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Software

Leftovers: Software and Games

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Software
Gaming
  • Best Linux remote desktop clients: Top 5 RDC in 2017

    This article was provided to TechRadar by Linux Format, the number one magazine to boost your knowledge on Linux, open source developments, distro releases and much more. Subscribe to the print or digital version of Linux Format here.

    SSH has been the staple remote access tool for the sysadmins since its advent. The cryptographic network protocol is synonymous with remote network services over an unsecured network. Admins use SSH to mount remote directories, backup remote servers, spring-clean remote databases, and even forward X11 connections. The popularity of single-board computers, such as the Raspberry Pi, has introduced SSH into the parlance of the everyday desktop users as well.

  • A Powerful Dual-Pane File Manager `Double Commander` New Update for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Double Commander is a powerful open source & cross platform file manager, inspired from total commander file manager but includes new ideas and features. It brings dual pane side by side experience to enhance the use of GUI for the user. The main window of the application is separated by two panels side by side that allow you to view the content of two different location or same and browse through folders with ease. For each file, image or folder, details such as name, extension, size, date and attributes are displayed in the list.

  • SoftMaker Office 2016 – Your alternative to LibreOffice?

    Depending on how you look at it, the world of office suites for Linux is either very rich or very poor. As the rather obscure idiom says: the tailor (hence the cliche suit reference) always goes naked. But in essence, you’re either using LibreOffice – used to be OpenOffice – or maybe something else. Probably nothing.

    However, there are quite a few office products for Linux: Kingsoft Office, SoftMaker Office, Calligra, standalone Abiword, some others, each offering a slightly different aesthetic and functional approach. We talked about this in the office suite competition article back in 2013, and a lot has changed since. LibreOffice finally became suitable for use side by side with Microsoft Office, as far as decent document conversion and fidelity go, and every one of these products has seen a large number of major and minor number increments. In the original piece, SoftMaker Office was kind of a dud, and it’s time to give it a full review. Let us.

  • Reports: PS4 is selling twice as well as Xbox One, overall [Ed: Xbox continues to be a loser]

    Microsoft stopped providing concrete sales data for its Xbox line years ago, making it hard to get a read on just how well the Xbox One is doing in the market compared to Sony's PlayStation 4. Recent numbers released by analysts this week, though, suggest that Sony continues to dominate this generation of the console wars, with the PS4 now selling twice as many units worldwide as the Xbox One since both systems launched in late 2013.

    The first set of numbers comes from a new SuperData report on the Nintendo Switch, which offhandedly mentions an installed base of 26 million Xbox One units and 55 million PS4 units. That report is backed up by Niko Partners analyst Daniel Ahmad, who recently tweeted a chart putting estimated Xbox One sales somewhere near the middle of the 25 million to 30 million range.

  • PPSSPP (PSP) Emulator 1.3.0 Version Released, Install in Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    PPSSPP is a PSP emulator written in C++, and translates PSP CPU instructions directly into optimized x86, x64 and ARM machine code, using JIT recompilers (dynarecs). PPSSPP is an open source project, licensed under the GPL. PPSSPP can run your PSP games on your PC in full HD resolution, it is cross-platform application. It can even upscale textures that would otherwise be too blurry as they were made for the small screen of the original PSP.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • OpenShot 2.2 Offers Free, Open Source Pro Editing for 4K and 5K Videos

    4K ultra HD resolution is without a doubt now at least the mainstream near future standard for digital recording, content and display resolution and we don’t expect this to change for at least a few years. The majority of new larger 50 inch+ TVs going on sale today are 4K models, 4K monitors are becoming much more common and now virtually all mid-range to premium digital recording cameras offer ultra HD resolution of at least [email protected] x 2160 pixels and in many cases even higher.

  • Google Drive CLI Client For Linux

    Google Drive is one of the most popular services to store your files in the cloud. You can access to your Google Drive account through a web browser or using a client. This time I’m going to talk about one Google Drive client but without graphical interface, in this tutorial you’re going to know how to use a client through the command line interface to access, download and upload to your google drive.

  • Calligra 3.0 Open-Source Office Suite Officially Released, Krita and Author Out

    After a long time in development, Calligra, the open-source office suite designed for KDE Plasma desktops, makes a comeback in 2017 with the release of the 3.0 milestone.

    While many GNU/Linux users were able to download and install the new Calligra 3.0 office suite from the official channels of the project or the stable software repositories of their favorite GNU/Linux distribution since last week, an official announcement was published earlier this week.

