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Software

ownCloud Desktop Client 2.2.4 Released with Updated Dolphin Plugin, Bug Fixes

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Software

ownCloud is still alive and kicking, and they've recently released a new maintenance update of the ownCloud Desktop Client, version 2.2.4, bringing some much-needed improvements and patching various annoying issues.

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Blender 2.78 Open-Source 3D Graphics Software Released with Spherical Stereo VR

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Software

Today, September 30, 2016, the Blender Foundation is proud to release Blender 2.78, the latest stable and most advanced version of the popular, open-source, free, and cross-platform Blender 3D modelling software.

Blender 2.78 comes six months after the release of Blender 2.77, and it's a major update that adds numerous new features and improvements, among which we can mention rendering of spherical stereo images for VR (Virtual Reality), viewport rendering improvements, as well as brand new freehand curves drawing over surfaces.

Moreover, the Grease Pencil received awesome improvements and it now doubles as both an animation and drawing tool, powerful new options have been added for B-Bones, it's now possible to import and export basic operators in the Alembic support, and the Cloth Physics feature received new Simulation Speed option and Dynamic Base Mesh support.

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Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Web Publishing and Development: Free Tools Abound

    Are you involved in DevOps and web development, or are you aiming to be? If so, you're probably very aware of many of the tools from the open standards and open source arenas that can make your work easier. Still, these are always spreading out at a fast clip and there are some applications and tools that are rarely discussed. Here at OStatic, we try to regularly update our collections focused on them. In this post, you'll find our latest roundup of free resources for web development that range from complete online courses available for free to unsung applications.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 6.6.1 Released
  • Skype for Linux Alpha 1.9 Adds a Dark Theme, Notification Muting
  • GNOME Calendar Pencils In Great New Features

    GNOME Calendar is one of the few decent desktop calendaring apps available on Linux — and it's going to get better.

  • The future of GNOME Calendar

    Today, the Calendar Team had the first meeting in history. Isaque, Lapo, Renata, Vamsi and I attended it, and the meeting was extremely productive! In fact, we were able to sketch out the general direction that GNOME Calendar will head towards.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • OVS 2.6 and The First Release of OVN

    In January of 2015, the Open vSwitch team announced that they planned to start a new project within OVS called OVN (Open Virtual Network). The timing could not have been better for me as I was looking around for a new project. I dove in with a goal of figuring out whether OVN could be a promising next generation of Open vSwitch integration for OpenStack and have been contributing to it ever since.

    OVS 2.6.0 has now been released which includes the first non-experimental version of OVN. As a community we have also built integration with OpenStack, Docker, and Kubernetes.

  • RcppCNPy 0.2.6
  • Markoshiki
  • gcbd 0.2.6

    A pure maintenance release 0.2.6 of the gcbd package is now on CRAN. The gcbd proposes a benchmarking framework for LAPACK and BLAS operations (as the library can exchanged in a plug-and-play sense on suitable OSs) and records result in local database. Recent / upcoming changes to DBMI and RSQLite let me to update the package; there are no actual functionality changes in this release.

  • Udisks Indicator Makes Monitoring and Mounting Drives Easy on Ubuntu

    Want to get quick, at-a-glance details about your connected drives while on Ubuntu? A new indicator applet aims to help. UDisks-Indicator is a small panel-based applet that shows disk usage information about mounted partitions.

  • Skype for Linux Alpha 1.9 released with dark theme support and more

    Microsoft today released a new update of Skype for Linux users. Skype for Linux Alpha 1.9 comes with dark theme support, the ability to mute notifications and more. Read the full change log below.

  • Open source tool uses PowerShell to enable vSphere infrastructure as code [Ed: Microsoft ‘open’ code already being used to promote proprietary software with back doors]

Docker 1.12.2 Linux App Container Engine Enters Development, Improves Swarm Mode

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Server
Software

Docker's Victor Vieux announced the other day the release and immediate availability for download of the first RC (Release Candidate) snapshot of the upcoming Docker 1.12.2 open-source application container engine.

The first point release of Docker 1.12, a major branch that introduced built-in orchestration and routing mesh, a brand new Swarm Mode, as well as numerous networking security improvements, Docker 1.12.1, was announced last month on the 18th, and since then the development team never stopped improving the software.

