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Software

Software: RedNotebook, Stretchly, Vesta Control Panel and GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program)

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  • RedNotebook 2.20

    RedNotebook is a modern desktop journal. It lets you format, tag and search your entries. You can also add pictures, links and customizable templates, spell check your notes, and export to plain text, HTML, Latex or PDF. RedNotebook is Free Software under the GPL.

    [...]

    RedNotebook 2.20 changelog:

    Fix drag and drop (#492, @dgcampea).
    Fix external previews (Eric Chazan).
    Document how to change the theme on Windows (#487, Ankur A. Sharma).
    Allow symlinking to ./run script (#509).

  • Stretchly – reminder to take breaks

    Many people who regularly use computers suffer from eye strain and fatigue. Looking at a monitor for a long time can strain your eyes or can make any other problems you are having with your eyes seem more apparent.

    There are lots of simple steps you can take to reduce eye strain and fatigue. These include adjusting the brightness, contrast settings, and text size displayed, as well as minimizing glare, and ensuring your room has proper lighting. Taking regular breaks is also very important. This is where Stretchly is designed to help.

    Stretchly is a cross-platform open source app that reminds you to take breaks when working with your computer.

  • Vesta Control Panel – Simple Yet Powerful Control Panel For Linux

    cPanel web hosting is easier to set up and manage. Users who are not familiar with Linux servers can easily maintain servers using cPanel, a GUI control panel for web servers.

    Buying shared hosting or managed web hosting can provide users a control panel. But both types of hostings have their own advantages and disadvantages. Read this article to know things to remember before buying web hosting.

    In this Linux cPanel series, I am discussing the best open source alternatives of cPanel. Most of the open-source alternatives of cPanel are free.

    Today in this article, I am going to talk about Vesta Control Panel, a free and open-source control panel for Linux servers. Vesta CP can be deployed on Red hat/CentOS (version 5,6,7), Debian (version 7, 8, 9), and Ubuntu (version 12.04 – 18.10).

  • The Best Photoshop Alternatives That Are Totally Free

    GIMP (Gnu Image Manipulation Program) is usually the default go-to alternative for anyone looking for Photoshop-level capabilities in a freeware desktop program. It’s not quite as feature-rich as Adobe’s powerhouse, but it comes with an impressive stack of tools nevertheless — and while it can be bewildering for first-timers, it shouldn’t take you too long to learn the ropes.

VokoscreenNG Screencasting App 3.0.5 Released (Ubuntu PPA)

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VokoscreenNG screencasting application 3.0.5 was released a few days ago. Here’s how to install it in Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 20.04, and derivatives.

VokoscreenNG is an easy to use screencast creator that can be used to record videos from computers screen, webcams, external cameras, etc. This graphical tool can produce educational videos, live recordings of browser navigation, tutorials of installations, record video conferences, etc.

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Wine 5.14

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Software

  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 5.14 is now available.
    
    
    
    
    What's new in this release (see below for details):
      - More restructuration of the console support.
      - Initial version of the Webdings font.
      - Beginnings of PE conversion of the MSVCRT libraries.
      - Various bug fixes.
    
    
    
    
    The source is available from the following locations:
    
    
    
    
      https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.14.tar.xz
      http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/5.x/wine-5.14.tar.xz
    
    
    
    
    Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:
    
    
    
    
      https://www.winehq.org/download
    
    
    
    
    You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation
    
    
    
    
    You can also get the current source directly from the git
    repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.
    
    
    
    
    Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
    AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.
    
  • Wine 5.14 Brings Initial Version Of The Webdings Font

    Wine 5.14 debuted late on Friday night as the newest bi-weekly development release with being less than a half-year to go now until the debut of Wine 6.0 stable. 

  • Quench that weekend thirst with the release of Wine 5.14

    The Wine team today announced the released of Wine 5.14, the next development release on the long road to Wine 6.0.

    If you're curious on what Wine is: it's the constantly improving compatibility layer that allows the running of Windows-only applications and games on Linux and other operating systems. It's one of the driving forces behind Steam Play Proton. Helping you to get whatever you need done on Linux, or perhaps so you don't have to give up that favourite game.

Magnus – A Simple Screen Magnifier for Ubuntu

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Looking for a desktop magnifier? Besides enabling the built-in screen magnifier, there are a few third-party applications can do the job.

Magnus is a very simple desktop magnifier written in Python 3. It shows the area around the mouse pointer in a separate window magnified two, three, four, or five times. Useful for users who need magnification, whether to help with eyesight or for accurate graphical design or detail work.

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Record Live Audio as Ogg Vorbis in GNOME Gingerblue 0.2.0

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GNOME

Today I released GNOME Gingerblue version 0.2.0 with the basic new features...

[...]