  • Free Software Foundation Makes ‘Major Overhaul’ In High Priority Projects

    Coolness alert! The Free Software Foundation has announced an updated list of high priority projects on a global scale. Top priorities now include a free software phone operating system, clouds, hardware, voice and video chat, inclusiveness, security and internationalisation of free software.

    The announcement is available here. It includes a link to the new list.

    The update followed feedback from about 150 free software community members over the past year. FSF isn’t seeking to run or control the projects, but will encourage them whether they are under their auspices or not, they said.

  • GNU Screen v.4.5.0

    I’m proud to announce the release of GNU Screen v.4.5. This time it’s mostly a bugfix release. We added just one new feature: now it’s possible to specify logfile name by using parameter -L (default name stays screenlog.0). Myself also spent some time to make source code a bit cleaner.

    As you probably noticed we were going to release 4.5 until Christmas. Unfortunately, we could not do it because of some internal GNU problems. I’m very apologise for that.

Software and today's howtos

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Software
HowTos

Leftovers: Software and Games

Filed under
Software
Gaming

Leftovers: Software and HowTos

Filed under
Software
HowTos
  • Top Software

    The number of open source applications and tools that are available on today’s popular operating systems is simply mind-blowing. They come in all forms. Small scripts and console tools that can be easily integrated into large projects, feature-rich applications that offer everything a complete solution, well designed tools, games that encourage real participation, and eye catching candy.

    Open source software holds many compelling advantages over proprietary software. Open source improves the quality of the code, keeps costs down, encourages innovation and collaboration, combined with superior security, freedom, flexibility, interoperability, business agility, and much more.

  • Kodi 17.0 "Krypton" Release Candidate 3 Updates Estuary Skin, Fixes More Bugs

    The wait is almost over, and you'll finally be able to enjoy a much modern, improved, and full of new technologies Kodi media center on your PC or HTPC device, be it an Apple TV or Raspberry Pi.

    Martijn Kaijser announced the third Release Candidate (RC) development version for the Kodi 17.0 "Krypton" media center, and it looks to us like these pre-releases are getting smaller by the day, the RC3 build including only seven changes listed on the release notes attached to the official announcement.

  • Accessing Bingo Sites through Linux
  • Fedora - linux and shell.
  • Getting started with shell scripting

GIMP Roadmap

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GNU
Software
  • GIMP's Progress In 2016, What's Ahead For 2017

    GIMP contributor Alexandre Prokoudine published a lengthy blog post today looking back at what were the accomplishments for this open-source image manipulation program in 2016 and some of what's ahead for the program this year.

    [...]

    Among the work still being done before GIMP 2.10 is released includes cleaning up libgimp, changing linear/gamma-corrected workflows, and 16/32-bit per color channel support, a new color management implementation, and more. GIMP 2.10 will hopefully ship later in 2017.

  • How To Install The Latest GIMP 2.9 Development Build on Ubuntu
  • What To Expect In GIMP 2.10

    The GIMP is our favorite image editing app for Linux, and this year it’s set to get even better. The development team behind the hugely popular open-source project this week shared word about ‘what’s next for GIMP‘ in 2017.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • 'TimeKpr' A Parental Control Application for Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Parental Control application for Linux is bit hard to find, if you encounter any then it may be outdated or just don't work as per your wish, they just restrict internet access or sort of stuff. If someone uses your computer or you let your kids use your computer. You can restrict access for them as you want, from now you don't have to say your kids to leave computer, Timekpr will do it better. You can call Timekpr restriction application or parental control application, whatever you like to call it.

  • VidCutter: A Quick And Easy Way To Trim And Merge Videos in Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    VidCutter is a free video trimming application, it is written in Python3 and PyQt5 Gui framework and it's cross-platform available for Linux and Windows, based on Qt5 and uses FFmpeg on the backend to perform quick and easy video trimming/splitting/clipping and merging/joining. VidCutter is a small program does exactly what is says, with no frills or extras. It supports most of the common video formats such as: AVI, MP4, MPEG 1/2, WMV, MP3, MOV, 3GP, FLV and so on, it exports in the same format as source file. Simply open a video file, wait for it to load and then choose the part of the video you want using the start and stop markers. The only downside currently there is no export settings available and other formats.

  • A List of Privacy Measures

    This aims to document everything I use to maintain a degree of privacy in my digital life, along with a few comments. It is targeted at intermediate Linux users who can get everything setup without any hand holding. I had wanted to write tutorials on what follows, but that would make the post unbearably long. Instead, I shall try to link to pages that are good starting points.

