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Wine 1.9.11

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Software
  • Wine 1.9.11 Has Direct3D 11 Improvements

    Out now is Wine 1.9.11 and its release has improvements in its Direct3D 11 support, but still it doesn't appear that Wine is ready yet for handling all the latest D3D11 AAA games.

    The official Wine 1.9.11 announcement mentions "various Direct3D 11 improvements" along with better support for long URLs in WinInet, down-mixing support in DirectSound, cosmetic improvements to desktop mode, and bug fixes. In total there are 21 known bug fixes for this new development release.

  • Wine Announcement
  • Wine 1.9.11 Gets Direct3D 11 Improvements, DirectSound Down-Mixing Support

    The Wine team announced the release of the eleventh milestone towards Wine 2.0, adding more improvements and fixing issues with various Windows applications and games.

    Release highlights of Wine 1.9.11 include several improvements to the Direct3D 11 implementation, down-mixing support in DirectSound, various enhancements to the desktop mode, as well as better support for long URLs in the WinInet component.

  • The Wine Development Release 1.9.11 Is Now Available

    The Wine team released today another development release of their software. Version 1.9.11 has many small changes including 21 bugfixes.

Leftovers: Software (Nginx, GitLab, Gammu)

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Software
  • Nginx 1.11 Web Server Released

    Version 1.11 of the open-source, high-performance Nginx web-server is now available.

    Nginx 1.11 presents a new transparent parameter for several options, support for loading multiple certificates of different types, various other security-related changes, a $proxy_protocol_port variable, some HTTP/2 changes, and more.

  • GitLab 8.8 released with Pipelines and .gitignore templates

    Fresh off our third GitLab Summit, this time in Austin, Texas, we are releasing our 54th consecutive release on the 22nd of the month. Sunday or not, we are not slowing our release schedule and are excited to show you what we're launching today. GitLab 8.8 is ready to go with GitLab CI improvements, performance enhancements, convenient templates, and more!

  • Gammu release day

    There has been some silence on the Gammu release front and it's time to change that. Today all Gammu, python-gammu and Wammu have been released. As you might guess all are bugfix releases.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Handling I/O Bursts With QEMU 2.6

    The recent release of QEMU 2.6 has support for allowing guests to do bursts of I/O for a configurable amount of time, whereby the I/O level exceeds the normally allowed limits.

    Our friends at the consulting firm Igalia have written a blog post about I/O bursts with QEMU 2.6.

  • Shotwell's New Devs Are Doing a Terrific Job, Facebook Integration Works Again

    Shotwell developer Jens Georg announced earlier, May 23, 2016, the general availability of the first point release in the Shotwell 0.23.x stable series of the popular open-source image viewer and organizer software.

    Shotwell is being used by default in numerous GNU/Linux operating system, including the widely used Ubuntu, but it was abandoned by its developers from the Yorba Foundation a while ago, during which it didn't receive any attention.

    At the end of April 2016, a group of open source developers decided to take over the maintenance of Shotwell from where Yorba left off, and we already reported on the release of the major Shotwell 0.23.0 version.

  • FreeIPMI 1.5.2 Released

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • Roundcube Webmail 1.2.0 released

    We proudly announce the stable version 1.2.0 of Roundcube Webmail which is now available for download. It introduces new features since version 1.1 covering security and PGP encryption topics...

  • Roundcube Webmail 1.2 Adds PGP Encryption

    For those using the open-source Roundcube software for your webmail needs, Roundcube 1.2 is now available as the latest stable version.

  • Systemd 230 Opens Up A New Graphics Vulnerability & FBDEV Still Should Die

    A change made in the recent release of systemd 230 makes it easy for rogue user processes to be able to spy on your desktop, assuming a few conditions are met.

    If you are using FBDEV, such as with Wayland's Weston FBDEV back-end, other user processes can now read from the frame-buffer device. The change in systemd is, "Framebuffer devices (/dev/fb*) and 3D printers and scanners (devices tagged with ID_MAKER_TOOL) are now tagged with 'uaccess' and are available to logged in users."

