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Software

Announcing Istio 1.6.10

Filed under
Server
Software

This release contains bug fixes to improve robustness. This release note describes what’s different between Istio 1.6.9 and Istio 1.6.10.

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KTextEditor - Small Things Matter

Filed under
KDE
Software

Thanks to the feedback & patches provided by others, I found a bit more motivation to take a look at the small things that seems to be odd in KTextEditor.

Interesting enough, if you once notice a small detail (like a dead pixel on your display you suddenly find after years of use), it really sticks out like a sore thumb…

Here two small things that caught my interest this week.

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Microchip releases open source GUI kit for its SAMA5 and SAM9 chips

Filed under
Development
Hardware
Software

Microchip has introduced a free, open source “Ensemble Graphics Toolkit” running on Linux for building C++ based GUIs for its Cortex-A5 SAMA5 and Arm9 SAM9 SoCs.

Microchip has released a free, Apache 2.0 licensed C++ GUI suite for the Linux-powered, single-core, 32-bit SoCs it received from its acquisition of Atmel. The Ensemble Graphics Toolkit (EGT), which is now integrated with Microchip’s Linux4SAM distribution, is designed for Cortex-A5 based SAMA5 SoCs such as the SAMA5D27, which is found on its SAMA5D27 SOM SiP module. It also supports Arm9-based SAM9 SoCs such as the 600MHz SAM9X60 SoC that was announced in March.

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Secure your messaging with Dino: An End-to-End encryption chat client for Linux and macOS

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Software

Dino is a privacy-focused lightweight open-source messenger for Linux desktops.

It supports end-to-end encryption out-of-the-box via OMEMO or OpenPGP encryption.

In addition to its strong encryption, Dino allows the user to disable read and typing notification either globally or for specific contacts.

Currently, Dino offers several distribution packages for all popular Linux and Unix distributions: Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, Gentoo, Arch Linux, Void Linux, Alpine Linux, NixOS, Guix and finally FreeBSD (Unix).

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Future Looks Bright for Free Video Editor Lightworks

Filed under
Software

Naturally changes are coming, as are new features and toolsets to ‘provide a fresh and innovative creative environment’ for content creators.

A major update to Lightworks, the first under its new owners, will be available to download in November.

It’s not clear (yet) wether Lightworks will remain a “freemium” app (it’s free to download and use but a license is required to unlock 1080p exporting) or if it will be made open source (something Editshare had on their roadmap).

Despite being one of best video editors for Linux (it’s available for macOS and Windows too) Lightworks has never quite achieved the sort of user-base that other (equally free) video editors have among ‘hobbyist’ editors.

But with the right direction the editor could yet cut through its pro-level competition to better meet the needs demanded by modern content production.

Or to put it another way: Lightworks is once again a core software product and not just an extra in someone else’s film.

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Cantata MPD Client 2.4.2 Released! How to Install in Ubuntu 20.04

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Software

Cantata, Qt5 graphical client for Music Player Daemon (MPD), released version 2.4.2 with various fixes. PPA updated for Ubuntu 20.04, Linux Mint 20, and derivatives.

Cantata 2.4.2 is primarily a stability improvements and bug-fixes release that features.

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Meet eDEX-UI, A Sci-Fi Inspired Linux Terminal Emulator With Some Cool Features

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Software

eDEX-UI is a cool sci-fi inspired terminal emulator that looks cool with a bunch of options like system monitoring. Check out what features it offers.
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11 Best Free and Open Source Linux Video Editors

Filed under
Software

Video editing is the process of editing motion video footage. In the new age of personal video, video editing is becoming a central function of the desktop, with the popularity of video editing software ever increasing.

Any self-respecting operating system that has ambitions on becoming the dominant force on the desktop therefore needs to have a good selection of video editing software. Video sharing websites such as YouTube are now enormously popular with hundreds of thousands of new videos uploaded every day.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Software
  • Linux Weekly Roundup #96

    We didn't have to many Linux distro releases in this week, only PC Linux OS 2020.09 and 4M Linux 34.0.

