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Software

Software: OpenStack Charms 17.08, PiCluster 2.2 and More

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  • OpenStack Charms 17.08 release!

    The OpenStack Charms team is pleased to announce that the 17.08 release of the OpenStack Charms is now available from jujucharms.com!

    In addition to 204 bug fixes across the charms and support for OpenStack Pike, this release includes a new charm for Gnocchi, support for Neutron internal DNS, Percona Cluster performance tuning and much more.

  • Go Serverless with new PiCluster 2.2

    I am pleased to introduce the new release of PiCluster! In PiCluster 2.2, there is now support to deploy functions! With this new feature, applications can spin up containers themselves and retrieve data from the PiCluster server. Let’s explore how this works.

    When a function is finished running, the container is automatically deleted and the output is stored on the server. When the application requests the data from the server, the data is removed as well.

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  • Plasma publictransport rewrite – Part II

    Last time we heard the publictransport applet was being re-written was almost a year back now. Since then, it has indeed gone through some sorts of rewrite, but at the Randa meetings, 2017, this has taken a whole new course.

  • Spam filtering with Rspamd

    Running one's own mail system on the Internet has become an increasingly difficult thing to do, to the point that many people don't bother, even if they have the necessary skills. Among the challenges is spam; without effective spam filtering, an email account will quickly drown under a deluge of vile offers, phishing attempts, malware, and alternative facts. Many of us turn to SpamAssassin for this task, but it's not the only alternative; Rspamd is increasingly worth considering in this role. Your editor gave Rspamd a spin to get a sense for whether switching would be a good thing to do.

    SpamAssassin is a highly effective tool; its developers could be forgiven for thinking that they have solved the spam problem and can move on. Which is good, because they would appear to have concluded exactly that. The "latest news" on the project's page reveals that the last release was 3.4.1, which came out in April 2015. Stability in a core communications tool is good but, still, it is worth asking whether there is really nothing more to be done in the area of spam filtering.

  • Finding driver bugs with DR. CHECKER

    Drivers are a consistent source of kernel bugs, at least partly due to less review, but also because drivers are typically harder for tools to analyze. A team from the University of California, Santa Barbara has set out to change that with a static-analysis tool called DR. CHECKER. In a paper [PDF] presented at the recent 26th USENIX Security Symposium, the team introduced the tool and the results of running it on nine production Linux kernels. Those results were rather encouraging: "it correctly identified 158 critical zero-day bugs with an overall precision of 78%".

Wine 2.17

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Software: Sublime Text, Synfig Studio, Temps, and PiCluster 2.2

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Software
  • Sublime Text 3.0 Released With New Features — Download Here For Linux, Windows, Mac

    Sublime Text is one of best text editors around, there’s no doubt about that. Making this tool even better, its developers have just pushed the latest and much-awaited Sublime Text 3.0 release with new features.

  • Synfig Studio: A Powerful Open Source Animation Software

    There are some animation applications available but Synfig made its way trough crowd-funding and it's been successful. It is powerful, free, open-source vector-based 2D animation software package, developed from the scratch for producing feature-film quality 2D animation with fewer resources and people, it is released under the GNU General Public License.
    Synfig stores its animations in its own XML file format, often compressed with gzip. These files use the filename extension .sif (uncompressed), .sifz (compressed) or .sfg (zip container format). The files store vector graphics data, embed or reference external bitmap images, and also a revision history of the project. It can render to video formats such as AVI, Theora and MPEG, as well as animated graphics formats such as MNG and GIF. It can also render to a sequence of numbered image files, using formats such as PNG, BMP, PPM and OpenEXR.

  • Temps: A Beautiful Weather Application For Your Desktop

    Temps is a simple, free and open-source smart weather application, designed to stay on the desktop as a widget. It is cross-platform available for Linux, Windows and Mac. It is built using Electron, Menubar, Chart.js, and OpenWeatherMap technologies.

