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Software

Software: Atom-IDE, MPV 0.27, and Sublime Text 3

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  • Introducing Atom-IDE

    GitHub, in collaboration with Facebook, are pleased to announce the launch of Atom-IDE - a set of optional packages to bring IDE-like functionality to Atom.

    The start of this journey includes smarter context-aware auto-completion as well as a host of code navigation features such as an outline view, go to definition, find all references as well as other useful functions such as hover-to-reveal information, errors and warnings (diagnostics) and document formatting.

    Our initial release includes packages for TypeScript, Flow, JavaScript, Java, C# and PHP that utilize the power of language servers to provide deep syntactical analysis of your code and projects. The language server protocol is being adopted by a number of organizations including Microsoft, Eclipse, Sourcegraph, Palantir, Red Hat, Facebook and now GitHub too!

  • Github Announce Atom IDE

    Github has announced Atom IDE, an add-on that transforms the Atom text editor into a full IDE using language servers to provide syntactical analysis of code.

  • MPV 0.27 Released with Minor Fixes, New OpenGL Options

    An updated version of MPV, the popular open-source media player, is available to download.

  • Sublime Text 3 Officially Released, Here’s How To Install It

    Sublime Text 3 has been officially released! I know; it feels like you’ve been using the beta builds for what feels like an eternity — but, at long last, a new stable release of the text editor is now available to download.

Software and howtos: QOwnNotes, MPV Player 0.27, Qt 5.10 Alpha and More

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HowTos

Blender 2.79 Released

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  • Blender 2.79 Released

    These are the release notes for Blender 2.79, released September 12th, 2017.

  • Blender 2.79 Now Available With Much Faster Radeon OpenCL

    Today marks the long-awaited debut of the Blender 2.79 3D modeling software release. Especially for those using OpenCL acceleration, Blender 2.79 is quite an exciting update.

    Exciting us the most about Blender 2.79 is better OpenCL support and much greater performance. The performance improvements in Blender 2.79 aren't limited to OpenCL (or CUDA) but include greater performance on the CPU too thanks to continued AVX optimizations as well as continued multi-threading work. On the CPU side there can be 10~20% speed-ups while for some situations on OpenCL are now as much as 50% faster.

Software and howtos: Torrench, Gradio, Watermarking Images and More

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HowTos

Software: KGraphViewer 2.4.0, Harmony, Inkscape, GCC

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  • KGraphViewer 2.4.0

    KGraphViewer 2.4.0 has been released.

    KGraphViewer is a visualiser for Graphviz’s DOT format of graphs.
    https://www.kde.org/applications/graphics/kgraphviewer

    This ports KGraphViewer to use KDE Frameworks 5 and Qt 5.

  • KGraphViewer Brought To KDE Frameworks 5, Qt 5

    For those relying upon KGraphViewer as a Graphviz dot graph viewer, it's the latest package ported to Qt5 and KDE Frameworks 5.

  • Harmony: A Player That Can Play Audio Locally And From Cloud Services

    Harmony is audio player inspired from iTunes, it is built with Electron and vanilla JS, available for Linux, Windows and Mac. It plays audio files locally and from cloud services as well. It is based on plugins, and plugins are available for Spotify, SoundCloud, Google Play Music, Hype Machine, Deezer, and local files.
    It is skinable means you can write and install themes but it has two themes available other than default. Harmony can be controlled using keyboard shortcuts and media keys. Press ? to see the list of available shortcuts. It is responsive design player that means you can resize it however you want, make it compact or half screen or full screen, it will follow you. It uses the tray or the sound menu integration to control the playback even when the app isn't focused.

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  • Draw Freely Vector Graphics Using Professional Inkscape

    Inkscape is a free and open-source professional vector graphics application, it is cross-platform available for GNU/Linux, Windows and Mac. You can use Inkscape if you are either professional or hobbyist designer, using this software you can create wide variety of graphics such as illustrations, icons, logos, diagrams, maps and web graphics. Inkscape uses the W3C open standard SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) as its native format.

