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Software

Multimedia: Recording Audio, VLC Media Player 2.2.5, OpenShot 2.3.2

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Software
  • A simple command-line tool for recording audio

    Machine learning and natural language processing are transforming our relationship with our devices by giving them a human voice. People with visual impairments have especially benefited from these technologies, but those who speak languages like my native Odia have largely been left behind by most voicebanks.

    When T. Shrinivasan, a Tamil-language Wikipedian, started the Voice-recorder-for-tawictionary, he probably didn't realize how useful his open source tool can be for users like me. I was in search of a simple tool that could allow me to record large chunks of words in a short time so that those recordings can be used on Odia Wiktionary, a sister project of Wikipedia and a free dictionary in Odia language that has translations of Odia and other language words.

  • VLC Media Player 2.2.5 Improves Video Scaling in VDPAU, MP3 Playback, and More

    VLC 2.2.5 arrived recently with a great number of improvements over the previous stable update of the open-source, free and cross-platform video player application for GNU/Linux, macOS and Microsoft Windows operating systems.

    In fact, it's been almost a year since VLC 2.2.4 was announced back in early June 2016, and users can now finally update their beloved media player to a newer version that has quite a number of improvements. For example, VLC 2.2.5 improves the MP3 playback quality when the libmad library is used, as well as VDPAU video scalling and the playback of palettized codecs.

  • OpenShot 2.3.2 Open-Source Video Editor Is Out, Addresses a Few Important Issues

    OpenShot developer Jonathan Thomas today announced the release and immediate availability of the first public maintenance update to the OpenShot 2.3 stable series of the open-source and cross-platform video editor.

    OpenShot 2.3 arrived at the end of March 2017 as "one of the biggest updates ever" of the popular and free video editor software that's used with success by many videographers and vloggers on the Open Source community, but also by any home user who wants to edit his/her vacation movies.

Text and Video Editors: WordPress, Atom, and VidCutter

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Software
  • The WordPress Desktop App Is Blazingly Fast, But It’s Not For Me

    Are you a blogger? If so you may be interested to know that the open-source WordPress desktop app is now available as a Snap app. Released on Linux...

  • You Can Now Install the Atom Hackable Text Editor as a Snap on Ubuntu Linux

    Canonical's David Callé is informing the Ubuntu community today that the Atom open-source and cross-platform hackable text editor loved by numerous developers can now be installed in Ubuntu Linux as a Snap.

    Mark Shuttleworth promised to focus on advancing the develop of the Snappy technologies, which allow user to install Snap packages across multiple Linux-based operating systems, so we should see more and more popular apps packaged as Snaps.

  • 3 types of useful Atom text editor packages for writers

    Text editors aren't just something developers use to crank out code. Writers use them, too. A good text editor enables writers to focus on their words, but also packs other features that help them craft and publish their work more efficiently.

    While popular among the techies, GitHub's Atom text editor has evolved into a solid editor for writers, too. That's thanks to Atom's 6,100+ packages, which greatly extend the editor's capabilities.

    Let's look at three types of packages for the Atom text editor that writers of all stripes will find useful.

  • Open-Source Video Trimmer App VidCutter Scores Big Update

    A big update to VidCutter, an open-source video trim, split and merge app, is available to download. VidCutter is a cross-platform Qt5 app for quick video trimming/splitting and merging video clips without the need to re-encode. The app is powered by FFmpeg, which available on almost all major Linux distributions.

OpenShot 2.3.2

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Software
Movies
  • OpenShot 2.3.2 Released

    Version 2.3.2 has been released this evening, and it addresses a few big issues.

  • OpenShot 2.3.2 Video Editor Released

    OpenShot 2.3.2 fixes a crash during undo/redo operations, another crash was fixed with the transform tool, better libopenshot version handling, a smaller package size, and a variety of other fixes.

  • OpenShot 2.3.2 Released with Various Bug Fixes

    A new release of the open-source video editor OpenShot is available to download. The update fixes 'a few big issues', according to its developer.

Proprietary Browsers and Proprietary Games

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Software
Web
Gaming
  • Vivaldi 1.10 Web Browser to Let You Control New Tab Behavior Through Extensions

    The development of the upcoming Vivaldi 1.10 web browser continues at fast pace, and today we see the availability of a new snapshot, versioned 1.10.838.7, which implements more new features, but also fixes several regressions.

    Coming only one week after the previous snapshot, which added a new way to sort downloads, Vivaldi Snapshot 1.10.838.7 is the third in this development cycle, and it attempts to implement a new functionality that promises to allow users to control the behavior of new tabs directly from extensions. It will be located under Settings -> Tabs -> New Tab Page -> Control by Extension.

  • Opera Reborn “rethinks” the browser… with integrated WhatsApp and Facebook

    Vivaldi, which was created by Opera's co-founder and former CEO, continues along its own path, focusing on privacy, security, and interesting enhancements to tabbed browsing. Vivaldi hit version 1.9 last week and now lets you "plant trees as you surf."

