sorts of image processing, from the very simple (crop, exposure, spot removal) to the most advanced (simulation of human night vision).
    The user interface is built around efficient caching of image metadata and mipmaps, all stored in a database. The main focus lies on user interaction, both in terms of a smooth interface design as well as processing speed. High quality output is also goal.

  • Switching to the Mutt Email Client

    It was almost four years ago I switched from webmail to a customized email configuration based on Notmuch and Emacs. Notmuch served as both as a native back-end that provided indexing and tagging, as well as a front-end, written in Emacs Lisp. It dramatically improved my email experience, and I wished I had done it earlier. I’ve really enjoyed having so much direct control over my email.

    However, I’m always fiddling with things — fiddling feels a lot more productive than it actually is — and last month I re-invented my email situation, this time switching to a combination of Mutt, Vim, mu, and tmux. The entirety of my email interface now resides inside a terminal, and I’m enjoying it even more. I feel I’ve “leveled up” again in my email habits.

  • libinput 1.7.901

    The first RC for libinput 1.8 is now available.

  • Valgrind-3.13.0 is available

    We are pleased to announce a new release of Valgrind, version 3.13.0, available from http://www.valgrind.org.

  • Winamp alternative Qmmp 1.1.9 Audio Player for Ubuntu/Linux Mint/other Ubuntu derivatives

    Install QMMP Media Player in Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty/16.10 Yakkety/16.04 Xenial/14.04 Trusty/12.04 Precise/Linux Mint 18/17/13
    Qmmp media player is an audio player which gives feel like winamp or xmms. This program is written with help of Qt library. There are plenty of skins available for Qmmp player.

  • Is Deluge Better Than Any Other Bittorrent Client? Find Out By Yourself

    There are many BitTorrent clients available for Linux and you may have your favorite one installed on your system. Deluge is an open-source BitTorrent client written in Python programming language and its software library written in C++ language which provides the application's networking logic, is connected to one of various front ends (including a text console, a Web interface, and a graphical desktop interface using GTK+) through the project's own Python bindings. It is free licensed under the GNU GPL-v3 and cross-platform available for Linux, FreeBSD, Mac and Windows.

  • i2pd 2.14 released

    i2pd (I2P Daemon) is a full-featured C++ implementation of I2P client.

  • Irssi 1.0.3 Released

    Irssi 1.0.3 has been released. This release fixes two remote crash issue in Irssi as well as a few bug fixes, the most notable that TLS can now be disabled from within the text-UI. There are no new features. All Irssi users should upgrade to this version. See the NEWS for details.

  • A New Version Of WPS Office For Linux Was Just Released

    WPS Office is a well known cross platform office suite which also works on Linux desktop. It’s interface is very much similar to that in Microsoft Office and has similar tools as well.

    We though – and a lot of other users – that the development of WPS office for Linux has stopped a long time ago. Because the last update they released was 1 year ago. Their forums is also full of spam and no one was answering any questions or issues opened there.

Sottware News: VLC, Quod Libet, Gerbera, VirtualBox, FreeCAD, Calibre, GNOME, and LibreOffice

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Software
  • What's the story with VLC?

    VLC is one of the most used software in the world, and it's completely free. Where does it come from? This is your answer ...

  • [Very old] 8 Free Linux BitTorrent Clients For linux users

    BitTorrent is an open source peer-to-peer file protocol for sharing large software and media files. It is a well established protocol which accounts for a significant proportion of internet traffic. Many Linux companies rely on BitTorrent as a key method of distributing their software, relieving the bandwidth burden on their servers. Downloads get faster when there are lots of users downloading and sharing at once. So to provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of 8 polished Linux BitTorrent clients. Hopefully,We think the software presented here represents the big players, and a wide range of interfaces and features.

  • Quod Libet 3.9 Highlights

    (Quod Libet is a audio library tagger, manager, and player for Linux / Windows / macOS)

  • Gerbera v1.0 Released

    I am proud to announce the first release of the Gerbera media server!

    There have been over 340 commits since the last commit on the MediaTomb git. These including porting the build system to cmake, removing lots of bundled code (including libupnp itself), replacing spidermonkey with duktape, code housekeeping, album artwork support, bugfixes and more.