  • Variety 0.6.3 Rich Features Wallpaper Manager Available For Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    Variety 0.6.3 Rich Features Wallpaper Manager Available For Ubuntu/Linux Mint There are many wallpaper manager applications available which offers many features but Variety has its own way to get things done. It can display wallpapers from local sources or lots of various online sources, allows user to change wallpaper on a regular interval, and provides easy ways to separate the great images from the junk.

  • uGet 2.0.8 Download Manager Released For Ubuntu/Linux Mint Via PPA

    uGet (formerly called urlgfe) is a download manager. uGet is a very Powerful & Lightweight download manager application with a large inventory of features. uGet is an Open Source download manager application for GNU/Linux developed with GTK+. It allows you to classify download, and allows you to import download from HTML files. Every category has an independent configuration that can be inherited by each download in that category. uGet uses very few resources while at the same time packs an unparalleled powerful feature set. These features include a Queue, Pause/Resume, Multi-Connection (with adaptive segment management), Mirrors (multi-source), Multi-Protocol, Advanced Categorization, Clipboard Monitor, Batch Downloads, Individualized Category Default Settings, Speed Limiting, Total Active Downloads Control, and so much more!

  • Telegram Desktop reaches version 1.0 – and it's BEAUTIFUL

    Telegram was available for desktops and laptops since 2013. Today it finally graduates to version 1.0 with a fabulous new design.

    Consistent material design, great animations, and support for custom themes make Telegram for Windows, Mac, and Linux the tool for messaging from your Mac or PC.

  • A look at darktable 2.2.0

    In what is becoming its annual tradition, the darktable project released a new stable version of its image-editing system at the end of December. The new 2.2 release incorporates several new photo-correction features of note, including automatic repair of distorted perspectives and the ability to reconstruct highlights that are washed out in some color channels but not all—a type of overexposure that other editors can miss. There is a new image-warping tool that lets users edit image pixels (a first for darktable, which has historically focused on image-wide tasks like color correction). And there is at least one new tool that may prove intriguing even to users who prefer editing images in some other program: a utility for inspecting and editing color-mapping look-up tables.

    Source code bundles are available for download through the project's GitHub repository and binary packages are already available for a wide variety of popular Linux distributions. Users of the 2.0 series should note, however, that opening existing darktable edit files with the 2.2 release will automatically migrate them to the newer format and render them subsequently unopenable with darktable 2.0.

  • Moving on from net-tools

    Old habits die hard, even when support for the tools required by those habits ended over a decade ago. It is not surprising for users to cling to the tools they learned early in their careers, even when they are told that it is time to move on. A recent discussion on the Debian development list showed the sort of stress that this kind of inertia can put on a distribution and explored the options that distributors have to try to nudge their users toward more supportable solutions.

    The package in question is net-tools, the home for many familiar network-configuration utilities. If you are accustomed to using commands like ifconfig, arp, netstat, or route to make network changes, you are a net-tools user. Many of these tools have a long pedigree, at least in spirit, having originally been written before the first Linux kernel. Anybody who has been administering Unix-like systems for any period of time will certainly have learned how to use the net-tools utilities to get things done.

Ashley Williams on npm

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Software
  • State of the Union: npm

    Ashley Williams kicked off her colorful "paint by number" keynote at Node.js Interactive by explaining that npm is actually a for-profit company. Npm makes money by selling its enterprise services and, apart from the amounts required to run the everyday operations of a regular company, its revenue is invested in running the npm registry.

  • KEYNOTE: State of the Union: npm by Ashley Williams, npm

    In this keynote, Ashley Williams, Developer Community and Content Manager, discusses how npm works as a service and shares some of the remarkable numbers associated with the registry.

Leftovers: Software

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Software
  • VidCutter is an Open-Source Video Trimmer app

    I’m pretty capture happy with my Nexus 5X because a) the camera is decent and Cool live with 6 very comical cats…

    Sometimes I take videos but only want to use a specific part of it, be it to turn into an animated gif or quickly share it with folks online.

    This is where video trimming apps come in handy.

  • The elusive Palm OS 5.5 Garnet emulator for Windows/Linux

    From top left to bottom right, you're looking at Palm OS 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 5.3 (a Palm Zire ROM), 5.4.9 (the last released version of Palm OS available on real devices), and Palm OS 6.1.0 Cobalt (the last version of Palm OS; no 6.x device has ever been released). This is a pretty complete collection, and while it doesn't contain every released version of Palm OS, it covers the most important ones, and provides a great overview of the development of the operating system.