  • systemd 230 Launches with DNSSEC Enabled by Default in systemd-resolved, More
  • 7 Best Command Line Navigation Tools

    The desktop environment with its bundle of programs sharing a common graphical user interface (GUI) remains a firm favorite with users. Not surprising really given that a good desktop environment makes computing fun and simple. The graphical desktop environment has become so ingrained in almost everyone's computer activities that it might seem the command line will wither away. Yet, there is still an important role to play for the humble command-line interface (CLI).

  • GNU Parallel 20160522 ('TTIPleaks') released

    GNU Parallel 20160522 ('TTIPleaks') has been released.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • G'MIC 1.7.1

    A new version 1.7.1 “Spring 2016” of G’MIC (GREYC’s Magic for Image Computing), the open-source framework for image processing, has been released recently (26 April 2016). This is a great opportunity to summarize some of the latest advances and features over the last 5 months.

  • Veracrypt is a Cross-Platform Alternative Encryption Tool to Truecrypt For LInux

    Filesystem/Volume encryption has become paramount to the masses in the IT industry due to the varying advantages it presents including protection of sensitive data, military-grade encryption standards, password keys to prevent unwanted access, and an encrypted file/drive only the encryption software can access among others.

    A few days back, we briefly reviewed Truecrypt as a secure software encryption tool.

  • Geary: A Great Email Client for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Geary Email client is my by same developers who created Shotwell application, it is lightweight and open source email reader alternative to Thunderbird and others. Geary works with most popular webmail services, including Gmail, Yahoo and Outlook, as well as providing IMAP and SMTP support which means you can setup manual IMAP mail service for other providers. Basically it is inspired from webmail client like Gmail, it organizes mails into 'conversations' rather than threads. Conversation styles threading keeps things tidy and neat - quite useful on mailing lists.

  • Mattermost 3.0: Multi-Team Accounts, Japanese, Mobile & Desktop Upgrades, Integrations for Outlook, Ruby & Rust

    Mattermost 3.0 offers a long awaited features: multi-team accounts, Japanese language translation, and full width display, plus upgrades to apps for iOS, Android, Windows, Linux and Mac, emojis, and we have new integrations for Outlook, Ruby & Rust.

  • netdata for IoT
  • Overview of "secure" desktop messengers
  • 3 More VoIP Alternatives to Skype

    Skype is a very well known voice over IP service that is as well cross-platform, the client on Linux however, it is rather unpleasant to use and mostly buggy with way fewer features than its counterparts on other platforms.

    Previously I covered Ring which is a secure cross-platform alternative to Skype, but then there are even more functional optional softwares to Skype that are rather uncommon and I ‘ll be featuring just three of them (which i term as the best) on this list.

  • Kiwix Provides Offline Access to The Entire Wikipedia Encyclopedia

    The internet is by far a well-rounded source to get information on just about anything you might be needing info on. The internet is, however, extremely broad and doesn’t in fact, give you specifics on some info you might be searching for.

    This is where Wikipedia comes in. Wikipedia is a free encyclopedia that is ultimately a part of the internet but it narrows down your search to exactly what it is that you may be searching for and this is why it’s used by millions around the world.

  • SOGo v3.1.0 released

    The Inverse team is pleased to announce the immediate availability of SOGo v3.1.0. This is a major release of SOGo which focuses on important new features and improved stability over previous versions.

  • Rhythmbox Alternative Toolbar Plugin 0.17.1 Released With Options To Use Dark Theme And Vertical Categories

    Alternative Toobar is a plugin that enhances the Rhythmbox play controls and interface, including optional headerbars for GNOME-based desktops.

  • Tool To Display Keystrokes In Screencasts `Screenkey` 0.9 Released [PPA]

    Screenkey itself can't be used to create screencasts, its use is to display your keystrokes on the screen. To record your Linux desktop, I recommend SimpleScreenRecorder.