  • VirtualBox: Are You Getting Your Money’s Worth?

    Well of course you are. It’s free, isn’t it? Ok, so then why not double the return on your investment? Why not find out how much more you can accomplish as a VirtualBox power user?

    Oracle’s VirtualBox is easy to install, easy to use, and gives you the ability to run virtual versions of just about any modern operating system from within any other modern operating system. Windows 10 on Ubuntu Linux? I’ve done it myself. FreeBSD on CentOS Linux? Sure, why not?

  • FreeCAD Arch development news - May 2017

    So here we are for our monthly report of what has been going on on the FreeCAD front this month. As usual, I will mostly talk about what I have been doing myself, but don't forget that many people are working on FreeCAD, so there is always much more happening than what I talk about in these notes.

  • 10 Alternative Web browsers for the Linux operating system
  • Top 10 Text Editors for Linux Desktop

    In this article we are going to look at the top 10 text editors for Linux desktop environment. Some text editors are not just a default editor to edit text but also doubles up as an IDE, which makes it quite useful. These are very helpful in developing application in the linux environment and even though there are a lot of text editors out there, we are only going to focus on the ten best text editors for the linux desktop environment. So let’s quickly jump into the list without wasting any more time:

  • [Older] Arcan 0.5.2

    A new version of Arcan has been tagged. There is no demo video or fancy screenshots this time around; those things will have to wait until updates come to the related projects (mainly Durden) in a few weeks. Most of the work that remains on the 0.5 series isn’t much to look at by itself – but is nevertheless conceptually and technically interesting.

  • Ambient Noise (ANoise) Player Fixed For Ubuntu 16.04 And Newer

    Ambient Noise, or ANoise is a simple, lightweight application for playing ambient noises, such as waves, rain, fire, and so on, useful to help you stay focused and boost productivity, or fall asleep.

    The application didn't work in Ubuntu 16.04 and newer until recently, when it was updated to GStreamer 1.0 and Python 3, along with some bug fixes.

  • Calibre 3.0 Adds Support for Reading Books In-Browser on Your Phone or Tablet

    Calibre developer Kovid Goyal unveiled today Calibre 3.0, a major update of the open-source and cross-platform ebook library management application for all GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows computers.

    Compared to the 2.0 series of the app, Calibre 3.0's biggest new feature is an entirely re-written Content Server component that lets users read book in-browser on their phone and tablet devices. Best of all, the implementation also works offline, so you won't need an Internet connection to read your favorite books while on the go.

  • Canonical/GNOME Hackfest, Huge GOG.com Sale & SteamOS Update | This Week in Linux (Ep.4)

    Big Linux Gaming news this week from GOG.com and Valve. In App News, updates from Wireshark and the Tor Browser. GnuPG announced a crowdfunding campaign and KDE Connect has something really cool on the horizon. This week we saw quite a few Distro Releases from Bodhi Linux, KaOS, and ROSA. We got some cool updates from the GNOME team including how Canonical has been working with GNOME to improve many aspects of it. All that and more.

  • Troubleshooting Builder

    If you find yourself needing to troubleshoot Builder (hopefully just during our development cycles) you can now run the command “counters” from the command bar (Ctrl+Enter). This gives you access to some internal counters.

    You can get these out of process too, using dazzle-list-counters PID which cracks open the shared memory page and dumps the counters.

  • GNOME: The Desktop I Don’t Need to Think About

    I moved to GNOME from Xfce a few months ago (spurred by a new desktop machine), but I couldn’t find the time to write up my experiences. Canonical announcing the death of Unity last month seemed like a good to finally get my thoughts down.

    Way back in November, I got a new desktop. My beloved Thinkpad T420 was aging and slightly slow, but since it never left my desk, a small desktop and large monitor seemed to make more sense. I knew from the beginning I was going with GNOME, since it’s always felt fast and wired for people like me, who don’t want to use their mouse. Of course, Xfce has that same kind of configureability, but if I was using new hardware, why not take advantage of the processing power and use something nice looking, like GNOME?