  • GCC 8 Might Pursue Better, More Modern Default Options

    Motivated by the 2017 GNU Tools Cauldron, an ARM developer is looking for feedback on improving the options enabled by default for the GCC 8 compiler.

    Wilco Dijkstra of ARM is looking to possibly loosen GCC's conservative defaults a bit by allowing some more modern options by default and possibly adding more optimizations to -O2 too.

KStars 2.8.3 Released and a Look at Pithos

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  • KStars 2.8.3 aka Tommy is out!

    The bugfix release of KStars 2.8.3 is available for all major platforms. In this version, we finally managed to release translations for Windows & MacOS users, thanks to the efforts of Hannah and Kevin over at Craft, and the KDE translation team.

  • Pithos, the Linux Pandora Radio App, Adds 10-Band Equalizer + More!

    A new version of Pithos, the open-source Pandora Radio client for Linux desktops, is available to download. Pithos 1.4.0 introduces a number of new plugins that extend its feature set, including a 10-band equalizer, a screensaver/lock screen inhibiter, and a volume normalizer.

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Software: VLC, OpenShot, OBS Studio, Caffeine

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  • VLC Has Begun Working On Some 3D Video Playback Support

    It's been a while since last having anything to report on with VLC with the VLC 3.0 release still not available, but thanks to this year's Google Summer of Code, there was an interesting project around working on 3D format support.

    Mohammed Huzaifa is the student developer who spent the summer working on 3D support for libVLC.

  • OpenShot 2.4 Open-Source Video Editor Adds New Freeze & Zoom Presets, Many Fixes

    Jonathan Thomas, the creator of the open-source and cross-platform OpenShot video editor, announced OpenShot 2.4, a major release that adds new freeze and freeze & zoom presets, improves stability, as well as undo/redo history.

    First and foremost, OpenShot 2.4 wants to be a stability release that fixes a bunch of bugs and issues reported by users since previous versions of the applications. Most importantly, it addresses a nasty issue that was apparently the leading cause of numerous crashes. Therefore, it is recommended that all users update to OpenShot 2.4 or later as soon as possible.

  • OBS Studio – Record and Live Stream Videos from Linux Desktop

    OBS Studio is a free and open source cross-platform app with which you can create video records of your desktop screen and also live stream directly.

    You can use it to conveniently share your gaming, art, entertainment activities with Twitch.tv, YouTube, Hitbox.tv, DailyMotion, Connectcast.tv, CyberGame.tv, CashPlay.tv along with custom streaming servers free of charge!

  • CobiBird Theme Updated And Available For 17.04 Zesty/16.04 Xenial/Linux Mint 18
  • Caffeine Can Help You Disable Screenlock And Screensaver Temporarily

    Caffeine is pretty famous utility designed for Linux to disable screen-lock and screensaver temporarily so you can focus on what you are doing on your system. It stays in the panel and fairly straightforward application. It can be useful either you are working or listening or watching something that players don't prevent computer from going into sleep mode or prevent screensaver.

    Without caffeine you need to go to power management in the system settings then disable sleep and also screensaver, Caffeine solves this issue and it comes in handy as well because you can activate/deactivate it right from system tray just with a single click.

Software and Games: Kolab, Green Recorder, ownCloud, Geary and Molecats

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  • Kolab Now Really Beta (DevOps Edition)

    This is a work in progress. It means that many of the additional functionality that Kolab has brought to Roundcube needs adapting to become responsive [^2]. I will certainly work to make beta.kolabnow.com appear more “kolab” — a logo or two, some colour scheme, you know the drill.