  • Opera Won’t Be Bringing New Browser ‘Neon’ to Linux

    Opera Software debuted an all-new concept browser called Opera Neon yesterday.

    Neon is fast, blingy, and a little bit gimmicky, but does some neat new stuff that has gotten a lot of people quite excited.

    Sadly, Neon wasn’t made available to download on Linux.

    And now we find out that it won’t be.

  • Skype for Linux Alpha 1.15 released with support for autostart and more
  • Rogue Wave Software's TotalView for HPC and CodeDynamics

    New versions of not just one but two dynamic analysis tools from Rogue Wave Software were unveiled recently to pleased developers everywhere. Upgraded TotalView for HPC and CodeDynamics, versions 2016.07, improve the diagnosis and correction of bugs, memory issues and crashes at execution.

Wine 2.0 RC5

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Software
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More in Tux Machines

Games and CrossOver

Red Hat and Fedora

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • CoreOS Tectonic Now Installs Kubernetes on OpenStack
    CoreOS and OpenStack have a somewhat intertwined history, which is why it's somewhat surprising it took until today for CoreOS's Tectonic Kubernetes distribution to provide an installer that targets OpenStack cloud deployments.
  • Docker and Core OS plan to donate their container technologies to CNCF
    Containers have become a critical component of modern cloud, and Docker Inc. controls the heart of containers, the container runtime. There has been a growing demand that this critical piece of technology should be under control of a neutral, third party so that the community can invest in it freely.
  • How Blockchain Is Helping China Go Greener
    Blockchain has near-universal applicability as a distributed transaction platform for securely authenticating exchanges of data, goods, and services. IBM and the Beijing-based Energy-Blockchain Labs are even using it to help reduce carbon emissions in air-polluted China.
  • An efficient approach to continuous documentation
  • The peril in counting source lines on an OSS project
    There seems to be a phase that OSS projects go through where as they mature and gain traction. As they do it becomes increasingly important for vendors to point to their contributions to credibly say they are the ‘xyz’ company. Heptio is one such vendor operating in the OSS space, and this isn’t lost on us. :) It helps during a sales cycle to be able to say “we are the a big contributor to this project, look at the percentage of code and PRs we submitted”. While transparency is important as is recognizing the contributions that key vendors, focus on a single metric in isolation (and LoC in particular) creates a perverse incentive structure. Taken to its extreme it becomes detrimental to project health.
  • An Open Source Unicycle Motor
    And something to ponder. The company that sells this electric unicycle could choose to use a motor with open firmware or one with closed firmware. To many consumers, that difference might not be so significant. To this consumer, though, that’s a vital difference. To me, I fully own the product I bought when the firmware is open. I explain to others that they ought to choose that level of full ownership whenever they get a chance. And if they join a local makerspace, they will likely meet others with similar values. If you don’t yet have a makerspace in your community, inquire around to see if anyone is in the process of forming one. Then find ways to offer them support. That’s how we do things in the FOSS community.
  • The A/V guy’s take on PyCon Pune
    “This is crazy!”, that was my reaction at some point in PyCon Pune. This is one of my first conference where I participated in a lot of things starting from the website to audio/video and of course being the speaker. I saw a lot of aspects of how a conference works and where what can go wrong. I met some amazing people, people who impacted my life , people who I will never forget. I received so much of love and affection that I can never express in words. So before writing anything else I want to thank each and everyone of you , “Thank you!”.
  • Azure Service Fabric takes first tentative steps toward open source [Ed: Microsoft Peter is openwashing a patent trap with back doors]
  • Simulate the Internet with Flashback, a New WebDev Test Tool from LinkedIn
  • Mashape Raises $18M for API Gateway Tech
    Casado sees Mashape's Kong API gateway in particular as being a particularly well positioned technology. Kong is an open-source API gateway and microservice management technology.
  • PrismTech to Demonstrate Open Source FACE 2.1 Transport Services Segment (TSS) Reference Implementation at Air Force FACE Technical Interchange Meeting
    PrismTech’s TSS reference implementation is being made available under GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) v3 open source license terms.
  • How Open-Source Robotics Hardware Is Accelerating Research and Innovation

    The latest issue of the IEEE Robotics & Automation Magazine features a special report on open-source robotics hardware and its impact in the field.