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Software

Leftovers: Software

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Software

Snappy and Snapper

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Software
  • Snapcraft 1.0 Ubuntu Snappy Creator Tool Officially Released, Here's What's New

    Canonical's Snappy team had the great pleasure of announcing the release and immediate availability for download of the Snapcraft 1.0 Snappy creator tool for Ubuntu Linux.

    Snapcraft 1.0 is the product of many months of hard work, during which the software has had six development builds, bringing as many new features as possible and fixing bugs reported by users during the entire development cycle (see the what's new section below for details).

  • Snapper: SUSE's Ultimate Btrfs Snapshot Manager

    Snapper, the excellent Btrfs management tool, is yet another of SUSE Linux's best-kept secrets.

    I call SUSE the secret Linux, because it's the most advanced Linux distribution, but hardly anyone seems to know about it. SUSE has officially supported Btrfs, the next-generation Linux filesystem, since SLES 11 SP2, and supplies the excellent Snapper tool to manage Btrfs. Grab yourself a free openSUSE download, or a free 60-day SUSE Enterprise Linux evaluation and follow along as we learn how to create and manage snapshots with Snapper.

Leftovers: Software

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Software

Kodi 16.0 and a Rant

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  • Kodi 16.0 Beta 5 "Jarvis" Is the Last One, RCs Will Soon Follow

    Kodi, a media player and entertainment hub that was named XBMC until last year, has been upgraded once more. Developers have pushed the last Beta for the 16.0 branch.

  • Dear Kodi, Where's My Surround?!?!

    I love Kodi. (This is just an evolution of my love for XBMC, since it's the same thing with a new name.) In fact, although I've expressed my love for Plex over and over (and over) the past few years, I still use Kodi as my main interface for the televisions in my house. We gave Plex a try as our main media center software when it was released for TiVo, but after several months, we found its interface to be cumbersome and the transcoding for local media frustrating.

  • Kodi 17 Free and Open-Source Media Center to Be Named "Krypton"

Leftovers: Software

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  • OpenShot 2.0 Beta Finally Released

    What a surprise waking up to find that at long-last the OpenShot 2.0 beta is now available to early-backers of this open-source video editor's Kickstarter project.

    It was just a few days ago mentioning it was one of the letdowns of 2015 -- and non-linear Linux video editors in general. Fortunately, there's some progress to report already for 2016 with the release of their long-awaited beta.

  • Rcpp 0.12.2: Keep rollin'

    The third update in the 0.12.* series of Rcpp arrived on the CRAN network for GNU R earlier today, and has been pushed to Debian. It follows the 0.12.0 release from late July, the 0.12.1 release in September, and the 0.12.2 release in November making it the seventh release at the steady bi-montly release frequency. This release is somewhat more of a maintenance release addressing a number of small bugs and nuisances without adding any new features.

  • MKVToolNix 8.8.0 Open Source MKV Manipulation Tool Has TrueHD Fixes, More

    MKVToolNix 8.8.0 has been released today, January 10, and it comes after only one week from the release of MKVToolNix 8.7.0, as Moritz Bunkus announced earlier on the project's website.

  • Latex2MediaWiki and Google Code-In

    I have to admit that before Google Code-In 2015 I had never heard of Wikitolearn although I had used plasma and other KDE software and also read planetkde. In order to create “a free and user-friendly computing experience” it makes sense to also support projects aiming to create free content. Latex2MediaWiki is used to convert latex documents to the MediaWiki format which is used to contribute to Wikitolearn. However, it is not limited to Wikitolearn as Wikipedia and its sister projects also use MediaWiki.

Leftovers: Software

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  • Uget 2.0.4 (Download Manager) Is Now Available For All The Supported Ubuntu Systems Via PPA
  • Simple Image Resizer (SIR) 3.0 Brings A Few Changes Only

    As you may know, Simple Image Resizer (SIR) is an open source tool written in C++ and created via the Qt GUI toolkit, for batch resizing, rotating and converting images. Also, it has a feature for adding frames or text and apply color and gradient filters to the images, some functions to manipulate the histogram and works with multiple photos by splitting the tasks on the processors.

