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A Review of Bluefish

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Bluefish, the GTK-based text editor tailored for dynamic web programming, includes most standard features like syntax highlighting and multiple documents, but also some very neat features such as integrated documentation, boilerplate code, and dialogs and wizards. In this article, we will evaluate Bluefish's unique features as well as its shortcomings.

First look: Dropline GNOME 2.14.0

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Dropline 2.14.0, released last month, lets you add the GNOME desktop environment to Slackware. It consists of 271 compressed package format files on a single CD. Using dropline on top of Slackware is like putting icing on a cake.

MySQL issues security fix

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MySQL has issued a security update to address flaws in its client-server protocol that could allow a malicious attacker to exploit buffer overflow vulnerabilities and gain access to sensitive information.

Simple package management with Synaptic

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Synaptic is a graphical user interface (GUI) for managing software packages on Debian-based distributions. If you are using Debian or Ubuntu you will easily find Synaptic in the System Tools menu or in the Administration menu. Synaptic uses the GTK graphic libraries (GNOME’s ones) . So, if you are using GNOME on your debian-based distro you will probably have Synaptic installed as well.

Bibble 4.7: RAW power for penguins

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Bibble Labs has released Bibble 4.7, a commercial program for processing and conversion of RAW digital photography files to publishable formats such as JPG, PNG, and TIFF. Since professional photo editing programs are far and few between on Linux, I decided to take a look at Bibble's Linux version to see how it handles.

First look at Vim 7

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The final release of Vim 7 is just around the corner, and it brings a number of new features to the venerable editor, including spell checking, omni completion for several programming and markup languages, tab pages, undo branches, and several other features that are worth upgrading for. Let's take a look at what's new in 7.0.

Music Collection Sharing With Rhythmbox

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The traditional way of sharing a collection of audio files across a local network is by sharing the directory that contains them, so that everybody can access these files. This works well, but I guess it’s time to move on to the next level of music sharing through the Digital Audio Access Protocol (DAAP).

Linux Gets Native WiFi Support

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WiFi on Linux got a major boost today, as Devicescape Software donated technology to allow WiFi to run natively for the first time.

Tips and Tricks: Using GRUB with XFS

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I've installed Breezy quite a few times already, and I know that by default it chooses GRUB as its boot manager. So I was really surprised when I found that LILO, rather than GRUB, wound up on my friend's hard disk. Was I hallucinating? Had I been kidnapped by aliens, and they were now controlling my brain with radio waves? Perhaps, but even after I put on my tinfoil hat, LILO was still there.

A First Look at LyX

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Whether you are writing technical documentation, an article, CV, letter, or thesis, working with LyX, the free, fully-featured cross-platform document processor, can increase your productivity immensely. In this introductory tutorial, we'll see how to get started with LyX, and explore a few of its big features and drawbacks.

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Overland, Lutris, Dead Cells and Fossilize

  • The impressive squad-based survival strategy game Overland to release this autumn
    Overland from Finji is a beautiful looking and impressive squad-based strategy game and they've now announced a release window.
  • The open source game manager Lutris had another sweet update recently
    What's that, too many launchers or no easy way to manage GOG games on Linux? Lutris might solve this problem for you. Giving you the ability to install and manage games from Steam, GOG, Humble Store, Emulators and more it's a pretty handy application to keep around. This latest release is mostly improving on existing features like downloading the default Wine version when not already available, preventing duplicated entries when importing games from a 3rd party, one search bar to rule them all, improved log handling performance, using your discrete GPU by default on compatible systems and more.
  • Dead Cells - Rise of the Giant free DLC to release this week, over 1 million copies sold
    Ready for just one more run? The Dead Cells - Rise of the Giant free DLC is releasing this week (March 28th) as Motion Twin celebrate good sales. The developer spoke at GDC and they went on to mention that Dead Cells has now officially sold over 1 million copies! Around 60% of that was on PC too, so the indie market for good games is still alive and well by the looks of it.
  • Fossilize Is Valve's Latest Open-Source Vulkan Project
    Valve Software has been backing work on Fossilize as an open-source project providing a serialization format for persistent Vulkan object types. Valve has been backing Hans-Kristian Arntzen to work on this Vulkan project while it has also seen commits by their in-house Vulkan guru Dan Ginsburg. The Fossilize library and Vulkan layer is intended so these persistent Vulkan persistent object types can be backed by the pipeline cache, a Vulkan layer to capture the cache, and the ability to replay the cache on different devices without having to run the application itself.

Graphics: Wayland and Vulkan

  • Canonical Reportedly Not Planning To Enable Wayland-By-Default For Ubuntu 20.04 LTS
    Since the short-lived Ubuntu 17.10 GNOME + Wayland experience, the Ubuntu desktop has still been using the trusted X.Org Server session by default. While Ubuntu 19.04 will soon be shipping and the Ubuntu 19.10 development cycle then getting underway, don't look for any Wayland-by-default change to be around the corner. Twice in the past week I've received communication from two indicating that Canonical reportedly isn't planning on enabling Wayland-by-default for Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. If Canonical were planning to go ahead with Wayland used by default, they would need to make the change for Ubuntu 19.10 as is customary for them to make large changes in the LTS-release-1 version in order to facilitate more widespread testing ahead of the Long Term Support cycle. But Canonical engineers feel that the Wayland support isn't mature enough to enable in the next year for Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.
  • Vulkan Working To Expose Video Encode/Decode, Machine Learning
    During this week's Game Developers Conference was the usual Khronos Dev Day where Vulkan, WebGL, glTF, and OpenXR took center stage. During the Vulkan State of the Union some details on their future endeavors were covered. Among some of the larger efforts that are "in flight" are improving the portability of Vulkan to closed platforms without native drivers (MoltenVK, etc), continuing to work on ray-tracing (complementing the existing VK_NV_ray_tracing), exposing video encode/decode through Vulkan, exposing machine learning capabilities, and the separate effort on safety critical Vulkan.