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Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • KDE Kirigami 1.1 UI Framework Released
  • [GNOME Maps:] Planning a trip
  • Etcher Image Writer Is Now Better Than Ever

    Back in may we spotlighted Etcher, a stylish open-source USB image writer app for Windows, macOS and Linux.

    In the months since our feature the app has released a over 10 small beta updates, with Etcher 1.5 Beta being the most recent release at the time of writing.

  • Audacious 3.8 released

    Audacious 3.8 was released on September 21, 2016.

  • New Version of Audacious Music Player Released

    A new version of Audacious, a popular lightweight audio player, is now available for download.

    Audacious 3.8 introduces a small set of features, including the ability to run more than one instance of the app at the same time. Quite why… no idea.

    New audtool commands have been added, including stream recording toggles, and cue sheet support is said to be “more seamless”.

  • Rambox Puts All Your Favorite Messaging Services In One App

    Rambox is a free, open-source messaging and email app that groups all your favourite web apps into one easy-to-manage window.

    Sound familiar?

    We’ve highlighted apps like Rambox before, with Franz and the Gmail-specific Wmail being but two.

  • Stylish Markdown Editor ‘Typora’ Is Now Available for Ubuntu

    In the market for a desktop markdown editor for Linux? You may have helped but notice that you’re rather spoilt for choice. From Abricotine and Scratch to Simplenote, Springseed and Remarkable. Even Gedit can render markdown with the right plugin! With so much choice it can be difficult to know which app to pick.

  • YoutPlayer Floats Your Fave YouTube Videos on The Desktop [Ed: just an Electron app]

    Looking for a neat-o way to play YouTube playlists on your desktop, outside your browser? Take a looksie at Yout, an Electron app that lets you add and watch YouTube playlists on your desktop, floating window stylee. Yout is not the most user-friendly of apps.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Linux Twitter App ‘Corebird’ Now Supports Longer Tweets

    An updated version of the open-source desktop Twitter client Corebird is available for download.

    Corebird 1.3.2 is the second bug-fix release since the release of Corebird 1.3 back in July. It enables support for the social media service’s newer, longer tweets.

    Twitter says the new so-called “expanded tweets” do not count media attachments (photos, GIFs, videos, and polls) towards the 140-character limit. It also says it plans to exclude usernames in replies from the character count too, though an exact date for this has yet to be announced.

  • GTK Radio Player ‘Gradio’ Gets New Beta Release, Gains New Features

    A new beta release of the desktop radio player app GRadio is available for download — and it’s broadcasting a wealth of changes.

    Developer Häcker Felix says the next major stable release needs to deliver ‘a rock-solid stable base for the next versions’, and to do so he needs feedback on how the app is shaping up right now.

  • Kdenlive news and packaging

    Following our last week’s monthly Café, we decided to concentrate on advanced trimming features and if possible an audio mixer for the next Kdenlive 16.12 release. It was also mentionned that several users requested the comeback of the rotoscoping effect, which was lost in the KF5 port, preventing some users to upgrade their Kdenlive version.

digiKam 5.2.0 is published...

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KDE
Software

After a second release 5.1.0 published one month ago, the digiKam team is proud to announce the new release 5.2.0 of digiKam Software Collection. This version introduces a new bugs triage and some fixes following new feedback from end-users.

This release introduce also a new red eyes tool which automatize the red-eyes effect reduction process. Faces detection is processed on whole image and a new algorithm written by a Google Summer of Code 2016 student named Omar Amin is dedicated to recognize shapes and try to found eyes with direct flash reflection on retina.

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Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • What’s new in 389 Directory Server 1.3.5

    As a member of the 389 Directory Server (389DS) core team, I am always excited about our new releases. We have some really great features in 1.3.5. However, our changelogs are always large so I want to just touch on a few of my favourites.

    389 Directory Server is an LDAPv3 compliant server, used around the world for Identity Management, Authentication, Authorisation and much more. It is the foundation of the FreeIPA project’s server. As a result, it’s not something we often think about or even get excited for: but every day many of us rely on 389DS to be correct, secure and fast behind the scenes.