  • Wednesday Madness, a quick look at some good Linux gaming deals
  • Project Zomboid adds vehicles in a new beta

    I've tested it and as they mentioned in the announcement forum post, it is an early work in progress. Cars have no sound, sometimes other textures go on top of the car which looks weird and there are other issues. Even so, it's still awesome to finally be able to play around with vehicles to move around the map quicker.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Native color temperature tweaking with Night Light

    RedShift is a utility that we have previously featured here at the Fedora Magazine. It is a small utility that automatically tweaks the color temperature towards the red end of the spectrum after dark. Blue light — which is typically emitted by a monitor — is shown to negatively impact sleep patterns if you are exposed to it after dark. Night Light is a new feature arriving in Fedora 26 Workstation — thanks to it being introduced in GNOME 3.24. Night Light provides the functionality of RedShift without having to install a separate utility or extension.

  • Transfer.sh – Easy And Fast Way to Share Files From The Command-Line
  • What is YOUR Essential FOSS Program?

    We all have at least one or maybe even a handful of programs we seemingly just can't live without. You know, that program that you instantly go looking for as soon as you've installed your new shiny OS (or Linux distribution, more specifically in our case). For me, personally it's the Vim text editor.

    I decided to narrow this down to Free and Open Source Software specifically, as while it's probably not necessary given our audience, it's always possible someone would jump up and say something like 'Adobe Illustrator' is their most essential tool! Which is fine in itself, some people do depend on such tools for their occupation or hobbies.

  • GCC 6/7 Gets A Performance-Sensitive Fix

    A Phoronix reader pointed out a performance regression fix now available for GCC 6 and GCC 7 that could help some rather trivial C code perform much better.

  • Cockpit is now just an apt install away
  • Cockpit Comes To Ubuntu, Easier Linux Server Administration

    Cockpit, the open-source project providing a pleasant web-based administrative interface to Linux systems and developed significantly by Red Hat / Fedora developers, is now officially available in Ubuntu and Debian.

    Cockpit is now available in Debian unstable as well as Ubuntu 17.04 and 17.10 repositories. Details on Cockpit coming to Ubuntu/Debian were shared today on Martin Pitt's blog, a prominent Debian/Ubuntu developer. There is also work on getting the Cockpit packages added to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS backports, but as of writing that has yet to be completed.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Coreboot 4.6 Released
  • 4 terminal applications with great command-line UIs

    In this article, I'll look at a shortcoming of command-line interfaces—discoverability—and a few ways to overcome this problem.

    I love command lines. My first command line was DOS 6.2, back in 1997. I learned the syntax for various commands and showed off how to list hidden files in a directory (attrib). I would carefully craft my commands one character at a time. When I made a mistake, I would proceed to retype the command from the beginning. One fine day someone showed me how to traverse the history using the up and down arrow keys and I was blown away.

  • KStars 2.7.7 Released for Linux, Mac, and Windows!

    I'm glad to announce the release of KStars 2.7.7 for Linux, Mac, and Windows!

    In this release, Robert Lancaster dedicated a lot of time to improving KStars What's Interesting Tool (WIT). It is now significantly improved and offers a rich educational experience to explore the heavens! Users can now explore many naked eye and deep sky objects, in addition to addon catalogs offered by KStars such as the Sharpless Catalog.

    Users wishing to have more fine control on what objects to observe and/or image should be using the Observation Planner that enable filtering of objects with custom constraints and limits. For casual users looking to find out what's interesting tonight, then this tool is the optimal choice.

  • Evolution 3.24.2 Open-Source Email and Groupware Client Brings Many Improvements

    The GNOME Project is preparing these days to release the second and last scheduled point release for the latest GNOME 3.24 desktop environment, and some of the core components and apps are already receiving new versions.

    That's right, we're talking about GNOME 3.24.2, which should be out in the coming days, around the date of May 10, 2017, bringing various small enhancements and bug fixes to some of the components distributed as part of the GNOME 3.24 Stack. The Evolution email and groupware client is, again, among the first to be updated.

  • System76 Preps Consistent GNOME Experience for Their PCs Powered by Ubuntu 17.10

    System76's CEO Carl Richell is reporting today on some of the upcoming changes the Linux hardware company plans to make in regards to the look and feel of the GNOME desktop environment shipping with the next major Ubuntu release.

    As you are very much aware by now, Canonical is moving away from their unique and gorgeous Unity user interface to the GNOME 3 desktop environment for the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, due for release later this year on October 19, 2017.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Yup, This is The Best Sound Converter for Ubuntu

    Though I tend to stream music from the cloud when at my desktop PC, I prefer to download and play local audio files when listening to podcasts and audio books on the move. Earlier this week I needed convert a stack of old audio books from the .m4a format to a more Android-friendly format like .mp3 — and SoundConverter did what I needed effortlessly.