  • Atom 1.3.3 Has Been Released

    Atom is an open-source, multi-platform text editor developed by GitHub, having a simple and intuitive graphical user interface and a bunch of interesting features for writing: CSS, HTML, JavaScript and other web programming languages. Among others, it has support for macros, auto-completion a split screen feature and it integrates with the file manager.

  • Kobo firmware 3.19.5761 mega update (KSM, nickel patch, ssh, fonts)

    Since 3.18.0 there have been two new firmwares for the Kobo eInk devices. For the very recently released firmware release 3.19.5761 I have updated my collection of patches and features. As with previous mega-package, I prepared updates for all three hardwares, Mark4 (Glo), Mark5 (Aura), and Mark6 (GloHD), but only the one for Mark6 is tested by myself.

  • Telegram 0.9.18 Has Been Released

    Telegram Desktop is an open-source and cross-platform Telegram client for Linux. The client has support for notifications, sending messages and media files, and inserting emoji.

  • Telegram Desktop 0.9.18 Is Available For Ubuntu And Fedora Via PPA And COPR

    Telegram Desktop is an open-source and cross-platform Telegram client for Linux. The client has support for notifications, sending messages and media files, and inserting emoji.

    While the Telegram Desktop client is still under development, it allows the users to send and receive messages from the Linux desktop, has a feature for synching across all the supported platform, so you can read your mobile notifications from both the computer and your phone, without missing anything. Also, it has file transfer support and the users can create groups for up to 200 people and send broadcast messages. Unfortunately, support for sending voice messages has not been implemented yet, the users can only listen or download received voice messages.

  • High DPI with FLTK

    After switchig to a notebook with higher resolution monitor, I noticed, that the FLTK based ICC Examin application looked way too small. Having worked in the last months much with pixel independent resolutions in QML, it was a pain to see the non adapted FLTK GUI. I had the impression, that despite of several years of a very appreciated advancement of monitor technology, some parts of graphics stacks did not move and take advantage. So I became curious on how to solve high DPI support the hard way.

Leftovers: Software

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Software

Wine Announcement

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Software

The Wine development release 1.9.1 is now available.

What's new in this release (see below for details):
- A few more deferred fixes.
- Support for debug registers on x86-64.
- More Shader Model 4 instructions.
- Support for the Mingw ARM toolchain.
- Various bug fixes.

The source is available from the following locations:

http://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/1.9/wine-1.9.1.tar.bz2
http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/1.9/wine-1.9.1.tar.bz2

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Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • AsioHeaders 1.11.0-1

    Making it easier to use C++ in R has been a really nice and rewarding side effect of the work on Rcpp. One really good idea came from something Jay Emerson, Michael Kane and had I kicked about for way too long: shipping Boost headers for easier use by R and CRAN packages (such as their family of packages around bigmemory). The key idea here is headers: Experienced C++ authors such as library writers can organise C++ code in such a way that one can (almost always) get by without any linking. Which makes deployment so much easier in most use cases, and surely also with R which knows how to set an include path.

  • Guvcview 2.0.3 (Open-Source Photo And Video Taking App) Has Been Released

    As you may know, Guvcview is an open source application, developed in GTK+, which enables the users to record videos or take photos via the webcam, set up the video and audio codecs to be used, or set the audio input.

  • Rhythmbox & iPhone sync - Improving
  • Enca 1.18

    It seems that I did mess it up with last version of Enca and it was not possible to install it without error. Now comes hotfix which fixes tat.

    If you don't know Enca, it is an Extremely Naive Charset Analyser. It detects character set and encoding of text files and can also convert them to other encodings using either a built-in converter or external libraries and tools like libiconv, librecode, or cstocs.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Longing to bin Photoshop? Rock-solid GIMP a major leap forward

    Despite its relatively obscure version number, GIMP 2.9.2, released recently, represents a major leap forward for the popular image editing suite.

    Like all odd-numbered GIMP releases, 2.9.2 is considered a technical preview, but the features here will form the base of the stable release GIMP 2.10.

    In the mean time, I've found 2.9.2 to be very stable, though you will need to compile it yourself in most cases.