  • LibreOffice Quality Assurance: six months in statistics (part 1)

    During the last six months (from 23 November 2016 to 21 May 2017), many things have happened in LibreOffice and in Bugzilla, its bug tracker, where bugs are reported by users, triaged by the quality assurance (QA) team and finally handled by developers, if needed.

Leftovers: Software, KDE, GNOME, Mozilla...

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Software
  • Atom Editor 1.18 Released with Rich Git Integration

    Y’all love the Atom text editor. You can’t lie. I’ve seen download stats.

    So you’ll be super stoked to know that Atom 1.18 is available for you to download — and it comes with a BIG new feature: git and Github integration.

  • Tomahawk Music Player is “Essentially Abandoned”

    Don’t expect to see any new releases of Tomahawk player, a multi-service music app Windows, Mac and Linux.

    A recent Github commit to the project code announces that the project “is essentially abandoned”.

    “There is noone (sic) working on it. There isn’t much sense in adding any new issues in the issue tracker unless you want to fix them yourself,” the update adds.

  • New in calibre 3.0

    Welcome back, calibre users. It has been almost three years since calibre 2.0. In that time lots has happened. The biggest new feature, which was in development for almost that entire period, is a completely re-written calibre Content server.

  • GCC 6.4 To Be Released In Early July

    Richard Biener has announced plans for releasing GCC 6.4 in the near future as another maintenance update to last year's GCC 6 launch.

  • New projects on Hosted Weblate

    Hosted Weblate provides also free hosting for free software projects. The hosting requests queue was over one month long, so it's time to process it and include new project.

  • Jetico's BestCrypt Container Encryption for Linux

    Cyber-attacks are now constant, threats to privacy are increasing, and more rigid regulations are looming worldwide. To help IT folks relax in the face of these challenges, Jetico updated its BestCrypt Container Encryption solution to include Container Guard.

  • KDE Applications 17.08 Schedule finalized
  • I’m going to Akademy! Neon team and more..

    But all is now well in the land of Scarlett Gately Clark. I have now settled into my new life in beautiful Payson, AZ.

  • Vulkan Support in Qt 5.10 – Part 2

    In Vulkan all per-application state is stored in a VkInstance object, see the the specification for a detailed overview. In Qt, Vulkan instances are represented by QVulkanInstance. This is backed by a QPlatformVulkanInstance following the usual QPA patterns. The platform plugins, at least the ones that are interested in providing Vulkan support, are expected to provide an implementation for it under the hood. As described earlier, this currently covers windows, xcb and android.

  • Making Use Of Vulkan In Qt 5.10
  • GNOME Calendar: The much awaited recurrence-dialog is finally here!

    It’s been quite a while since I last posted here and there’s a reason behind it. Lesson learnt: implementing ‘Evolution Data Server’ API correctly requires lot of effort and also some amount of experimentation. So finally, after a lot of hard work, ‘Editing recurrent events’ is now possible in GNOME Calendar.

  • Container secrets: size allocation, part 6

    We are entering another of the more mysterious areas of GTK+ size allocation. Baselines move widgets from a simple box-with-width-and-height model to one where widgets can be aligned vertically in more interesting ways. The main place where this is matters is text. The readers eye is very sensitive to words moving up and down as you move along a line of text. Baselines are there to avoid that.

  • Todoist Preferences Panel for To Do

    A lot has happened in the first two weeks of coding period and i am excited to share it with everyone. So, for the first two weekend I worked on adding a Preferences Panel that allows users to add/modify Todoist account that they want to use with To Do. Earlier we had planned to make it work in sandboxed environment, but upon mclasen’s suggestion we are sticking with getting the Goa Portal and Todoist account addition to work on non-sandboxed environment first.

  • Firefox 55 Beta Prepping Numerous Changes

    With Firefox 54 having shipped this week, Firefox 55 is now in beta.

Software: Gitter, git-cinnabar 0.5.0 Beta 2, and GitHub's Atom 1.18

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Software
  • Gitter and Mattermost: two desktop apps for your future chat platform

    In the hunt for the perfect communication platform or protocol, a lot of companies are experimenting, which can lead to some confusion as not everyone is moving at the same pace: one team on IRC, another one on Slack, one on “anything but Slack, have you tried Mattermost? It’s almost like RocketChat”. Then, if a platform emerges victorious, come the clients wars: which version, does the web version has less features than the desktop client, what about the mobile client?