  • Aptik Let You Organize Your Favorite PPAs and Manage Packages Easily

    There are few standard ways to manage sources in Linux operating system, from command-line which can be difficult for some new users and built-in GUI way doesn't offers much (beside add and remove PPA). Aptik application first introduced in 2014 which made its way in community fairly easily. If you use standard version of Ubuntu and have many PPAs added in your system and you want to upgrade then this tools comes very handy and let you upgrade your OS quite easily, once you upgrade the OS you can re-install all the packages which were removed before upgrade or you can choose your strategy for upgrade process. Not only for upgrade, if you have another system that run Linux and you want to transfer packages from one to another then in that case it can be very useful tool.

  • Meet the authors of WikiToLearn: Daniele Pannozzo
  • QtWebKit is coming back (part 2)
  • GNOME Recipes App to Soon Offer More Recipes, Cuisines, and Inline Editing

    GNOME Project's Matthias Clasen is reporting on the development of the recently introduced GNOME Recipes application, an open-source and easy-to-use program that'll help you to discover what to cook.

    GNOME Recipes has been in development during the GNOME 3.24 cycle, with which it was first introduced to the public in its final, production-ready state. The graphical user interface of the app should be very familiar to GNOME users as it resemblance the look and feel of the GNOME Software package manager.

Software Releases: dmenu, debug-me, Xandikos, modulemd, and Go For It

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Software
  • [dmenu] release 4.7

    dmenu 4.7 has just been released.

  • announcing debug-me

    Today I'm excited to release debug-me, a program for secure remote debugging.

  • Xandikos, a new Git-backed CalDAV/CardDAV server

    For the last couple of years, I have self-hosted my calendar and address book data. Originally I just kept local calendars and address books in Evolution, but later I moved to a self-hosted CalDAV/CardDAV server and a plethora of clients.

  • modulemd 1.2.0

    I released modulemd-1.2.0 yesterday, the module metadata reference and its Python manipulation library.

    This version defines two new important sections, artifacts and buildopts, and clarifies & extends the format specification a bit, standardizing several profile names (kudos to Tomáš Tomeček) and explaining module inclusion in a somewhat more verbose way.

  • Go For It – A Modern To-Do List with a Timer

    There are already a good number of to-do list applications for all OS platforms, but this one is different. It has a stylish inbuilt timer.

    Among the many other projects created by Manuel Khel, Go For It! is a stylishly modern to-do list productivity app with an inbuilt timer that helps you keep track of your current tasks.

    The app has three main panels, To-Do which contains your list; Timer, which is where the inbuilt timer lives in; and Done, which lists your completed tasks designed with a strikethrough.

Leftovers: Software and Shows

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Software
  • Google Summer of Code students are announced today

    For Cantor, Rishabh Gupta will "Port all backends of Cantor to Q/K process." For Digikam, Yingjie Liu will make “Face Management Improvements," Ahmed Fathy will enable "Database export to remote network devices using DLNA/UPNP," Swati Lodha will create "Database separation for Similarity" and Shaza Ismail Kaoud will make a "Healing clone tool for dust spots removal."

  • GNOME Recipes growing team

    With the big push towards 1.0 now over, the development in GNOME recipes has moved to a more relaxed pace. But that doesn’t mean that nothing is happening! In fact, our team is growing, we will have two interns joining us this cycle, Ekta and Paxana.

  • Bodhi 2.6.2
  • Episode 46 - Turns out I'm not a bad guy
  • S10E09 – Elfin Moaning Wine

    This week we’ve been teaching kids to program, tinkering with GNOME and Microsoft released Windows 10 S. Intel have a security vulnerability in it’s Active Management Technology and Google have EOL’d all their Nexus devices.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • You Can Now Install Discord App as a Snap on Ubuntu, Other GNU/Linux Distros

    Canonical's David Callé announces that the widely-used Discord app, a free voice and text chat client for gamers on Linux, macOS, and Windows platforms, is now available for installation as a Snap from the Snappy Store.

  • Simplenote, the popular note-taking app, is now available as a Snap on Linux

    Simplenote is one of the most popular note-taking services around, and it’s just gotten easier to use on Linux.

    Launched last year, the official Simplenote Linux app is available as a Snap on Ubuntu and other Linux distributions.

    The simple, straightforward note-taking service offers cloud sync and backup across devices, boasts some minor collaborative sharing features, and throws in fast search and note tagging for efficient organisation.

  • Calibre 2.84 Ebook Management App Updates Kindle Driver, Improves Conversion

    It's been nearly three weeks since the last Calibre update hit the streets, and it's now time to get your hands on a brand new version that adds several features and improves existing functionality.

    Calibre 2.84 was launched today by developer Kovid Goyal, who managed to update the Kindle driver to allow users to also delete the thumbnails of the books that are deleted from the system directory, and improved conversion by making use of the same regexp (regular expression) engine that's being used by the Edit Book tool, which appears to offer better support for Unicode characters.

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