  • Green Recorder – A Simple Screen Recorder For Linux With Wayland Support

    Green recorder is a free, open source, simple desktop recorder for Linux systems and written using Python, GTK+3 and ffmpeg. It supports audio and video recording on most of the Linux desktop environments such as Unity, Gnome, Cinnamon, Mate, Xfce, etc.,. It is the first application that supports Wayland display server on GNOME session.

    Currently it supports mkv, avi, mp4, wmv, gif and nut (And only WebM for Wayland’s GNOME session). You can simple start & stop the recording by clicking the appropriate button in main menu. A play button has been added in the main menu which allows user to playback of a recorded video.

  • Latest OwnCloud Is A Major Release So Far, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    ownCloud is a cloud hosting solution which can be deployed at home and using it locally or access it from anywhere. It functions similar to Dropbox/Google Drive and so on but with more functionality. It is open-source, free to use that means anyone can create a private server at home/office or for business. ownCloud also support online services like Google Drive, with online document editing, calendar and contact synchronization, and more.

  • Geary Is An Amazing Email Client For Linux

    Geary is a free and open-source desktop email application, developed for Linux users written vala language and released under GNU LGPL-v2.1 license. It is simple and straightforward to setup and has modern user interface. It shows email messages as conversations which lets you read a complete discussion without having to find and click from message to message.
    It supports almost every major email provider such as Yahoo, Gmail, Outlook and so on, as well as other email services either your own or by some company using IMAP configuration. It notifies you for the new email using desktop notifications so you will never miss an email. It's interface easy and straightforward and email setup is fairly simple. Further more it lets you search and organize your emails easily.

  • Molecats, a Lemmings-like puzzle game where you adjust the environment to progress

Software: Cockpit 150, Komorebi 2, FFmpeg and Chromium

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  • Cockpit 150

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from versions 149 and 150.

  • Your Desktop Wallpaper Just Got Interesting Again

    Komorebi 2 claims to be “faster, smoother, and better” than before. There are new features, a new codebase and (naturally) new wallpapers.

  • FFmpeg's VP9 Decoder Is Much Faster Thanks To GSoC 2017

    As we previously reported on, there was a Google Summer of Code project this year optimizing FFmpeg's VP9 decoder particularly around AVX2 instructions and threading. The project was a success and VP9 decoding should be much faster with FFmpeg as a result.

    GSoC '17 student developer Ilia Valiakhmetov spent his time optimizing the FFmpeg VP9 code for AVX (Advanced Vector Extensions) as well as implementing tile threading support. His AVX2 optimizations are already in FFmpeg Git while his tile threading code is still being reviewed.

  • Chromium Now Supports GPU Sandboxing With Radeon Graphics On Linux

    Chrome/Chromium supports GPU sandboxing for security purposes and now it will work fine with the AMD graphics on Linux.

    As explained in this Git commit that was just merged minutes ago, "Default sandboxing fails for AMD platform as the GPU process spawns multiple threads. So GPU sandboxing needs to be started early. And all dependent libraries need to be preloaded."

Software: PulseAudio, PiCluster, Wikit, massif-visualizer, Kdenlive, OpenShot, Elisa, and GNOME

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Software
  • News: New release of PulseAudio.
  • PiCluster – A Simple, Web-based Docker Management Application

    PiCluster is a simple, open source, web-based docker management application used to manage Docker containers across multiple hosts. Unlike Docker Swarm or Kubernetes, PiCluster is easy to setup and use. The latest PiCluster version has brought new features. It makes the process of creating containers much easier than ever. Say for example, the users can now upload a zip of their Dockerfile’s to the PiCluster web console and the files will be copied to every node and extracted in the Docker directory specified in PiCluster config file. Also, when a container is added, the image will be automatically built and run in a single step. In previous releases, users would have to manually create the container. It will work on both 32-bit and 64-bit platforms.

