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9 Essential Linux Classroom Tools

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Educators face a constant variety of challenges that can impact classroom management and the learning process. An inattentive audience, mobile phone texting, disruption by unruly students, absenteeism, time constraints, students forced to take a course they would rather have avoided, and regular changes to the curriculum are just a few examples of the difficulties faced by teachers. Fortunately, there are many different ways for those involved in education, whether in teaching, training, or leadership, to help to improve student’s learning in the classroom, and overcome the obstacles that are encountered.

Information and communications technology (ICT) plays an important role in the planning, delivery, assessment and recording of classroom lessons. The software featured in this software offers indispensable ways to help manage a computer-based classroom, and provide the freedom to offer an exciting, creative, and challenging environment.

With this software, educators can create, administer, and grade tests, help manage a computer-based classroom, create an interactive whiteboard, and produce modular courses. All of the software featured in this article is released under a freely distributable license and can be downloaded without charge. With even tighter constraints facing the public sector, cost is an important consideration for any ICT solution.

To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of 9 of the finest classroom tools covering a wide variety of different ways to effectively integrate ICT into the classroom. Here’s our verdict.

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Also: Linux survival guide: These 21 applications let you move easily between Linux and Windows

digiKam 6.1.0 is released

Filed under
KDE
Software

Dear digiKam fans and users, after the first digiKam 6 release published in February 2019, we received lots of user feedback to consolidate this important stage of this project started 2 years ago. We are proud to quickly announce the new digiKam 6.1.0, with plenty of new features and fixes.

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4 of the Best Screen Recorders for Ubuntu

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

There are plenty of reasons you might need to record your screen. Maybe you’re a developer looking to demonstrate an app you built. Perhaps you’re looking to do an instructional screencast. You might just want to show a family member how to do something.

You have plenty of choices when it comes to which screen recorder to use on Ubuntu. Some are simple to use, while others are more complicated but have additional features. It also depends on whether you prefer a GUI or the command line.

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Also: qt-fsarchiver

Best Free Clocks for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Digital clocks are an important utility to have because, without them, we wouldn’t be able to keep track of time without looking at our watch or analog clocks. And while we have covered several timer apps with the likes of Stretchly, Thomas, and Chronobreak, we haven’t reviewed any clock apps.

Today, I’ve decided to make up for that by bringing you a list of the best clock applications for Linux. They are listed in alphabetic order.

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7 Essential Linux Apps for Guitarists

Filed under
Software

If you have a digital audio device that can connect your guitar to your Linux computer, there’s a library of open-source software you can access for recording, editing, and processing the signal. These apps are especially well-suited to guitarists but can be useful for any musician.

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10 Best Linux Flashcard Software

Filed under
Software

A flashcard stores information on a set of cards, with the information being typically portrayed as words and numbers. The purpose of flashcards is to enable individuals to store verbal and visual information, often as a learning drill by way of spaced repetition. The Leitner system is a popular method of studying with flashcards using spaced repetition.

When you learn flashcards of new words each day for a number of days, this information is stored in your short-term memory. Flashcards also exercise the mental process of active recall. This is an efficient learning principle where an individual’s memory is stimulated during the learning process. Unlike a passive review (e.g. reading a book), active recall is designed to consolidate long-lasting memory of information. Transferring information from short-term to long-term memory is essential in studying for an examination.

Flashcards are one of the best tools for memorizing information. This is partly because of their versatility. They can help teach multiplication skills, learn a foreign language, recall facts, historical dates, in fact anything that can be learned in an intuitive way.

To provide an insight into the quality of software available, we have compiled a list of 10 excellent flashcard applications. Hopefully there will be something of interest for anyone who wants to memorize information. Here’s our verdict on each of the open source applications.

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QMPlay2 – Qt based video and audio player

Filed under
Software
Movies

I’ve been devoting the last year writing about a wide range of open source music players. Most of them I’ve been able to recommend, although I’ve encountered a few turkeys along the way. There’s a few readers who’ve suggested I branch out and review open source software that offers both video and audio playing capabilities.

QMPlay2 is one such player. It can play most video formats and audio formats. It plays all codecs supported by FFmpeg, and supports YouTube videos too. With internet radio, Audio CD, and a lot more besides, there’s lots of functionality on offer.

The software is written in the C++ programming language with the Qt 5 framework and uses FFmpeg.

Here’s my take on QMPlay2. I’ll look at the software’s widgets in some detail, and compare its memory usage with other video players. Your feedback is very important, so feel free to add your comments below.

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5 Command Line Tools to Break Your Dependence on the GUI

Filed under
Software

If you are a Linux sysadmin, you tend to spend a lot of time on the command line. Over the years I have learned to do much of my work without ever touching the mouse. Also, if I open a browser it is just too easy to be distracted. Social media, news articles, and funny cat videos all are designed to suck you in, and it works. In this countdown we will explore 5 things you can do from the command line to keep you productive and break your dependence on the GUI.

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9 Best Free Linux HDR Imaging Software

Filed under
Software

High dynamic range imaging (HDR) is an important technology for photographers. It is a collection of techniques that allow a wider dynamic range of luminances between the lightest and darkest areas of an image.

The human eye can adapt to luminances from 0.000,000,1 cd/m² up to 1,000,000 cd/m², and can cope with a luminance range of 1:1000. However, computer displays only offer a contrast of approximately 300:1. This means that the luminance offered by a computer monitor falls significantly short to what the human eye can actually process.

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Proprietary: AutoCAD and Expandrive on GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software
  • AutoCAD for Linux & Ubuntu – How to Install It

    Linux is a household name when it comes to the alluring world of open-source software. It offers a great deal of freedom for running software outside the Windows and Mac world. Under Linux, there are many different varieties, such as openSuse, Fedora, and the ever-popular Ubuntu. In this article, we will demonstrate how to install AutoCAD on an Ubuntu platform specifically, but the same steps can be followed for any other version of Linux.

