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Software

Software: ScreenCloud, BleachBit and MP4Tools

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Software
  • ScreenCloud is an open source image capturing tool that can optionally upload images to Google Drive, OneDrive, Dropbox, Imgur

    We have reviewed many screen capturing tools at gHacks including Ksnip, Automatic Screenshotter, Auto Screen Capture, Ashampoo's Snap 11, or Martin's favorite program PicPick.

    [...]

    To finalize it, copy and paste the authorization code generated by the cloud service into the box that the program opened for connecting to your account. You may choose the screenshot naming pattern such as Screenshot at %H-%M-%S representing the time (hours, minutes, seconds) when the screenshot was taken. The result will be something like Screenshot at 19-45-00. Select the folder name that the application should save content to, and whether you want it to copy the public link to the clipboard after the uploading process has been completed.

    Hit the save button and you're all set to use it.

    The application isn't portable. The lack of a crop tool in ScreenCloud's editor was a slight let down for me, but this is intended to be a basic screen capturing tool, besides I'm too used to ShareX's options.

  • BleachBit 3.9.0 Beta

    Designed for Linux and Windows systems, it wipes clean thousands of applications including Firefox, Internet Explorer, Adobe Flash, Google Chrome, Opera, Safari, and more. Beyond simply deleting files, BleachBit includes advanced features such as shredding files to prevent recovery, wiping free disk space to hide traces of files deleted by other applications, and vacuuming Firefox to make it faster. Better than free, BleachBit is open source.

  • MP4Tools is an open source set of utilities for merging or splitting video files

    Note: The application kept crashing when the play button was used. But it works just fine when adding split points, and the split process was successful. I'm not sure why it crashed, especially since the preview panel displayed the frames of the split points correctly. A quick search on the program's SourceForge page revealed a similar issue reported by a user. This suggests that it could be a bug in the latest version.

    [...]

    Both programs in the MP4Tools suite use FFMPEG for encoding videos. MP4Tools is a 32-bit software. It is available for Windows and macOS. Linux users will have to compile it from the source code. It is not a portable application.

50+ Essential Linux Apps[2020] for your Linux Distro

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GNU
Linux
Software

Best Linux Apps 2020: Welcome to Tec Robust. This article is going to be a long stretch of best and essential Linux Applications 2020 for your Linux Distribution. It covers applications for Distros such as Ubuntu, Fedora, OpenSUSE, CentOS, Elementary OS, Zorin OS, Debian, Kubuntu, and more. Without any more delay, we will get into the article. Equip your Linux with the best applications listed down here.

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Software: Ardour, Collabora Online and GNU

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Software
  • Development update: 6.0-pre1 now ready for testing

    Well folks, we’ve done it. After two and a half years of development that has both excluded a few hoped-for features and also expanded to include many things not originally envisaged, we’re ready for people to start testing version 6.0-pre1. Please note: this is NOT the release of 6.0 - we’re now entering a testing phase that will continue through several “-preN” versions until we’re confident that it’s ready for release.

    The nightly version is now (as ever) available at nightly.ardour.org. If you’re a subscriber (or paid US$45 or more for a pre-built version of 5.x), you can download the fully functional version. Others can get the free/demo version which periodically goes silent. Obviously, since this is a nightly version, it will be updated most days to reflect any new development work and fixes as we move towards the actual release of 6.0.

  • Ardour 6.0 Digital Audio Workstation Sees First Pre-Release

    Following two and a half years of development, the first pre-release of the forthcoming Ardour 6.0 digital audio workstation is now available for testing.

  • New integration test framework in Collabora Online.

    At Collabora, we invest a lot of hard work to make LibreOffice's features available in an online environment. Recently we greatly improved the Collabora Online mobile UI, so it's more smooth to use it from a mobile device. While putting more and more work into the software, trying to support more and more different platforms, we need also to spend time improving the test frameworks we use for automatic testing. These test frameworks make sure that while we enrich the software with new features, the software remains stable during the continuous development process.

  • GNU Spotlight with Mike Gerwitz: 15 new GNU releases in March!

    automake-1.16.2
    bison-3.5.3
    coreutils-8.32
    ddrescue-1.25
    gcc-9.3.0
    guile-3.0.1
    gwl-0.2.1
    help2man-1.47.13
    hyperbole-7.1.1
    jacal-1c7
    mailutils-3.9
    mtools-4.0.24
    nano-4.9
    parallel-20200322
    swbis-1.13.2

Wine Announcement: 5.5 Release

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Software

The Wine development release 5.5 is now available.