    It does work with most of the desktops and lets you touch it visually. Basically it stays on the desktop as a widget and display current weather in any location around the world. It displays forecast for the following four days with current day.

    Since this is a non-profit project, developer is not able to offer unlimited access to weather information that means you can signup to OpenWeatherMap API and create a free key for yourself.

  • Functions-as-a-Service coming to PiCluster 2.2

    Check out the Wiki page for code samples and an overview of how it works. To try it out now before 2.2 is released, check out the dev branch on GitHub. Regarding the release status, functions are stable now but we are waiting for possible changes to the other components of PiCluster.

Software: Atom-IDE, MPV 0.27, and Sublime Text 3

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  • Introducing Atom-IDE

    GitHub, in collaboration with Facebook, are pleased to announce the launch of Atom-IDE - a set of optional packages to bring IDE-like functionality to Atom.

    The start of this journey includes smarter context-aware auto-completion as well as a host of code navigation features such as an outline view, go to definition, find all references as well as other useful functions such as hover-to-reveal information, errors and warnings (diagnostics) and document formatting.

    Our initial release includes packages for TypeScript, Flow, JavaScript, Java, C# and PHP that utilize the power of language servers to provide deep syntactical analysis of your code and projects. The language server protocol is being adopted by a number of organizations including Microsoft, Eclipse, Sourcegraph, Palantir, Red Hat, Facebook and now GitHub too!

  • Github Announce Atom IDE

    Github has announced Atom IDE, an add-on that transforms the Atom text editor into a full IDE using language servers to provide syntactical analysis of code.

  • MPV 0.27 Released with Minor Fixes, New OpenGL Options

    An updated version of MPV, the popular open-source media player, is available to download.

  • Sublime Text 3 Officially Released, Here’s How To Install It

    Sublime Text 3 has been officially released! I know; it feels like you’ve been using the beta builds for what feels like an eternity — but, at long last, a new stable release of the text editor is now available to download.

Software and howtos: QOwnNotes, MPV Player 0.27, Qt 5.10 Alpha and More

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HowTos

Blender 2.79 Released

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  • Blender 2.79 Released

    These are the release notes for Blender 2.79, released September 12th, 2017.

  • Blender 2.79 Now Available With Much Faster Radeon OpenCL

    Today marks the long-awaited debut of the Blender 2.79 3D modeling software release. Especially for those using OpenCL acceleration, Blender 2.79 is quite an exciting update.

    Exciting us the most about Blender 2.79 is better OpenCL support and much greater performance. The performance improvements in Blender 2.79 aren't limited to OpenCL (or CUDA) but include greater performance on the CPU too thanks to continued AVX optimizations as well as continued multi-threading work. On the CPU side there can be 10~20% speed-ups while for some situations on OpenCL are now as much as 50% faster.

Software and howtos: Torrench, Gradio, Watermarking Images and More

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HowTos

Software: KGraphViewer 2.4.0, Harmony, Inkscape, GCC

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  • KGraphViewer 2.4.0

    KGraphViewer 2.4.0 has been released.

    KGraphViewer is a visualiser for Graphviz’s DOT format of graphs.
    https://www.kde.org/applications/graphics/kgraphviewer

    This ports KGraphViewer to use KDE Frameworks 5 and Qt 5.

  • KGraphViewer Brought To KDE Frameworks 5, Qt 5

    For those relying upon KGraphViewer as a Graphviz dot graph viewer, it's the latest package ported to Qt5 and KDE Frameworks 5.

  • Harmony: A Player That Can Play Audio Locally And From Cloud Services

    Harmony is audio player inspired from iTunes, it is built with Electron and vanilla JS, available for Linux, Windows and Mac. It plays audio files locally and from cloud services as well. It is based on plugins, and plugins are available for Spotify, SoundCloud, Google Play Music, Hype Machine, Deezer, and local files.
    It is skinable means you can write and install themes but it has two themes available other than default. Harmony can be controlled using keyboard shortcuts and media keys. Press ? to see the list of available shortcuts. It is responsive design player that means you can resize it however you want, make it compact or half screen or full screen, it will follow you. It uses the tray or the sound menu integration to control the playback even when the app isn't focused.