  • Adobe Returns to Linux with the New NPAPI Flash Player After 4 Years
  • Codeweavers CrossOver 15.3.0 for Linux and Mac OSX has been released

    I am delighted to announce that CodeWeavers has just released CrossOver 15.3.0 for both Mac OSX and Linux. CrossOver 15.3.0 has important bug fixes for both Mac and Linux users.

  • Enlightenment EFL Adds Atomic Modesetting, Nuclear Page-Flipping

    The Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL) now has support for atomic mode-setting and nuclear page-flipping!

    This atomic mode-setting and nuclear page-flipping support is designed for the Linux 4.8 kernel and newer and so far has just been tested with the Intel DRM driver.

    Samsung developer Chris Michael commented with the nearly thousand lines of new code that on working systems it provides "buttery smoothness."

  • Kubuntu beta; please test!

    When you run into bugs, try to report them via "apport", which means using ubuntu-bug packagename in the commandline. Once apport has logged into launchpad and downloaded the relevant error messages, you can give some details like a short description of the bug, and can get the number. Please report the bug numbers on the qa site in your test report.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Audacious 3.8 Free Music Player Is Out, Finally Lets You Run Multiple Instances

    A new stable version of the Audacious open-source and cross-platform audio playback application has been announced for both GNU/Linux and Microsoft Windows platforms, version 3.8.

    Audacious 3.8 has been in development since early August when the first Beta milestone was announced, and it received a second Beta build in early September. But now the wait is finally over, and you can get your hands on the final release, which brings tons of new features and improvements.

    Probably the most important change implemented in Audacious 3.8 are the ability to run multiple instances of the application, something that wasn't possible with any of the previous releases except the Beta versions of the 3.8 milestone. Best of all, each running Audacious instance remembers its own configuration.

  • WadC 2.1

    Today I released version 2.1 of Wad Compiler, a lazy functional programming language and IDE for the construction of Doom maps.

  • Vivaldi browser: Interview with Jon Stephenson von Tetzchner

    Vivaldi browser has taken the world of internet browsing by storm, and only months after its initial release it has found its way into the computers of millions of power users. In this interview, Mr.Jon Stephenson von Tetzchner talks about how he got the idea to create this project and what to expect in the future.

  • Chakra GNU/Linux Users Are Getting KDE Plasma 5.7.5 and Applications 16.08.1

    Today, September 22, 2016, Chakra GNU/Linux maintainer Neofytos Kolokotronis announced that the rolling operating system is now getting the latest software updates and technologies.

  • Blender nightly in Flatpak
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More in Tux Machines

KDE Leftovers

  • Integrate Your Android Device With Ubuntu Using KDE Connect Indicator Fork
    KDE Connect is a tool which allows your Android device to integrate with your Linux desktop. With KDE Connect Indicator, you can use KDE Connect on desktop that support AppIndicators, like Unity, Xfce (Xubuntu), and so on.
  • FirstAid – PDF Help Viewer
    in the recent months, I didn’t find much time to spend on Kate/KTextEditor development. But at least I was now able to spend a bit more time on OpenSource & Qt things even during work time in our company. Normally I am stuck there with low level binary or source analysis work. [...] Therefore, as our GUIs are developed with Qt anyways, we did take a look at libpoppler (and its Qt 5 bindings), which is the base of Okular, too.
  • KBibTeX 0.6.1-rc2 released
    After quite some delay, I finally assembled a second release candidate for KBibTeX 0.6.1. Version 0.6.1 will be the last release in the 0.6.x series.
  • Meet KDE at FOSDEM Next Month
    Next month is FOSDEM, the largest gathering of free software developers anywhere in Europe. FOSDEM 2017 is being held at the ULB Campus Solbosch on Saturday 4th and Sunday 5th of February. Thousands of coders, designers, maintainers and managers from projects as popular as Linux and as obscure as Tcl/Tk will descend on the European capital Brussels to talk, present, show off and drink beer.