  • Announcing git-cinnabar 0.5.0 beta 2

    Git-cinnabar is a git remote helper to interact with mercurial repositories. It allows to clone, pull and push from/to mercurial remote repositories, using git.

  • Atom 1.18

    Today’s Atom 1.18 release introduces Git and GitHub integration right inside your editor!

  • GitHub Improves Launching of Its Atom Editor from Windows Subsystem for Linux

    As teased last month when Atom 1.18 was promoted to the Beta channel, along with the stable Atom 1.17 release, the biggest new feature is the integration of both Git and GitHub straight into the heart of Atom.

    "We’re thrilled to be shipping rich integration with Git and GitHub in Atom 1.18! This is merely the first release but we’re excited about what it already brings to the editor," says Ian Olsen, Atom and Electron developer at GitHub.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • The end for fedfs-utils

    Chuck Lever has announced that the fedfs-utils project, which created utilities for the Federated Filesystem, will no longer be developed.

  • Proposal for end-of-life for fedfs-utils development

    Upstream fedfs-utils has not been under active development for two years or more, and there is a scant user base. I'd like to propose making 0.10 the final major release of fedfs-utils.

  • Tilix Review: One Awesome Terminal Emulator

    Looking for more features than what the default Gnome terminal provides? Let me introduce you to Tilix, a GTK3 tiling terminal emulator for Linux. If you haven’t heard of Tilix, you may recognize it by its old name, Terminix (there was a name change due to trademark infringement). But whatever we call it, this terminal emulator has some great features that even the casual user will find useful.

  • WPS Office for Linux 2016 (Apparently) Released
  • Starting up! [Marble]

    Marble Virtual Globe is an open-source globe that allows users to explore a 3D model of Earth, Mars, Venus, and the Moon, with a wide-variety of maps ranging from political to topographic. This year we will be focusing on its Android version, Marble Maps, and in my case, I am tasked with tidying up the UI, adding features and making sure it's all up to Material Design standards!

  • Integrate Git on Your Nautilus File Manager with This Extension

    Git is a version control system with which you can keep track of changes made to files even as you work with several people on the same directory (or project).

    It is probably no news to you that it is primarily used as a version control mechanism for open-source code and is the backbone of the most referenced website in our articles, GitHub.

  • Hands-on with Chrome’s wild new mobile interface

    As phones get bigger and bigger, putting all the controls at the top of the display—Desktop OS style—becomes less and less ergonomic. Phones like the Galaxy S8 Plus have displays that are about six inches tall, so there is no way most people can reach the top of the display one-handed. It's with this in mind that Google is totally rethinking the Chrome mobile design with a new layout that puts all the controls—even the address bar—at the bottom of the screen.

  • Firefox 54 Web Browser Lands in All Supported Ubuntu Linux Releases, Update Now

    Mozilla launched Firefox 54 web browser the other day for all supported platforms and dubbed it as "the best Firefox ever." The release was made available for download from the browser's official website for Linux, Mac, and Windows OSes.

    The biggest new feature of Firefox 54, the one that makes it "the best Firefox ever," is support for multiple content processes (also known as e10s-multi). In other words, Firefox 54 is the first release of the web browser to use multiple operating system processes for rendering web page content, making it faster and more reliable.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
GNOME
  • Using the latest syslog-ng on Turris Omnia

    The release candidate of version 3.7 of Turris OS – the OpenWRT-based operating system of Turris Omnia routers – is now available. Among many other changes, this updates syslog-ng from version 3.0 to 3.9, so it adds about seven years’ worth of new syslog-ng features, including new parsers, filters, formatting options, destinations, and performance enhancements.

  • Ayatana Indicators

    In the near future various upstream projects related to the Ubuntu desktop experience as we have known it so far may become only sporadically maintained or even fully unmaintained. Ubuntu will switch to the Gnome desktop environment with 18.04 LTS as its default desktop, maybe even earlier. The Application Indicators [1] brought into being by Canonical Ltd. will not be needed in Gnome (AFAIK) any more. We can expect the Application Indicator related projects become unmaintained upstream. (In fact I have recently been offered continuation of upstream maintenance of libdbusmenu).