  • Call for testing: OpenSSH 8.4

    OpenSSH 8.4p1 is almost ready for release, so we would appreciate testing on as many platforms and systems as possible. This is a bugfix release.

  • k2k20 hackathon report: Martijn van Duren on snmp, agentx, and other progress
  • Cambrionix SyncPad54 USB Hub Offers 56 USB 2.0 Ports

    This week-end FanlessTech posted a tweet about Portwell PEB-9783G2AR Intel Xeon board featuring twenty USB 3.0 Type-A ports. After I retweeted it, some smart asses clever people noted it was just not enough:

  • How coffee makers and teddy bears could be putting your network at risk

    Ever worry that your smart TV might be sending data to someone who shouldn’t be looking at it? Have you ever wondered if your kids’ smart teddy bear is secretly recording them? We get it — cyberattacks are common. But you’re not being paranoid, either. Despite how safe they might seem on the surface, a huge percentage of IoT devices are actually at risk for attack.

    A new security report from Palo Alto Networks tells us that 57% of IoT devices are vulnerable to cyberattacks of “medium to high severity.” That’s well over half of all smart devices out there — and IoT tech isn’t just limited to gadgets anymore, either.

  • Chrome OS 87 Dev Channel brings working LaCrOS and Nearby Share to Chromebooks

    Can’t wait to try the latest upcoming features of Chrome OS? You’re in luck if those features are LaCrOS and Nearby Share of files to Android phones. The latest Dev Channel for Chrome OS pushes both of these features to your Chromebook in a mostly working state.

    My Chromebook got the Chrome OS 87 Dev Channel upgrade over the weekend and I noticed I could test these features out. If you’re not familiar with them, here’s a short recap.

    [...]

    That will greet you with the Linux version of Chrome, which you can set as your default browser. I wouldn’t recommend that while LaCrOS is in development, but that’s up to you.

  • Hackaday Links: September 20, 2020

    The GNU Radio Conference wrapped up this week, in virtual format as so many other conferences have been this year, and it generated a load of interesting talks. They’ve got each day’s proceedings over on their YouTube channel, so the videos are pretty long; luckily, each day’s stream is indexed on the playbar, so along with the full schedule you can quickly find the talks you’re interested in. One that caught our eye was a talk on the Radio Resilience Competition, a hardware challenge where participants compete head-to-head using SDRs to get signals through in an adversarial environment. It sounds like a fascinating challenge for the RF inclined. More details about registering for the competition can be had on the Radio Resilience website.

  • Why you need Apple support to secure the C-suite

    That’s a pattern that continues today. Your employees may not be living like the Jetsons at work, but your CEO, CFO, COO and all the other Cs and near-Cs are far more likely to be giving it a go. Which means your corporate data is already on iPhones, iPads and Macs – and it’s not just any old data: This is the most confidential data your company holds – the information your executive teams use to run the business that pays your team’s wages.

  • Softbank's two major competition cases: Apple-Intel antitrust suit against Fortress, and merger review of Nvidia's envisioned acquisition of ARM

    Softbank--though huge--was mentioned on this blog for the first time when Intel and Apple brought an antitrust action against its Fortress Investment subsidiary over the industrialized abuse of patents. That case is still pending, and another major competition case involving Softbank is around the corner: its contemplated sale of chip company ARM to Nvidia for $40 bilion is likely to draw regulatory scrutiny in multiple jurisdictions.

    While my focus will definitely remain on App Store antitrust cases (as an app developer and antitrust commentator, I'm doubly interested) and component-level licensing of standard-essential patents, the Apple and Intel v. Fortress litigation and the upcoming Softbank-ARM merger reviews are also worth keeping an eye on. In this post I'd like to share a few observations on both matters.

Best Torrent Clients for Linux

Filed under
Software

This article will cover various free and open source Torrent clients available for Linux. The torrents clients featured below have nearly identical feature sets. These features include support for magnet links, bandwidth control tools, tracker editing, encryption support, scheduled downloading, directory watching, webseed downloads, peer management, port forwarding and proxy management. Unique features of individual torrents clients are stated in their respective headings below.

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