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  • Draw Freely Vector Graphics Using Professional Inkscape

    Inkscape is a free and open-source professional vector graphics application, it is cross-platform available for GNU/Linux, Windows and Mac. You can use Inkscape if you are either professional or hobbyist designer, using this software you can create wide variety of graphics such as illustrations, icons, logos, diagrams, maps and web graphics. Inkscape uses the W3C open standard SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) as its native format.

  • GCC 8 Might Pursue Better, More Modern Default Options

    Motivated by the 2017 GNU Tools Cauldron, an ARM developer is looking for feedback on improving the options enabled by default for the GCC 8 compiler.

    Wilco Dijkstra of ARM is looking to possibly loosen GCC's conservative defaults a bit by allowing some more modern options by default and possibly adding more optimizations to -O2 too.

KStars 2.8.3 Released and a Look at Pithos

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Software
  • KStars 2.8.3 aka Tommy is out!

    The bugfix release of KStars 2.8.3 is available for all major platforms. In this version, we finally managed to release translations for Windows & MacOS users, thanks to the efforts of Hannah and Kevin over at Craft, and the KDE translation team.

  • Pithos, the Linux Pandora Radio App, Adds 10-Band Equalizer + More!

    A new version of Pithos, the open-source Pandora Radio client for Linux desktops, is available to download. Pithos 1.4.0 introduces a number of new plugins that extend its feature set, including a 10-band equalizer, a screensaver/lock screen inhibiter, and a volume normalizer.

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Software: VLC, OpenShot, OBS Studio, Caffeine

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Software
  • VLC Has Begun Working On Some 3D Video Playback Support

    It's been a while since last having anything to report on with VLC with the VLC 3.0 release still not available, but thanks to this year's Google Summer of Code, there was an interesting project around working on 3D format support.

    Mohammed Huzaifa is the student developer who spent the summer working on 3D support for libVLC.

  • OpenShot 2.4 Open-Source Video Editor Adds New Freeze & Zoom Presets, Many Fixes

    Jonathan Thomas, the creator of the open-source and cross-platform OpenShot video editor, announced OpenShot 2.4, a major release that adds new freeze and freeze & zoom presets, improves stability, as well as undo/redo history.

    First and foremost, OpenShot 2.4 wants to be a stability release that fixes a bunch of bugs and issues reported by users since previous versions of the applications. Most importantly, it addresses a nasty issue that was apparently the leading cause of numerous crashes. Therefore, it is recommended that all users update to OpenShot 2.4 or later as soon as possible.

  • OBS Studio – Record and Live Stream Videos from Linux Desktop

    OBS Studio is a free and open source cross-platform app with which you can create video records of your desktop screen and also live stream directly.

    You can use it to conveniently share your gaming, art, entertainment activities with Twitch.tv, YouTube, Hitbox.tv, DailyMotion, Connectcast.tv, CyberGame.tv, CashPlay.tv along with custom streaming servers free of charge!

  • CobiBird Theme Updated And Available For 17.04 Zesty/16.04 Xenial/Linux Mint 18
  • Caffeine Can Help You Disable Screenlock And Screensaver Temporarily

    Caffeine is pretty famous utility designed for Linux to disable screen-lock and screensaver temporarily so you can focus on what you are doing on your system. It stays in the panel and fairly straightforward application. It can be useful either you are working or listening or watching something that players don't prevent computer from going into sleep mode or prevent screensaver.

    Without caffeine you need to go to power management in the system settings then disable sleep and also screensaver, Caffeine solves this issue and it comes in handy as well because you can activate/deactivate it right from system tray just with a single click.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.