    Running an open-source operating system (OS) has loads of benefits. Rather than being stuck to the platform specifications, you’re free to customize it exactly as you’d like. However, sometimes this can create a problem when you want to run software that isn’t available for your OS. When in comes to 3D modeling, this is specifically a concern for Autodesk’s AutoCAD, which is only available for Windows and Mac PCs.

    While there are plenty of other CAD alternatives, sometimes there’s no avoiding AutoCAD. Or sometimes you simply want the best. Either way, we’re here to walk you through a couple of options on how to get the best of both worlds: AutoCAD on your Linux.

  • How to install ExpanDrive for Ubuntu, Mint, Debian, CentOS, RHEL Linux

    Expandrive is an application that allows users to mount the cloud storage drives directly on the Windows, MacOS and Linux just like the local drives under the Expandrive app. It helps to make us hassle free of opening browser and log in to cloud storage for downloading or uploading some file.

    The cloud providers it supports are Dropbox, Google Drive, Google Team Drives, Amazon Drive, Box, OneDrive, OneDrive for Business, Sharepoint, OOpenStackSwift, BackBlaze B2, Amazon S3 or your own SFTP, FTP or WebDAV server and SMB/Windows File Sharing.

    Installation of ExpanDrive is pretty easy on Windows and MacOS, however, for Ubuntu and RedHat, the company has recently publicized the Linux version of the same software. Here we are showing the installation on Ubuntu and Redhat which will the same for other Linux OS such as Linux Mint, Debian, Elementary OS, Centos, Fedora including older versions of Ubuntu such as 18.04, 17.04, 16.04, 15.04…

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu: 5 Reasons to Upgrade, Sophia Sanles-Luksetich Interview, Ubuntu on Neural Compute Stick and Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter

  • 5 Reasons to Upgrade to Ubuntu 19.04 "Disco Dingo"
    On the surface, new versions of Ubuntu aren’t as big as they used to be. Like in the days before Canonical created its own Unity interface, the Ubuntu experience is now functionally similar to what you get in alternatives such as Fedora and openSUSE. But there are a few big reasons to be eager for what Ubuntu 19.04 “Disco Dingo” has to offer, with some additions demonstrating just how nice it is to have Ubuntu desktop developers spending more time working directly on GNOME.
  • Women and Nonbinary People in Information Security: Sophia Sanles-Luksetich
    Sophia Sanles-Luksetich: I am a rookie information security consultant. I currently perform bug bounty triage for companies which I am not allowed to name, but let’s just say most folks have heard of these companies. Before I got into information security, I was an IT generalist who dabbled in a bit of programming, Linux and privacy. Ubuntu was actually my first OS. It’s funny to think now that my decision as a 12-year-old could have impacted my career so much ten years later. KC: I must admit that it’s unusual that Ubuntu was your first OS. But that’s great! I use Kubuntu on my work desktop. Did that make you delve into Debian a bit? SSL: Oh cool! I have dabbled with Debian a bit, but not as much as most folks would expect. I think I learned a lot more soft skills using Ubuntu at a young age. Like when I couldn’t download my favorite game as a kid, I spent hours reading error logs, documentation and forums to figure out how to get the game working on my computer. Open Source Software (OSS) is also very modular compared to a lot of closed source software, so learning how software is built on other software was a big help. Now everything is miles down a supply chain that most people can barely scratch the surface of, at least in my opinion. [...] KC: Excellent. How did you get into Ubuntu computing initially? SSL: We had a family computer that stopped working. Rather than buy a new Windows disk to fix it, I asked around to my friends. Funny enough, one of my friend’s dad worked in information security, and I played board games with him and his son. I asked his son to give me a copy, and he messed it up by downloading it onto the CD rather than doing an image transfer. Lucky for me, I had a bit more a competent IT friend, Rikki, who ripped me a fresh CD. It’s funny, too; she was a lot more like me then, I thought. We both started in theater and ended up getting into computers just because they are resourceful and we were both people who loved the convenience for record keeping. I think what got me into OSS, to begin with, was the idea that I never had to pay for it. I am a cheapskate. I can think of a good chunk of my IT experience that I learned by trying to get something for free. I learned how to torrent, how to not screw up your computer on harmful sites. Always a fun time! [...] SSL: I think if I could give one piece of advice to new cybersecurity folks, I would tell them all to volunteer at conferences and talk to the attendees. You will learn a lot just by talking to people in the field. Oh, and of course, don’t discount soft skills and the fundamentals.
  • How developers are using Intel’s AI tools to make planet Earth a better place
    Biswas first gathered plant data from Google images, then used TensorFlow (widely-used machine learning framework in the deep learning space) and Open Vino (Intel’s neural network optimisation toolkit) to build an AI model. Once the images and videos of plants were captured the model is used to identify the cause of the disease, possible cures and preventive measures. To run these solutions, Biswas used Intel 7th Gen i5 NUC mini PC. [...] Ma took a digital microscope and connected it to a modestly powerful Ubuntu based laptop with Intel’s Neural Compute Stick connected to it. The entire system cost less than $500. The neural network at the heart of the system was able to successfully determine the shape, colour, density, and edges of the Escherichia coli (E. coli) and the bacteria that causes cholera.
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 575
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 575

Android Leftovers

Kodi 'Leia' 18.2 now available to download with bug fixes and performance improvements

The Kodi Foundation made the release candidate for Kodi 18.2 available last week, and today you can grab the final version. As you’d expect, this is a bug fix release with no major new functionality, but there are a number of notable changes including improvements to the music database performance and a new Codec Factory for Android. Read more

howtos and programming leftovers