  • Wikit – Get Wikipedia Summaries From Commandline In Linux

    Wikipedia has several millions of articles and the number of articles are steadily increasing every single day. It is the first place that comes to my mind when I’m looking for knowledge. Today, I have stumbled upon a simple, yet useful command-line utility called “Wikit”. It displays the summary of any Wikipedia article in Terminal. As we all know already, the Wikipedia has the largest and most comprehensive articles. If you don’t want to waste time to read a comprehensive Wikipedia article, you can then use Wikit to get Wikipedia summaries from commandline. To be precise, Wikit will display the first few paragraphs (the summary, of course) before the table of contents of a Wikipedia article.

  • massif-visualizer 0.7.0 released

    Massif Visualizer is a visualiser for output generated by Valgrind’s massif tool. It shows you graphs which measure how much heap memory your program uses.

  • Kdenlive 17.08.1 released

    Although the team is at full throttle getting ready for the 17.12 big refactoring release, we make available the first point release of the 17.08 series bringing various bugfixes and usability improvements. Stay tuned for testing the refactoring branch packages to be announced soon.

  • OpenShot 2.4 Released, Focuses on Stability

    A new version of OpenShot, the crash-happy open-source non-linear video editor, is available to download. While the previous couple of releases were big on features the latest release is a “stability-focused release”, says project lead Jonathan Thomas.

  • OpenShot 2.4.0 Released | Improved Stability & More!

    The latest and greatest version of OpenShot Video Editor (version 2.4.0) has been officially released, and I'm proud to bring you all the details! This is a stability-focused release, and much of the effort was "behind-the-scenes" type work.

  • OpenShot 2.4 Brings Better Stability To This Open-Source Video Editor

    Jon Thomas has announced the release of the OpenShot Video Editor 2.4 released. Among the features of OpenShot 2.4 are "vastly improved stability" for this non-linear, cross-platform video editor.

  • Essential Tools for Producing High Quality Podcasts on Linux

    Podcasts are a booming business, and many audio pros are seeing more and more work dedicated to this platform. Mac and Windows users have plenty of options for professionally recording and mastering audio, but Linux users aren’t quite as lucky. Yet if you really love the penguin, there are still awesome podcast tools for producing high-quality podcasts on Linux.

  • Twitter Finally Rolls Out Night Mode Feature to Linux, Windows and Mac Users

    The long-anticipated Night Mode feature is ready to conquer your desktop, help stop eye strain, and help you fall asleep after a long night of twittering. The feature is currently rolling out to the desktop version of twitter.com and should be supported on all modern web browsers, including Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, and Opera.

  • Elisa, Accessibility and other News

    I should be communicating more often about development related to the Elisa music player. Recently Safa Alfulaij added support for right-to-left interface. This is a very good excuse to talk about what happened since my previous post.

  • GNOME 3.26rc2 (2.25.92) RELEASED
  • GNOME 3.26 RC2 Released: The Final Step For This Big GNOME Update

    GNOME 3.25.92 is available today, marking the last development release before the official GNOME 3.26 debut.

  • EA's Frostbite Engine Has Been Internally Up And Running On Linux

    While not for public consumption at least for now, the Electronic Arts' Frostbite game engine has seen internal Linux testing/development.

    EA developer Johan Andersson was comparing the size of the Linux kernel source tree to that of their Frostbite game engine: there are more files, lines, comments, and code in Frostbite than in the Linux kernel. Johan has been a technical fellow and director at EA since 2000.

  • Shuffle the Decks with These Ace Open Source Card Games

    A card game is a game that uses playing cards as the main way the game is played. The cards can be a standard deck of 52 French playing cards with 4 suits of Spades, Hearts, Diamonds, and Clubs. Or the cards can be game-specific. There is a plethora of card games available, with families of related games.