  • Top 15 file compression utilities in Linux

    File compression is a routine task for most of the Administrators and normal users, to save disk space and to move data from one location to another safer location, this compression utility is used. from historical point of view tar utility was developed to get sequential data backup and it was stored in magnetic tape drives. To send data via internet the compression utility play an important role, it can hold multiple files together and will reduce the overall file size, this can save both the time and internet bandwidth, Linux comes with very quick and effective tools which can reduce file sizes from 40 to 80 percent. In this article we will discuss top 15 utilities in Linux available for users.

  • Google Drive For Linux is Here… Unofficially

    Three years ago, when a user would attempt to download the Google Drive client from their Linux computer, Google would bring them to the appropriate download page, which of course landed them on a page with a message read: “Not (yet) supported for Linux.” What’s the deal with Google not developing a sync client for Linux users, seeing as to how they build a lot of their things using Linux? There’s one simple answer to that, unfortunately. Windows is mainstream, so a lot of their focus is put towards what a majority of people use. The bigger the market, the more money in their pockets. But don’t fear, change is near!

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • PeaZip

    Free of charge for any use and free of any kind of advertising bundle, PeaZip is an open-source (LGPL) file archiver, a free alternative to software like WinRar and WinZip, for Linux and Windows.

  • OpenEMR 4.2.2 is released

    The OpenEMR community has released version 4.2.2. This new version is 2014 ONC Certified as a Modular EHR. OpenEMR 4.2.2 has numerous new features including 30 language translations, a new modern user interface, and fully supports PHP7 and the most recent versions of MySQL and MariaDB. OpenEMR 4.2.2 can be downloaded from the OpenEMR Project website at www.open-emr.org . Thanks goes to the OpenEMR community for producing this release.

  • Calibre 2.57 eBook Management Software Adds Driver for the BQ Cervantes 3 Reader

    Calibre developer Kovid Goyal has just announced today, May 20, 2016, a new version of his outstanding ebook library management software for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows.

  • The LM-Sensors Project Site Doesn't Look Like It's Coming Back

    It's been a year since the last LM-Sensors release and the project isn't as vibrant or active as it once was while the project site has been down for a while now and it doesn't appear to be coming back.

    There hasn't been a major LM-Sensors release to talk about in a year and the sensors mailing list has just turned to a collection of spam. Their project site, LM-Sensors.org, has been down for several weeks as noted by various emails from Phoronix readers.

Wine-Staging 1.9.10

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Software

Leftovers: Software

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Software

Leftovers: Software

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Software

Wine 1.9.10

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Software
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today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS

  • Report: If DOD Doesn't Embrace Open Source, It'll 'Be Left Behind'
    Unless the Defense Department and its military components levy increased importance on software development, they risk losing military technical superiority, according to a new report from the Center for a New American Security. In the report, the Washington, D.C.-based bipartisan think tank argues the Pentagon, which for years has relied heavily on proprietary software systems, “must actively embrace open source software” and buck the status quo. Currently, DOD uses open source software “infrequently and on an ad hoc basis,” unlike tech companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook that wouldn’t exist without open source software.
  • The Honey Trap of Copy/Pasting Open Source Code
    I couldn’t agree more with Bill Sourour’s article ‘Copy.Paste.Code?’ which says that copying and pasting code snippets from sources like Google and StackOverflow is fine as long as you understand how they work. However, the same logic can’t be applied to open source code. When I started open source coding at the tender age of fourteen, I was none the wiser to the pitfalls of copy/pasting open source code. I took it for granted that if a particular snippet performed my desired function, I could just insert it into my code, revelling in the fact that I'd just gotten one step closer to getting my software up and running. Yet, since then, through much trial and error, I’ve learned a thing or two about how to use open source code effectively.
  • Affordable, Open Source, 3D Printable CNC Machine is Now on Kickstarter
    The appeals of Kickstarter campaigns are many. There are the rewards for backers, frequently taking the form of either deep discounts on the final product or unusual items that can’t be found anywhere else. Pledging to support any crowdfunding campaign is a gamble, but it’s an exciting gamble; just browsing Kickstarter is pretty exciting, in fact, especially in the technological categories. Inventive individuals and startups offer new twists on machines like 3D printers and CNC machines – often for much less cost than others on the market.
  • Open Standards and Open Source
    Much has changed in the telecommunications industry in the years since Standards Development Organization (SDOs) such as 3GPP, ITU and OMA were formed. In the early days of telecom and the Internet, as fundamental technology was being invented, it was imperative for the growth of the new markets that standards were established prior to large-scale deployment of technology and related services. The process for development of these standards followed a traditional "waterfall" approach, which helped to harmonize (sometimes competing) pre-standard technical solutions to market needs.

