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May/June in KDE PIM

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Development
KDE
Software

Following Dan here’s the summary of what happened around KDE PIM in the last two months. While the focus was mainly on the 20.04.x maintenance releases and KDE’s source code hosting and review systems migrated to a Gitlab instance during that time, development continued at full steam with more than 1,800 changes by 34 contributors.

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More KDE: 20.08 releases branches created

Malware in Proprietary Software - Latest Additions

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Software

The initial injustice of proprietary software often leads to further injustices: malicious functionalities.

The introduction of unjust techniques in nonfree software, such as backdoors, DRM, tethering and others, has become ever more frequent. Nowadays, it is standard practice.

We at the GNU Project show examples of malware that has been introduced in a wide variety of products and dis-services people use everyday, and of companies that make use of these techniques.

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The 10 Best Linux Network Monitoring Tools

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Software

Having total control over your network is essential to prevent programs from overusing your network resources and slowing down the overall performance. This is why you should install a network monitoring tool on your system, giving you a visual overview of everything that’s happening on your network.

To help you out, we have put together a list of the ten best Linux network monitoring tools. All the tools mentioned here are open-source and follows an easy and intuitive UI (mostly command-line based) to help you monitor the bandwidth usage on your network.

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Managing tasks with todo.txt and Taskwarrior

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Software
HowTos

One quote from Douglas Adams has always stayed with me: "I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by". We all lead busy lives and few ever see the bottom of our long to-do lists. One of the oldest items on my list, ironically, is to find a better system to manage all my tasks. Can task-management systems make us more productive while, at the same time, reducing the stress caused by the sheer number of outstanding tasks? This article looks at todo.txt and Taskwarrior.

The management of tasks is rather personal and people have completely different approaches and philosophies. This is, of course, reflected in the requirements for, and expectations from, a task manager. Requirements can also change as our interaction with computers changes. For example, while I put a lot of emphasis on managing tasks via the command line in the past, these days I'm more interested in a good mobile app (to add tasks on the go and to receive reminders) and web support (to get an overview of all tasks).

A good way to filter tasks is also essential for me. One of the reasons for using task-management software is so you can stop worrying about tasks until they become relevant. This requires a way to find relevant tasks when needed, such as when the due date is coming up soon or because you're in a relevant setting or place (often called a "context" in task-management systems). Going to the supermarket would be a good time to bring up a shopping list, for example. Task-management systems offer a number of ways to organize information that can be used in filters, such as tags, contexts (often stored as tags in the form of @tag, such as @home), and lists.

In a series of two articles, we'll review four systems for managing tasks and to-do items around which open-source ecosystems have formed.

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A visual guide to Lens: A new way to see Kubernetes

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Software
HowTos

There are many Kubernetes administration tools to choose from, whether you prefer a command-line utility or a graphical user interface. I recently covered k9s, a text-based interface that many day-to-day Kubernetes administrators enjoy, but you have to navigate through many Kubernetes-specific terms to use it. A lot of people who use Kubernetes less often would rather have a colorful, clean visual guide. This is where Lens, an open source integrated development environment (IDE) tool for administering Kubernetes clusters, comes in.

[...]

Lens is a beautiful and powerful alternative to managing Kubernetes from the command line. There are some times when you'll want to use the command line, mostly due to the drawbacks of manually editing charts before launching them or for tracking environmental changes. If you have good log-keeping practices in your cluster, this may not be a problem. If you are a visual person, Lens is a great way to explore your Kubernetes cluster and handle 95% of your administrative tasks.

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PTGui Panorama Photo Stitching Software Ported To Linux

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Software

PTGui as one of the leading panorama photo stitching software programs on Windows and macOS has finally been ported to Linux.

Last month the Linux port of the forthcoming PTGui 12 was quietly announced. This has been one of the leading feature requests for years to see the photo stitching program running natively on Linux while now it's finally happening -- including support for advanced features like OpenCL GPU acceleration

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Tauon Music Box – Modern Streamlined Music Player for Linux Desktop

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Software

Touan Music Box is a modern, comfortable and streamlined music player for the playback of your music collection.

The software is written in Python, and uses GStreamer or optionally BASS Audio Library for playback.

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Why I stick with xterm

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Software
GNOME

I use xterm. That's right, xterm. It may seem like an old school choice, and I do use GNOME 3 now as well, but after many years of trying some and ignoring others, then going back to old standbys, I find I don't need (or like) newer stuff like GNOME Terminal.

My philosophy: Start simple, improve over time, and aim for productivity.

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FOSSMint Promotes Non-FOSS (Proprietary) Alternatives to Microsoft

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Software
  • The Best Free Office Suites for Linux in 2020

    FossMint is particular about FOSS and related projects or partnerships. Sadly, though, not all the applications that are vital to certain needs fall under that category. Maybe someday they will but until then, potential users deserve the right to know about all their alternatives.

  • SoftMaker Office 2021 – The Premium Microsoft Office Alternative for Linux [Ed: How typical of FOSSMint to distract from what's actually FOSS]

    I imagine this will be great news for Windows users who recently switched to working from a Linux distro. You no longer have to miss your Microsoft Office workflow thanks to SoftMaker.

    SoftMaker Office 2021 is a Multi-Platform Office suite application created to be the perfect alternative to Microsoft Office Suite. It is designed to enable you to create impressive documents, calculations, and presentations with ease, coupled with seamless compatibility with Microsoft Office – no conversion needed.

  • FreeOffice 2021 – The Closest Free Alternative to Microsoft Office

    FreeOffice 2021 is the latest version of free office software from SoftMaker. In fact, you wouldn’t be wrong if you called it the free version of SoftMaker Office 2021 seeing as it offers the same suite of applications.

Trim Video Clips on Linux Fast with This New GTK App

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Software
GNOME

I won’t pretend that it’s difficult to trim video on Linux because, honestly, it isn’t; a plethora of ace apps designed to make basic cuts and simple edits exist (with Qt-based VidCutter and the best known).

But if you’re a GNOME user you might be on the hunt for something that feels and functions a bit more like the rest of your apps. If so, then there’s a new option worth looking in to.

The succinctly titled ‘Video Trimmer’ is a new(ish) addition to the roster of video trimming apps for Linux and it’s incredibly simple to use.

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More in Tux Machines

Learn NixOS by turning a Raspberry Pi into a Wireless Router

A lot of the Nix documentation seems to be aimed at a very particular kind of desktop user: someone who already has Nix installed! Such users represent an important use case, and the nix build configurations are easy enough to read. However, I definitely think there is on-boarding improvement work to be done in the Nix ecosystem. So, will I ever go back? I don't think so! This router was so cheap (~$40) and the Raspberry Pi 3B+ is so powerful that I get amazing performance throughout my entire apartment. If it ever breaks, the Pi will be trivial to replace. I am really happy with what I created. Even if this little project isn't original, it solves a real problem in my day-to-day life. In terms of NixOS as a Linux distribution, I think I now am totally on board. Nix has so many incredible advantages that (as a control freak who builds his own WiFi router) I just can't ignore or give up. The feature of Ubuntu that was keeping me on that distribution for so long was that "it just works" © ®. But Nix "just works" too. The only catch is that you need to know what "it" is that you want working ahead of time. I am also comfortable with responsibly using environments, so I think that increases my willingness to jump into a new OS framework. I am a little worried about moving from Ubuntu to Nix on an existing machine, but that is what external hard drive backups are for! Read more

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