OSS: Blockchain, DeepBrain, Redox OS, OpenBuilds, Red Hat Summit and FOSSASIA

  • It's About Time DApps Unlocked the Mass-Market Momentum for Blockchain
    There’s more to Blockchain technology than Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. At its fundamental level, Blockchain technology engenders trusts in inherently trustless environments. Protocol blockchains such as Bitcoin, Ethereum, EOS, GoChain, Steem and xDai have provided a launchpad for developers to work on DApps. DApps are typically open source applications not owned by anyone, immune from downtimes; and that cannot be shut down by a government or its agencies. The rapid proliferation of Decentralized Applications (DApps) powered a bull run in cryptocurrencies in 2017. Right now, there are more than 2000 DApps designed to solve specific market problems across industries such as health, data storage, finance, gaming, and governance.
  • DeepBrain Chain outlines release of DBC 0.3.6.0 beta in progress report
    DeepBrain Chain detailed the release of DBC 0.3.6.0 beta of its AI Training Net, which allows users to rent computing power to train artificial intelligence algorithms. DeepBrain Chain claimed numerous feature inclusions and and improvements, many pertaining to the scheduling and activation of tasks. In DBC 0.3.6.0, if an AI training task has been stopped a specified period of time, its storage will be deleted automatically. However, the task can be restarted at any time before deletion. If a node has been restarted, reactivation of any previous training tasks will require manual user authorization. [...] A decision was made recently by the community concerning the open source licensing of DeepBrain Chain’s code. Over 55 percent of the members polled voted to not make the code fully open source by the end of March.
  • Redox OS 0.5.0
    It has been one year and four days since the last release of Redox OS! In this time, we have been hard at work improving the Redox ecosystem. Much of this work was related to relibc, a new C library written in Rust and maintained by the Redox OS project, and adding new packages to the cookbook. We are proud to report that we have now far exceeded the capabilities of newlib, which we were using as our system C library before. We have added many important libraries and programs, which you can see listed below.
  • Redox OS 0.5 Released With New C Library Written In Rust
    It's been just over one year since the previous release of Redox OS while today this Rust-written operating system has finally been succeeded by Redox OS 0.5.  It's taken a while since the previous release of Redox OS as they have been focusing their attention on Relibc, a C library implementation written within the Rust programming language. Relibc is now used as the operating system's default C library.
  • Get Moving with New Software from OpenBuilds
    If you’re reading Hackaday, you’ve probably heard of OpenBuilds. Even if the name doesn’t sound familiar, you’ve absolutely seen something on these pages that was built with their components. Not only is OpenBuilds a fantastic place to get steppers, linear rails, lead screws, pulleys, wheels, and whatever else you need to make your project go, they’re also home to an active forum of people who are passionate about developing open source machines. As if that wasn’t enough reason to head over to the OpenBuilds website, [Peter Van Der Walt] recently wrote in to tell us about some new free and open source software he and the team have been working on that’s designed to make it easier than ever to get your creations cutting, lasing, milling, and whatever else you could possibly imagine. If you’ve got a machine that moves, they’ve got some tools you’ll probably want to check out.
  • Dive into developer-focused sessions at Red Hat Summit
    Red Hat Summit is just around the corner, and it’s shaping up to be best Red Hat developer event ever. This year, attendees will get to choose from more than 300 sessions, not to mention booth presentations, parties, labs, and training. To help you cut through the clutter, we’ve created a list of developer specific activities and sessions that will help you shape your Red Hat Summit experience. Most of these sessions are part of the Cloud-Native App Dev track, with a few other sessions that we think will appeal to you as a developer. For more information on these sessions, visit the Red Hat Summit session listing page and sort by “cloud-native app dev” track.
  • 10th year of FOSSASIA
    This FOSSASIA was special as it marked its 10th year! It was quite impressive to witness a FOSS conference to continue growing this long with growing community. The four day conference schedule was packed with various interesting talks, workshops, hackathon and other engaging activities.

Reducing sysadmin toil with Kubernetes controllers

Kubernetes is a platform for reducing toil cunningly disguised as a platform for running containers. The element that allows for both running containers and reducing toil is the Kubernetes concept of a Controller. [...] The canonical example of this in action is in how we manage Pods in Kubernetes. A Pod is effectively a running copy of an application that a specific worker node is asked to run. If that application crashes, the kubelet running on that node will start it again. However, if that node crashes, the Pod is not recovered, as the control loop (via the kubelet process) responsible for the resource no longer exists. To make applications more resilient, Kubernetes has the ReplicaSet controller. The ReplicaSet controller is bundled inside the Kubernetes controller-manager, which runs on the Kubernetes master node and contains the controllers for these more advanced resources. The ReplicaSet controller is responsible for ensuring that a set number of copies of your application is always running. To do this, the ReplicaSet controller requests that a given number of Pods is created. It then routinely checks that the correct number of Pods is still running and will request more Pods or destroy existing Pods to do so. By requesting a ReplicaSet from Kubernetes, you get a self-healing deployment of your application. You can further add lifecycle management to your workload by requesting a Deployment, which is a controller that manages ReplicaSets and provides rolling upgrades by managing multiple versions of your application's ReplicaSets. Read more