What's new in this release (see below for details):
  - Builtin libraries use the new UCRTBase C runtime.
  - Compatibility mode used when reporting Windows version.
  - Better support for debug information in PE files.
  - Support for linguistic case mappings.
  - More attributes supported in WebServices.
  - Various bug fixes.

The source is available from the following locations:

  https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.5.tar.xz
  http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.5.tar.xz

Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:

  https://www.winehq.org/download

You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation

You can also get the current source directly from the git
repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.

Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.

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Also: Wine 5.5 Released With Expanded UCRTBase C Runtime Usage, Usual Assortment Of Fixes

13 Nifty Free Image Viewers

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Software

One of our favorite adages is “A picture is worth a thousand words”. It refers to the notion that a still image can convey a complex idea. Images can portray a lot of information quickly and more efficiently than text. They capture memories, and never let you forget something you want to remember, and refresh it in your memory.

Images are part of every day internet usage, and are particularly important for social media engagement. A good image viewer is an essential part of any operating system.

Linux offers a vast collection of open source small utilities that perform functions ranging from the obvious to the bizarre. It is the quality and selection of these tools that help Linux stand out as a productive environment. This is particularly true when it comes to image viewers. There are so many image viewers that are available for Linux that it can make selection difficult.

From our detailed investigations, we strongly recommend feh if you’re looking for a command-line based viewer. If you insist on a graphical user interface, plump for gThumb and/or QuickViewer. There’s other good free and open source image viewers which we’ve also compared.

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15 Open Source Rescue Solutions For Companies Working Remotely under a Lockdown or Quarantine

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Software

The Covid-19 virus that has been spreading all around the world has forced people to stay in their homes. Unfortunately, this caused a lot of businesses to stop functioning, as their employees can no longer reach their work office. What made things worse was that most companies weren't really ready to do a full technological transfer to remote work in such short amount of time.

However, one will have to adapt to the new situation so that they don't get out of business. And to help you with issue, we are here today to present some open source solutions to help companies work remotely.

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Also: Best free project management software

qBittorrent v4.2.2 release

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Software
Web

There's a "qBittorrent" app on the Windows Store which costs money. It isn't an official release nor it is coming from us. The person publicizing it doesn't have permission to use the qBittorrent name/logo.

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Also: qBittorrent 4.2.2 Released! How to Install it via PPA

Internet: Remote Work, Daniel Stenberg on Curl and QUIC/HTTP/3

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Software
Web
  • Our Essential List of Free Software for Remote Work

    Team chat has already become an essential tool for teams looking to be more collaborative and less reliant on email. At Purism we use Matrix for team chat, 1 to 1 calls, video conferencing via Jitsi (open source video conferencing), adhoc file sharing and all our community chat channels. Matrix is a distributed (federated) network, similar to email, which means you can communicate across Matrix servers and compatible services.

    You can self host Matrix or use a public instance like our own free Librem Chat service part of Librem One. All the goodness of Matrix conveniently hosted for you and accessible with one account that also gives you access to Librem Social, our hosted Mastodon instance, and our premium services: end-to-end encrypted email and VPN.

    [...]

    Most office-based teams already have email and things like a company newsletter but we thought we’d share how we manage ours. Our company email and Librem Mail are powered by Dovecot and we use GNU Mailman for our newsletter and mailing lists.

  • Daniel Stenberg: A curl dashboard

    When I wrote up my looong blog post for the curl’s 22nd anniversary, I vacuumed my home directories for all the leftover scripts and partial hacks I’d used in the past to produce graphs over all sorts of things in the curl project. Being slightly obsessed with graphs, that means I got a whole bunch of them.

    I made graphs with libreoffice

    I dusted them off and made sure they all created a decent CSV output that I could use. I imported that data into libreoffice’s calc spreadsheet program and created the graphs that way. That was fun and I was happy with the results – and I could also manually annotate them with additional info. I then created a new git repository for the purpose of hosting the statistics scripts and related tools and pushed my scripts to it. Well, at least all the ones that seemed to work and were the most fun.

    Having done the hard work once, it felt a little sad to just have that single moment snapshot of the project at the exact time I created the graphs, just before curl’s twenty-second birthday. Surely it would be cooler to have them updated automatically?