The GNOME release team complained at the early release cycle in July and call the project empty, but I estimate it will take at least 4 years to complete 4.0.0 in reasonable time for GNOME 4 to be released between 2020 and 2026.

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today's howtos

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HowTos

Telegram Desktop 2.2 Released with Auto-Night Mode, 2GB File Sharing, and More

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Telegram Desktop 2.2 is not a hefty update, but it comes with some very nice features that I bet you’ll like. One of these is a new limit for sharing and storing files as the application now supports files up to 2GB each, and it works with an unlimited number of files of any type. Until now, the file limit was set to 1.5GB.

Another cool new feature is Auto-Night Mode. When enabled, Telegram will match the current theme of your operating system, whether it’s Dark Mode or Light Mode. This is nice to have because you don’t have to keep night mode enabled all the time or manually enable it at night.

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Excellent System Utilities: glances – CLI curses-based monitoring tool

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Essential System Utilities is a series of articles highlighting essential system tools. These are small utilities, useful for system administrators as well as regular users of Linux based systems. The series examines both graphical and text based open source utilities. For details of all tools in this series, please check the table in the summary section.

Glances is a cross-platform system monitoring tool written in Python.

We’ve already featured gtop in this series. Why feature an alternative? Because Linux is about freedom and having a genuine range of alternatives? Or it’s because Glances is an excellent tool for system administrators that offers a vast array of information all in one central place.

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BigBlueButton: Open Source Software for Online Teaching

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BigBlueButton is an open-source tool for video conferencing tailored for online teaching. Let’s take a look at what it offers.
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Software: Nextcloud, OKD4 and Sigil

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  • Nextcloud and OpenID-Connect

    If you looked at the Nextcloud app store you could already find OpenID-Connect connectors before but since Nextcloud 19 it is an officially supported user back-end. So it was time for me to have a closer look at it and to try it out.

  • Trying OKD4: home lab needs to grow

    I've spent last week tinkering with OKD4, which is open source base for OpenShift. OpenShift in turn is Red Hat's distribution of Kubernetes. Such opensource/commercial differentiation is quite popular among Red Hat products. OKD/OpenShift relation is like AWX/Ansible Tower, Spacewalk/Satellite, WildFly/JBoss, oVirt/RHEV etc.

    I already had previous version deployed - 3.11, then called Origin, not OKD. My cluster consists of two old ThinkPads and a virtual machine, and I was planning to redeploy OKD4 on them. But first some PoC on virtual machines.

    So I started with minimal viable cluster – 3 schedulable master nodes. (There's a Code Ready Containers version, too – 1 node cluster, but it's non-upgradable). Requirements table looks scary – 4 CPU cores and 16GiB per master – but that's probably an overkil, right?

  • Sigil 1.3.0

    Sigil is a free, open source, multi-platform ebook editor. It is designed to edit books in ePub format (both ePub 2 and ePub 3). It also provides features for advanced users, like direct XHTML, CSS and XPGT editing. You can use it to add any of the metadata entries supported by the EPUB specification and create a hierarchical Table of Contents.

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More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows: Kubernetes, Open Source Security Podcast and "Reflecting On My Linux Journey"

  • Physics, politics and Pull Requests: the Kubernetes 1.18 release interview

    The start of the COVID-19 pandemic couldn't delay the release of Kubernetes 1.18, but unfortunately a small bug could — thankfully only by a day. This was the last cat that needed to be herded by 1.18 release lead Jorge Alarcón before the release on March 25. One of the best parts about co-hosting the weekly Kubernetes Podcast from Google is the conversations we have with the people who help bring Kubernetes releases together. Jorge was our guest on episode 96 back in March, and just like last week we are delighted to bring you the transcript of this interview. If you'd rather enjoy the "audiobook version", including another interview when 1.19 is released later this month, subscribe to the show wherever you get your podcasts. In the last few weeks, we've talked to long-time Kubernetes contributors and SIG leads David Oppenheimer, David Ashpole and Wojciech Tyczynski. All are worth taking the dog for a longer walk to listen to!

  • Open Source Security Podcast/Josh Bressers: Episode 208 – Passwords are pollution

    Josh and Kurt talk about some of the necessary evils of security. There are challenges we face like passwords and resource management. Sometimes the problem is old ideas, sometimes it’s we don’t have metrics. Can you measure not getting hacked?

  • Reflecting On My Linux Journey And Where It May Lead

    I ramble a bit about my Linux journey. Well, not just my Linux journey since my story begins before Linux existed. And even in the parts of the story that involve my Linux years, the story is really more about my journey with "free and open source software".

Mozilla: Rust 1.45.2 and Code Quality/Security

  • Announcing Rust 1.45.2

    The Rust team is announcing a new version of Rust, 1.45.2. Rust is a programming language that is empowering everyone to build reliable and efficient software.