    Card games offer many positive attributes. They can improve mental skills, memory and logic. They can test your patience, help you focus, and are popular for all ages. Having a good memory is essential to a person’s overall well-being. A good way to improve memory is playing fun games. Whether it’s a board game or a deck of cards, putting your brain to work definitely has its advantages. The earlier a person who has a poor working memory can begin to strengthen it, the more successful they’ll be in life.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

Linux Kernel Space: eBPF and More (LWN Paywall Expired)

  • A thorough introduction to eBPF
    In his linux.conf.au 2017 talk [YouTube] on the eBPF in-kernel virtual machine, Brendan Gregg proclaimed that "super powers have finally come to Linux". Getting eBPF to that point has been a long road of evolution and design. While eBPF was originally used for network packet filtering, it turns out that running user-space code inside a sanity-checking virtual machine is a powerful tool for kernel developers and production engineers. Over time, new eBPF users have appeared to take advantage of its performance and convenience. This article explains how eBPF evolved how it works, and how it is used in the kernel.
  • Restricting automatic kernel-module loading
    The kernel's module mechanism allows the building of a kernel with a wide range of hardware and software support without requiring that all of that code actually be loaded into any given running system. The availability of all of those modules in a typical distributor kernel means that a lot of features are available — but also, potentially, a lot of exploitable bugs. There have been numerous cases where the kernel's automatic module loader has been used to bring buggy code into a running system. An attempt to reduce the kernel's exposure to buggy modules shows how difficult some kinds of hardening work can be.
  • Container IDs for the audit subsystem
    Linux containers are something of an amorphous beast, at least with respect to the kernel. There are lots of facilities that the kernel provides (namespaces, control groups, seccomp, and so on) that can be composed by user-space tools into containers of various shapes and colors; the kernel is blissfully unaware of how user space views that composition. But there is interest in having the kernel be more aware of containers and for it to be able to distinguish what user space considers to be a single container. One particular use case for the kernel managing container identifiers is the audit subsystem, which needs unforgeable IDs for containers that can be associated with audit trails. Back in early October, Richard Guy Briggs posted the second version of his RFC for kernel container IDs that can be used by the audit subsystem. The first version was posted in mid-September, but is not the only proposal out there. David Howells proposed turning containers into full-fledged kernel objects back in May, but seemingly ran aground on objections that the proposal "muddies the waters and makes things more brittle", in the words of namespaces maintainer Eric W. Biederman.

today's howtos

Graphics: Texture Compression, Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL), and AMD FreeSync

  • Unity Continues Crunching More Out Of Crunch Texture Compression
    Unity is one of the big public users of the open-source Crunch DXT texture compression library. While it's no longer maintained by Rich Geldreich / Binomial, Unity has continued advancing this open-source code to further improve the compression ratio and speed. For months Unity has been talking about their promising findings with Crunch. But this is the project that Rich Geldreich, the former Valve developer, previously expressed regret having open-sourced all of it. While he is on to working on better and more advanced technologies at his Binomial startup, Unity is working to squeeze more out of this open-source library.
  • Improving EFL Graphics With Wayland Application Redraws
    Under X, application redraws are tricky to do without tearing because content can be updated at any chosen time with no clear feedback as to when the compositor will read it. EFL uses some clever tricks to this end (check out the state of the art X redraw timing for yourself), but it’s difficult to get right in all cases. For a lot of people this just works, or they’re not sensitive to the issue when it doesn’t.
  • Improved Wayland Application Redraws Coming To Enlightenment's EFL
    Samsung's Open-Source Group has been working on making their Wayland support in the Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL) even better. The latest Wayland work on the Enlightenment/EFL front has been improving the application redraw process. The EFL toolkit with the upcoming v1.21 release will now be hooking into Wayland's frame callbacks to better dealing with drawing, only drawing when necessary, and doing so without the possibility of tearing.
  • AMD FreeSync For Tear-Free Linux Gaming - Current State In 2017
    If you are thinking of gifting yourself (or someone else) a FreeSync-compatible monitor this holiday season, here's a look at how the AMD FreeSync support is working right now, the driver bits you need to be aware of, and how it's all playing out for those wanting to use this tear-free capability for Linux gaming.