  • A QUIC look at HTTP/3

    Each HTTP session requires a TCP connection which, in turn, requires a three-way handshake to set up. Once that is done, "we can send data in a reliable data stream", Stenberg explained. TCP transmits data in the clear, so everyone can read what is transferred; the same thus holds true for the non-encrypted HTTP protocol. However, 80% of requests today are using the encrypted version, called Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS), according to statistics of Mozilla (Firefox users) and Google (Chrome users). "The web is getting more and more encrypted", Stenberg explained. HTTPS uses Transport Layer Security (TLS); it adds security on the top of the stack of protocols, which are (in order): IP, TCP, TLS, and HTTP. The cost of TLS is another handshake that increases the latency. In return, we get privacy, security, and "you know you're talking to the right server".

    HTTP/1 required clients to establish one new TCP connection per object, meaning that for each request, the browser needed to create a connection, send the request, read the response, then close it. "TCP is very inefficient in the beginning", Stenberg explained; connections transmit data slowly just after being established, then increase the speed until they discover what the link can support. With only one object to fetch before closing the connection, TCP was never getting up to speed. In addition, a typical web page includes many elements, including JavaScript files, images, stylesheets, and so on. Fetching one object at a time is slow, so browser developers responded by creating multiple connections in parallel.

    That created too many connections to be handled by the servers, so typically the number of connections for each client was limited. The browser had to choose which of its few allowed connections to use for the next object; that led to the so-called "head-of-line blocking" problem. Think of a supermarket checkout line; you might choose the one that looks shortest, only to be stuck behind a customer with some sort of complicated problem. A big TCP efficiency improvement was added for HTTP/1.1 in 1997: open TCP connections can be reused for other requests. That improved the slow-start problem, but not the head-of-line blocking issue, which can be made even worse.

Intel: Bleujour, IWD and OpenSWR

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Hardware
Software
  • Fanless Whiskey Lake mini-PCs include a model based on Intel NUC Elements

    Bleujour has launched a $836 and up “Kubb Passive” NUC system and is prepping an even smaller NUC Elements based Meta U mini-PC, both of which run Linux Mint on Intel’s Whiskey Lake.

    If you’re spending more time than usual on your computer in these days of quarantine, you may ask yourself: Why does my computer have to be so ugly? French embedded vendor Bleujour, which is known for its cutting-edge enclosure designs, would answer “C’est absurde!” In other words, your computer need not be ugly so long as you’re willing to pay a bit more for style.

  • Intel IWD 1.6 Wireless Daemon Released With MAC Randomization, Per-Network MAC Addresses

    Intel open-source developers have released IWD v1.6 as their open-source, embedded-friendly wireless daemon for Linux systems as an alternative to WPA_Supplicant.

    IWD 1.6 comes with some practical additions for privacy-minded users. IWD 1.6 now allows full MAC address randomization each time it (re)connects to a network as well as a per-network MAC address override option too.

  • Intel Working On OpenGL 4.x Support For Their OpenSWR Software Rasterizer In Mesa

    Intel is working to enable OpenGL 4.x functionality for their OpenSWR software rasterizer within Mesa.

    Intel has begun publishing their slide decks and other information they were preparing for the GDC game developer conference before it was cancelled. This included an update on the oneAPI rendering toolkit. Much of the information is a repeat for anyone familiar with the likes of OpenVKL, Embree, and OSPray. The presentation can be found on devmesh.intel.com for those interested.

Cartesi Launches Linux Infrastructure For Developing Blockchain DApps

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Development
GNU
Linux
Software

“We are excited to be launching the first-ever Linux infrastructure that runs on top of a blockchain, while we complete our second round of funding,” says Cartesi CEO Erick de Moura. “Blockchains and decentralization will allow for a new exciting range of applications, but with the current state of DApps, the space is very limited, making it very difficult for mainstream adoption. So, we are striving to create serious change and increase the viability of DApp development on top of a blockchain.”

Currently, it is possible to develop directly on the blockchain, but the process is complex, lengthy, and the applications are left with very limited computational capabilities. As blockchain moves out of the shadows and into mainstream consciousness; programming and developing infrastructure must adapt to the new technology for other, non-crypto purposes.

Cartesi brings all the tools and capabilities available in modern operating systems to the decentralized web. The company’s solution provides a legitimate and fully-fledged Linux OS that magnifies the capabilities of decentralized applications without compromising on the security guarantees of blockchain. Cartesi enables programmers to code decentralized applications seamlessly, while maintaining the appeal of mainstream web apps. Moreover, Cartesi will reduce the barrier of entry for mainstream developers and veterans, by eliminating the need to learn new programming languages and domain-specific tools that often present limitations and a steep learning curve.

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Also: The shelves may be empty, but the disk is full: Not even Linux can resist the bork at times

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