  • Reference Sheet for Principals in Mozilla Code
  • Understanding Web Security Checks in Firefox (Part 1)

    This is the first part of a blog post series that will allow you to understand how Firefox implements Web Security fundamentals, like the Same-Origin Policy. This first post of the series covers the architectural design, terminology, and introduces core interfaces that our implementation of the Same-Origin Policy relies on: nsIPrincipal and nsILoadinfo.

KDE and GNOME: QML, MyPaint Brush Engine, Daniel van Vugt and Pitivi Summer of Code

  • QML Online - Can be everywhere!

    A new feature of QML Online is already available, allows it to run in any site/blog with minimal js/html code! Hopefully, our experience with QML examples, tutorials and documentation should change in the near future.

  • MyPaint Brush Engine [Final Phase]

    Coming to my project, it is almost complete apart from some finalisation related stuff that still is remaining. Perhaps, some review changes that my mentors shall give me once my current patch has been reviewed are also remaining. [...] I don't know why, but I always seem to have this feeling at the back of my head that something will come up that will be tough to handle and ruin my project. Though this has been happening even before GSoC started. That scares me a bit :( Anyways.

  • Ubuntu's Prolific GNOME Developer Is Looking To Tackle Deep Color Support

    GNOME could soon be playing nicely with deep color displays that aim to offer more realistic color reproduction thanks to the greater bit depth for each color component.  Canonical's Daniel van Vugt who has led many of the Ubuntu GNOME performance optimization initiatives and countless bug fixes for GNOME since Ubuntu switched back to using it as the default desktop is now looking at plumbing deep color support. Daniel recently has been working on better graphics clock frequency scaling as part of optimizations to improve the GNOME 4K experience particularly when using Intel graphics. The latest area he started dabbling with is deep color support. 

  •        
  • Vivek R: Pitivi: Object Tracking

    I’ve been selected as a student developer at Pitivi for Google Summer of Code 2020. My project is to create an object tracking and blurring feature. In this post, I introduce a feature in development which allows the user to track an object inside a video clip.

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (ffmpeg, libjcat, mbedtls, tcpreplay, and wireshark-cli), Debian (ark, evolution-data-server, libjpeg-turbo, libopenmpt, libpam-radius-auth, libphp-phpmailer, libssh, ruby-zip, thunderbird, and transmission), Fedora (chromium, clamav, claws-mail, evolution-data-server, freerdp, glibc, java-latest-openjdk, nspr, and nss), Gentoo (libsndfile, pycrypto, python, snmptt, thunderbird, and webkit-gtk), Mageia (botan2, chocolate-doom, cloud-init, dnsmasq, freerdp/remmina, gssdp/gupnp, java-1.8.0-openjdk, matio, microcode, nasm, openjpeg2, pcre2, php-phpmailer, redis, roundcubemail, ruby-rack, thunderbird, virtualbox, and xerces-c), openSUSE (claws-mail, ldb, and libraw), Oracle (firefox), Red Hat (bind, grub2, kernel-rt, libvncserver, nss and nspr, and qemu-kvm-rhev), Scientific Linux (firefox), Slackware (thunderbird), and SUSE (firefox, kernel, and targetcli-fb).

  • The 9 Best Cross-Platform Password Managers

    Bitwarden open-source password manager comes at no cost and rated as the best password manager. It provides a multi device sync option and unlimited passwords. Its free version helps in saving identities, credit cards and notes.

  • Linux Foundation announces new initiative to secure open-source software

    The Linux Foundation said today it’s presiding over a new foundation that brings some of the world’s most important open-source security initiatives under a new umbrella. The newly launched Open Source Security Foundation will host security projects such as the Core Infrastructure Initiative, which was set up in response to the infamous Heartbleed vulnerability discovered in the Open SSL protocol in 2014, and the Open Source Security Coalition, founded by GitHub Inc.’s Security Lab in 2019.

  • Technology and Enterprise Leaders Combine Efforts to Improve Open Source Security

    The Linux Foundation, today announced the formation of the Open Source Security Foundation (OpenSSF). The OpenSSF is a cross-industry collaboration that brings together leaders to improve the security of open source software (OSS) by building a broader community with targeted initiatives and best practices. It combines efforts from the Core Infrastructure Initiative, GitHub’s Open Source Security Coalition and other open source security work from founding governing board members GitHub, Google, IBM, JPMorgan Chase, Microsoft, NCC Group, OWASP Foundation and Red Hat, among others. Additional founding members include ElevenPaths, GitLab, HackerOne, Intel, Okta, Purdue, SAFECode, StackHawk, Trail of Bits, Uber and VMware.