Leftovers: BSD

  • The Voicemail Scammers Never Got Past Our OpenBSD Greylisting
    We usually don't see much of the scammy spam and malware. But that one time we went looking for them, we found a campaign where our OpenBSD greylisting setup was 100% effective in stopping the miscreants' messages. During August 23rd to August 24th 2016, a spam campaign was executed with what appears to have been a ransomware payload. I had not noticed anything particularly unusual about the bsdly.net and friends setup that morning, but then Xavier Mertens' post at isc.sans.edu Voice Message Notifications Deliver Ransomware caught my attention in the tweetstream, and I decided to have a look.
  • Why FreeBSD Doesn't Aim For OpenMP Support Out-Of-The-Box

Security Leftovers

  • FBI detects breaches against two state voter systems
    The Federal Bureau of Investigation has found breaches in Illinois and Arizona's voter registration databases and is urging states to increase computer security ahead of the Nov. 8 presidential election, according to a U.S. official familiar with the probe. The official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said on Monday that investigators were also seeking evidence of whether other states may have been targeted. The FBI warning in an Aug. 18 flash alert from the agency's Cyber Division did not identify the intruders or the two states targeted. Reuters obtained a copy of the document after Yahoo News first reported the story Monday.
  • Russians Hacked Two U.S. Voter Databases, Say Officials [Ed: blaming without evidence again]
    Two other officials said that U.S. intelligence agencies have not yet concluded that the Russian government is trying to do that, but they are worried about it.
  • FBI Says Foreign Hackers Got Into Election Computers
    We've written probably hundreds of stories on just what a dumb idea electronic voting systems are, highlighting how poorly implemented they are, and how easily hacked. And, yet, despite lots of security experts sounding the alarm over and over again, you still get election officials ridiculously declaring that their own systems are somehow hack proof. And now, along comes the FBI to alert people that it's discovered at least two state election computer systems have been hacked already, and both by foreign entities.
  • Researchers Reveal SDN Security Vulnerability, Propose Solution
    Three Italian researchers have published a paper highlighting a security vulnerability in software-defined networking (SDN) that isn't intrinsic to legacy networks. It's not a showstopper, though, and they propose a solution to protect against it. "It" is a new attack they call Know Your Enemy (KYE), through which the bad guys could potentially collect information about a network, such as security tool configuration data that could, for example, reveal attack detection thresholds for network security scanning tools. Or the collected information could be more general in nature, such as quality-of-service or network virtualization policies.
  • NV Gains Momentum for a Secure DMZ
    When it comes to making the shift to network virtualization (NV) and software-defined networking (SDN), one of the approaches gaining momentum is using virtualization technology to build a secure demilitarized zone (DMZ) in the data center. Historically, there have been two major drawbacks to deploying firewalls as a secure mechanism inside a data center. The first is the impact a physical hardware appliance has on application performance once another network hop gets introduced. The second is the complexity associated with managing the firewall rules. NV technologies make it possible to employ virtual firewalls that can be attached to specific applications and segregate them based on risk. This is the concept of building a secure DMZ in the data center. The end result is that the virtual firewall is not only capable of examining every packet associated with a specific application, but keeping track of what specific firewall rules are associated with a particular application becomes much simpler.