  • Komorebi – A Beautiful Wallpapers Manager with Parallax Effect for Linux

    You might not be tired of seeing still wallpapers on your desktop just yet but maybe it’s time to move on to backgrounds with cooler features anyway – parallax wallpapers.

  • Restoring tabs

    In order to be able to restore a tab in Nautilus, we have to keep a list with the minimum of information to recover the tab. This means that we’ll store the history, the view before search, in case the closed tab is a search, so that we know what was the view type before searching and last but not least, the location which was closed. Storing the location also means that the window will now keep a reference of the closed locations.

  • An Observation in UI Design

    Reading the GNOME Human Interface Guidelines gives a good idea on how to arrange elements and reduce complexity. The HIGs also emphasize on having a clear goal which helps in deciding which elements need to be arranged at all. But I did not grasp the wideness of being purpose-driven for this goal of the application which might then mean to abstract from technical details on the way. So now I try to explain this observation here.

Proprietary

Leftovers: Software and Games

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • CopyQ -An Advanced Clipboard Manager for Linux

    CopyQ is an advanced clipboard manager with editing and scripting features, that lets you intelligently manipulate your system’s clipboard content and use it within a wide range of applications. It monitors your system’s clipboard and saves its content in a way you can later paste it directly into another application.

  • RcppMsgPack 0.1.1

    A new package! Or at least new on CRAN as the very initial version 0.1.0 had been available via the ghrr drat for over a year. But now we have version 0.1.1 to announce as a CRAN package.

    RcppMspPack provides R with MessagePack header files for use via C++ (or C, if you must) packages such as RcppRedis.

  • Smack v4.2 Introduces OMEMO Support!

    I have the honour to announce the latest release of Smack! Version 4.2 brings among bug fixes and additional features like Explicit Message Encryption (XEP-0380) and Message Processing Hints (XEP-0334) support for OMEMO Multi-End-Message-and-Object encryption (XEP-0384). OMEMO was developed by Andreas Straub for the Conversations messenger (also as a Google Summer of Code project) in 2015. Since then it got quite popular and drew a lot of attention for XMPP in the media. My hope is that my efforts to develop an easy to use Smack module will result in an even broader adoption.

  • Tropico 6 Will Debut With Linux Support Next Year
  • Feral Is Bringing XCOM 2: War of the Chosen To Linux
  • Steam Direct Now Available For More Easily Getting Games On Steam

    Following the retirement of Valve's Steam Greenlight program, Steam Direct is now available as the streamlined, transparent, and accessible method for game developers to bring their games to Steam.

Wine Staging Release 2.10

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Software
  • Wine Staging Release 2.10

    The Wine Staging release 2.10 is now available.

  • Wine-Staging 2.10 Released With macOS Preloader

    Building off last week's Wine 2.10 release is now the adjoining Wine-Staging 2.10 release with various experimental/testing features tacked on.

    New functionality added to Wine-Staging 2.10 includes a macOS preloader, ntoskrnl and winedevice improvements, and various other bug fixes and improvements.

  • Wine 2.10 released, nothing massive this time around

    Wine 2.10 has release recently and this release is one of the less exciting releases for Linux gamers. I imagine the Wine-Staging release isn't far behind now too.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: New Release of HardenedBSD, Windows Leaks Details of Windows Back Doors