  • ownCloud 9 Will Be a Cool Release, Says Frank Karlitschek

    It looks like the ownCloud developers will have a great year in 2016, as the company's CTO, Mr. Frank Karlitschek, has just announced on his Twitter account that ownCloud 9 is shaping up really nicely and that it will be a cool release.

  • In Search of a Linux Calendar

    When all is said and done, a calendar app is a calendar app is a calendar app. Except for Sunrise’s propensity for sharing secrets with its cloud based parent calendar, there’s not a nickle’s difference between any of these apps; they all do the same thing in basically the same way. I’ve put my affinity for KOrganizer aside for the time being and have settled in with Lightening, mainly because of its tight integration with Thunderbird. Among other thing, that means I won’t have to remember to open it, as it’ll be there automatically as a tab on Thunderbird, so I might even find myself using it.

    I’m not uninstalling KOrganizer however. I might yet change my mind.

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More in Tux Machines

Black Lab Brings Real-Time Kernel Patching to Its Enterprise Desktop 8 Linux OS

A few moments ago, Softpedia has been informed by Black Lab Software about the general availability of the sixth DP (Developer Preview) build of the upcoming Black Lab Linux Enterprise Desktop 8 OS. Sporting a new kernel from the Linux kernel from the 4.2 series, Black Lab Linux Enterprise Desktop 8 Developer Preview 6 arrives today for early adopters and public beta testers with real-time kernel patching, which means that you won't have to reboot your Black Lab Linux Enterprise OS after kernel upgrades. "DP6 offers you a window into what's new and whats coming when Black Lab Enterprise Desktop and Black Lab Enterprise Desktop for Education is released. As with our other developer previews it also aids in porting your applications to the new environment," said Roberto J. Dohnert, CEO, Black Lab Software. Read more

USB stick brings neural computing functions to devices

Movidius unveiled a “Fathom” USB stick and software framework for integrating accelerated neural networking processing into embedded and mobile devices. On April 28, Movidius announced availability of the USB-interfaced “Fathom Neural Compute Stick,” along with an underlying Fathom deep learning software framework. The device is billed as “the world’s first embedded neural network accelerator,” capable of allowing “powerful neural networks to be moved out of the cloud, and deployed natively in end-user devices.” Read more

ImageMagick Security Bug Puts Sites at Risk

  • Open Source ImageMagick Security Bug Puts Sites at Risk
    ImageMagick, an open source suite of tools for working with graphic images used by a large number of websites, has been found to contain a serious security vulnerability that puts sites using the software at risk for malicious code to be executed onsite. Security experts consider exploitation to be so easy they’re calling it “trivial,” and exploits are already circulating in the wild. The biggest risk is to sites that allows users to upload their own image files. Information about the vulnerability was made public Tuesday afternoon by Ryan Huber, a developer and security researcher, who wrote that he had little choice but to post about the exploit.
  • Huge number of sites imperiled by critical image-processing vulnerability
    A large number of websites are vulnerable to a simple attack that allows hackers to execute malicious code hidden inside booby-trapped images. The vulnerability resides in ImageMagick, a widely used image-processing library that's supported by PHP, Ruby, NodeJS, Python, and about a dozen other languages. Many social media and blogging sites, as well as a large number of content management systems, directly or indirectly rely on ImageMagick-based processing so they can resize images uploaded by end users.
  • Extreme photo-bombing: Bad ImageMagick bug puts countless websites at risk of hijacking
    A wildly popular software tool used by websites to process people's photos can be exploited to execute malicious code on servers and leak server-side files. Security bugs in the software are apparently being exploited in the wild right now to compromise at-risk systems. Patches to address the vulnerabilities are available in the latest source code – but are incomplete and have not been officially released, we're told.

Canonical to Offer Snappy Ubuntu 16 Images for Raspberry Pi 2, DragonBoard 410c

As you may know (or not), the Ubuntu Online Summit for Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) is taking place these days, between May 3 and May 5, on the Ubuntu On Air channel, where the Ubuntu devs are laying down plans for the future. We've already reported the other day that the next major release of the popular Linux kernel-based operating system, Ubuntu 16.10, which has been dubbed by Canonical and Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth as Yakkety Yak, won't ship with the long-anticipated Unity 8 desktop interface as the default session. Read more