Leftovers: OSS

  • D-Wave Unveils Open-Source Software for Quantum Computing
    Canada-based D-Wave Systems has released an open-source software tool designed to help developers program quantum computers, Wired reported Wednesday.
  • D-Wave builds open quantum computing software development ecosystem
    D-Wave Systems has released an open source quantum computing chunk of software. Quantum computing, as we know, moves us on from the world of mere 1’s and 0’s in binary to the new level of ‘superposition’ qubits that can represent many more values and therefore more computing power — read this accessible piece for a simple explanation of quantum computing.
  • FOSS Compositing With Natron
    Anyone who likes to work with graphics will at one time or another find compositing software useful. Luckily, FOSS has several of the best in Blender and Natron.
  • Hadoop Creator Doug Cutting: 5 Ways to Be Successful with Open Source in 2017
    Because of my long-standing association with the Apache Software Foundation, I’m often asked the question, “What’s next for open source technology?” My typical response is variations of “I don’t know” to “the possibilities are endless.” Over the past year, we’ve seen open source technology make strong inroads into the mainstream of enterprise technology. Who would have thought that my work on Hadoop ten years ago would impact so many industries – from manufacturing to telecom to finance. They have all taken hold of the powers of the open source ecosystem not only to improve the customer experience, become more innovative and grow the bottom line, but also to support work toward the greater good of society through genomic research, precision medicine and programs to stop human trafficking, as just a few examples. Below I’ve listed five tips for folks who are curious about how to begin working with open source and what to expect from the ever-changing ecosystem.
  • Radio Free HPC Looks at New Open Source Software for Quantum Computing
    In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team looks at D-Wave’s new open source software for quantum computing. The software is available on github along with a whitepaper written by Cray Research alums Mike Booth and Steve Reinhardt.
  • Why events matter and how to do them right
    Marina Paych was a newcomer to open source software when she left a non-governmental organization for a new start in the IT sector—on her birthday, no less. But the real surprise turned out to be open source. Fast forward two years and this head of organizational development runs an entire department, complete with a promotional staff that strategically markets her employer's open source web development services on a worldwide scale.
  • Exploring OpenStack's Trove DBaaS Cloud Servic
    You can install databases such as MySQL, PostgreSQL, or even MongoDB very quickly thanks to package management, but the installation is not even half the battle. A functioning database also needs user accounts and several configuration steps for better performance and security. This need for additional configuration poses challenges in cloud environments. You can always manually install a virtual machine in traditional settings, but cloud users want to generate an entire virtual environment from a template. Manual intervention is difficult or sometimes even impossible.
  • Mobile Edge Computing Creates ‘Tiny Data Centers’ at the Edge
    “Usually access networks include all kinds of encryption and tunneling protocols,” says Fite. “It’s not a standard, native-IP environment.” Saguna’s platform creates a bridge between the access network to a small OpenStack cloud, which works in a standard IP environment. It provides APIs about such things as location, registration for services, traffic direction, radio network services, and available bandwidth.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • Debian Creeps Closer To The Next Release
    I’ve been alarmed by the slow progress of Debian towards the next release. They’ve had several weird gyrations in numbers of “release-critical” bugs and still many packages fail to build from source. Last time this stage, they had only a few hundred bugs to go. Now they are over 600. I guess some of that comes from increasing the number of included packages. There are bound to be more bad interactions, like changing the C compiler. I hate that language which seems to be a moving target… Systemd seems to be smoother but it still gives me problems.
  • Mir: 2016 end of year review
    2016 was a good year for Mir – it is being used in more places, it has more and better upstream support and it is easier to use by downstream projects. 2017 will be even better and will see version 1.0 released.
  • Ubuntu Still Planning For Mir 1.0 In 2017
    Alan Griffiths of Canonical today posted a year-in-review for Mir during 2016 and a look ahead to this year.
  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” KDE – BETA Release

GNU Gimp Development

  • Community-supported development of GEGL now live
    Almost every new major feature people have been asking us for, be it high bit depth support, or full CMYK support, or layer effects, would be impossible without having a robust, capable image processing core. Øyvind Kolås picked up GEGL in mid-2000s and has been working on it in his spare time ever since. He is the author of 42% of commits in GEGL and 50% of commits in babl (pixel data conversion library).
  • 2016 in review
    When we released GIMP 2.9.2 in late 2015 and stepped over into 2016, we already knew that we’d be doing mostly polishing. This turned out to be true to a larger extent, and most of the work we did was under-the-hood changes. But quite a few new features slipped in. So, what are the big user-visible changes for GIMP in 2016?