  • Stable release: HardenedBSD-stable 11-STABLE v1100054
  • Kaspersky blames NSA hack on infected Microsoft software
    Embattled computer security firm Kaspersky Lab said Thursday that malware-infected Microsoft Office software and not its own was to blame for the hacking theft of top-secret US intelligence materials. Adding tantalizing new details to the cyber-espionage mystery that has rocked the US intelligence community, Kaspersky also said there was a China link to the hack.
  • Investigation Report for the September 2014 Equation malware detection incident in the US
    In early October, a story was published by the Wall Street Journal alleging Kaspersky Lab software was used to siphon classified data from an NSA employee’s home computer system. Given that Kaspersky Lab has been at the forefront of fighting cyberespionage and cybercriminal activities on the Internet for over 20 years now, these allegations were treated very seriously. To assist any independent investigators and all the people who have been asking us questions whether those allegations were true, we decided to conduct an internal investigation to attempt to answer a few questions we had related to the article and some others that followed it:
  • Kaspersky: Clumsy NSA leak snoop's PC was packed with malware
    Kaspersky Lab, the US government's least favorite computer security outfit, has published its full technical report into claims Russian intelligence used its antivirus tools to steal NSA secrets. Last month, anonymous sources alleged that in 2015, an NSA engineer took home a big bunch of the agency's cyber-weapons to work on them on his home Windows PC, which was running the Russian biz's antimalware software – kind of a compliment when you think about it. The classified exploit code and associated documents on the personal system were then slurped by Kremlin spies via his copy of Kaspersky antivirus, it was claimed.

OSS Leftovers

  • Open Source Networking Days: Think Globally, Collaborate Locally
    Something that we’ve learned at The Linux Foundation over the years is that there is just no substitute for periodic, in-person, face-to-face collaboration around the open source technologies that are rapidly changing our world. It’s no different for the open networking projects I work with as end users and their ecosystem partners grapple with the challenges and opportunities of unifying various open source components and finding solutions to accelerate network transformation. This fall, we decided to take The Linux Foundation networking projects (OpenDaylight, ONAP, OPNFV, and others) on the road to Europe and Japan by working with local site hosts and network operators to host Open Source Networking Days in Paris, Milan, Stockholm, London, Tel Aviv, and Yokohama.
  • The Open-Source Driving Simulator That Trains Autonomous Vehicles
    Self-driving cars are set to revolutionize transport systems the world over. If the hype is to be believed, entirely autonomous vehicles are about to hit the open road. The truth is more complex. The most advanced self-driving technologies work only in an extremely limited set of environments and weather conditions. And while most new cars will have some form of driver assistance in the coming years, autonomous cars that drive in all conditions without human oversight are still many years away. One of the main problems is that it is hard to train vehicles to cope in all situations. And the most challenging situations are often the rarest. There is a huge variety of tricky circumstances that drivers rarely come across: a child running into the road, a vehicle driving on the wrong side of the street, an accident immediately ahead, and so on.
  • Fun with Le Potato
    At Linux Plumbers, I ended up with a Le Potato SBC. I hadn't really had time to actually boot it up until now. They support a couple of distributions which seem to work fine if you flash them on. I mostly like SBCs for having actual hardware to test on so my interest tends to be how easily can I get my own kernel running. Most of the support is not upstream right now but it's headed there. The good folks at BayLibre have been working on getting the kernel support upstream and have a tree available for use until then.
  • PyConf Hyderabad 2017
    In the beginning of October, I attended a new PyCon in India, PyConf Hyderabad (no worries, they are working on the name for the next year). I was super excited about this conference, the main reason is being able to meet more Python developers from India. We are a large country, and we certainly need more local conferences :)
  • First Basilisk version released!
    This is the first public version of the Basilisk web browser, building on the new platform in development: UXP (code-named Möbius).
  • Pale Moon Project Rolls Out The Basilisk Browser Project
    The developers behind the Pale Moon web-browser that's been a long standing fork of Firefox have rolled out their first public beta release of their new "Basilisk" browser technology. Basilisk is their new development platform based on their (Gecko-forked) Goanna layout engine and the Unified UXL Platform (UXP) that is a fork of the Mozilla code-base pre-Servo/Rust... Basically for those not liking the direction of Firefox with v57 rolling out the Quantum changes, etc.
  • Best word processor for Mac [iophk: "whole article fails to mention OpenDocument Format"]
  • WordPress 4.9: This one's for you, developers!
    WordPress 4.9 has debuted, and this time the world's most popular content management system has given developers plenty to like. Some of the changes are arguably overdue: syntax highlighting and error checking for CSS editing and cutting custom HTML are neither scarce nor innovative. They'll be welcomed arrival will likely be welcomed anyway, as will newly-granular roles and permissions for developers. The new release has also added version 4.2.6 of MediaElement.js, an upgrade that WordPress.org's release notes stated has removed dependency on jQuery, improves accessibility, modernizes the UI, and fixes many bugs.”
  • New projects on Hosted Weblate
  • Cilk Plus Is Being Dropped From GCC
    Intel deprecated Cilk Plus multi-threading support with GCC 7 and now for GCC 8 they are looking to abandon this support entirely. Cilk Plus only had full support introduced in GCC 5 while now for the GCC 8 release early next year it's looking like it will be dropped entirely.
  • Software Freedom Law Center vs. Software Freedom Conservancy

    On November 3rd, the Software Freedom Conservancy (SFC) wrote a blog post to let people know that the Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC) had begun legal action against them (the SFC) over the trademark for their name.

  • What Is Teletype For Atom? How To Code With Fellow Developers In Real Time?
    In a short period of three years, GitHub’s open source code editor has become one of the most popular options around. In our list of top text editors for Linux, Atom was featured at #2. From time to time, GitHub keeps adding new features to this tool to make it even better. Just recently, with the help of Facebook, GitHub turned Atom into a full-fledged IDE. As GitHub is known to host some of the world’s biggest open source collaborative projects, it makes perfect sense to add the collaborative coding ability to Atom. To make this possible, “Teletype for Atom” has just been announced.
  • Microsoft Is Trying To Make Windows Subsystem For Linux Faster (WSL)
  • Microsoft and GitHub team up to take Git virtual file system to macOS, Linux

Ubuntu: New Users, Unity Remix, 18.04 LTS News

  • How to Get Started With the Ubuntu Linux Distro
    The Linux operating system has evolved from a niche audience to widespread popularity since its creation in the mid 1990s, and with good reason. Once upon a time, that installation process was a challenge, even for those who had plenty of experience with such tasks. The modern day Linux, however, has come a very long way. To that end, the installation of most Linux distributions is about as easy as installing an application. If you can install Microsoft Office or Adobe Photoshop, you can install Linux. Here, we’ll walk you through the process of installing Ubuntu Linux 17.04, which is widely considered one of the most user-friendly distributions. (A distribution is a variation of Linux, and there are hundreds and hundreds to choose from.)
  • An ‘Ubuntu Unity Remix’ Might Be on the Way…
    A new Ubuntu flavor that uses the Unity 7 desktop by default is under discussion. The plans have already won backing from a former Unity developer.
  • Ubuntu News: Get Firefox Quantum Update Now; Ubuntu 18.04 New Icon Theme Confirmed
    Earlier this week, Mozilla earned big praises in the tech world for launching its next-generation Firefox Quantum 57.0 web browser. The browser claims to be faster and better than market leader Google Chrome. Now, Firefox Quantum is available for all supported Ubuntu versions from the official repositories. The Firefox Quantum Update is also now available.
  • New Icon Theme Confirmed for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS
    ‘Suru’ is (apparently) going to be the default icon theme in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. That’s Suru, the rebooted community icon theme and not Suru, the Canonical-created icon theme that shipped on the Ubuntu Phone (and was created by Matthieu James, who recently left Canonical).

OnePlus 5T Launched

  • OnePlus 5T Keeps the Headphone Jack, Introduces Face Unlock and Parallel Apps
    Five months after it launched its OnePlus 5 flagship Android smartphone, OnePlus unveiled today its successor, the OnePlus 5T, running the latest Android 8.0 (Oreo) mobile OS. OnePlus held a live event today in New York City to tell us all about the new features it implemented in the OnePlus 5T, and they don't disappoint as the smartphone features a gorgeous and bright 6.0-inches Optic AMOLED capacitive touchscreen with multitouch, a 1080x2160 pixels resolution, 18:9 ratio, and approximately 402 PPI density. The design has been changed a bit as well for OnePlus 5T, which is made of anodized aluminum.
  • OnePlus 5T Launched: Comes With Bigger Screen, Better Dual Camera, And Face Unlock
    Whenever costly phones like iPhone X or Google Pixel 2 are bashed (here and here) and their alternatives are discussed, OnePlus is always mentioned. In the past few years, the company has amassed a fan base that has found the concept of “Never Settle” impressive.
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