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Software

Software: ElectronMail, fre:ac, Krita and More

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Software
  • ElectronMail – a Desktop Client for ProtonMail and Tutanota

    The majority of people on the internet have email accounts from big companies, such as Google, that do not respect your privacy. Thankfully, there are privacy conscience alternatives like Tutanota and ProtonMail. The problems is that not all of them have a desktop client. Today, we will look at a project that seeks to solve that problem for you. Let’s take a look at ElectronMail.

  • fre:ac – free audio converter and CD ripper

    CD audio grabbers are designed to extract (“rip”) the raw digital audio (in a format commonly called CDDA) from a compact disc to a file or other output. This type of software enables a user to encode the digital audio into a variety of formats, and download and upload disc info from freedb, an internet compact disc database.

    I recently wrote a review of abcde, a console based CD ripping software. I’ve received a few contacts asking me to take a look at a good graphical CD ripper. fre:ac instantly sprung to mind.

    This overview looks at the latest preview release. This release adds a new component system which has aided the inclusion of additional codecs.

    fre:ac depends on the BoCA audio component framework and the smooth class library. The software is written in C++.

  • Guest post: Coloring book & wall art created with Krita

    Also, being free and open source software, Krita allowed us to take time to work without the pressure of a subscription service. That accessibility is something we think is valuable to allow artists to take time to learn their craft without worry of a financial burden.

  • How to Install Latest Sweet Home 3D in Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, Higher

Server Leftovers

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Software
  • Deploying Kubernetes at the edge – Part I: building blocks

    What exactly is edge computing? Edge computing is a variant of cloud computing, with your infrastructure services – compute, storage, and networking – placed physically closer to the field devices that generate data. Edge computing allows you to place applications and services closer to the source of the data, which gives you the dual benefit of lower latency and lower Internet traffic. Lower latency boosts the performance of field devices by enabling them to not only respond quicker, but to also respond to more events. And lowering Internet traffic helps reduce costs and increase overall throughput – your core datacenter can support more field devices. Whether an application or service lives in the edge cloud or the core datacenter will depend on the use case.

    How can you create an edge cloud? Edge clouds should have at least two layers – both layers will maximise operational effectiveness and developer productivity – and each layer is constructed differently.

  • Certifications for DevOps engineers

    DevOps teams appreciate using DevOps processes, especially in multi- and hybrid cloud infrastructures, for many reasons. For one thing, DevOps breaks down barriers and enables agile software development and continuous delivery of IT operations. It is also popular in enterprises because it helps accelerate business outcomes through digital transformation.

  • SUSE YES Certification for SLE 15 SP1 Now Available
  • Deploy a SUSE Enterprise Storage test environment in about 30 minutes
  • MTTR is dead, long live CIRT

    The game is changing for the IT ops community, which means the rules of the past make less and less sense. Organizations need accurate, understandable, and actionable metrics in the right context to measure operations performance and drive critical business transformation.

    The more customers use modern tools and the more variation in the types of incidents they manage, the less sense it makes to smash all those different incidents into one bucket to compute an average resolution time that will represent ops performance, which is what IT has been doing for a long time.

  • RHEL 8 enables containers with the tools of software craftsmanship

    With the release of the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8, there is a new set of container tools which allow users to find, run, build, and share containers. This set of tools allows you to start simple with podman, and adopt more sophisticated tools (buildah, and skopeo) as you discover advanced use cases. They are released in two streams, fast and stable, to meet developer and operations use cases. Finally, these tools are compliant with the same Open Containers Initiative (OCI) standards, just like Docker, allowing you go build once, and run anywhere.

  • IBM's big deal for Red Hat gives it a chance to reshape open source
  • Cloudera Commits to 100% Open Source

    The old Cloudera developed and distributed its Hadoop stack using a mix of open source and proprietary methods and licenses. But the new Cloudera will be.

  • Cloudera relents, adopts pure open-source strategy

    Although billed as a “merger of relative equals,” last fall’s combination of Cloudera Inc. and Hortonworks Inc. was by all accounts a Cloudera acquisition of its smaller big-data rival. But it now appears that Hortonworks’ open-source business model has won the day. Cloudera Wednesday quietly announced changes to its licensing policy that will make its entire product portfolio available under open-source terms, effectively adopting Hortonworks’ business model.

    The move has important implications for the industry’s ongoing debate about how business models can be built upon a foundation of free software. Although Cloudera is a major contributor to open-source projects, its decade-old business has always been based on selling licensed software.

Software: LibreOffice, CDC, Syncthing, DaVinci and More

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Software
  • Simplified Tabbs for LibreOffice 6.3

    LibreOffice 6.3 will offer a new tabbed layout called tabbed compact. Focus are users with widescreen and a simple user interface.

  • Developer preview of Debezium Apache Kafka connectors for Change Data Capture (CDC)

    With the release of Red Hat AMQ Streams 1.2, Red Hat Integration now includes a developer preview of Change Data Capture (CDC) capabilities to enable data integration for modern cloud-native microservices-based applications. CDC features are based on the upstream project Debezium and are natively integrated with Apache Kafka and Strimzi to run on top of Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, the enterprise Kubernetes, as part of the AMQ Streams release.

  • Open-Source Peer-To-Peer File Synchronization Tool Syncthing 1.2.0 Released

    Syncthing, an open source continuous file synchronization tool, had a new release yesterday. The new Syncthing 1.2.0 adds QUIC with NAT traversal as a new transport protocol, fixes some bugs, and enables automatic error reporting.

    Syncthing is a free, open-source peer-to-peer file synchronization application written in Go, which implements its own open Block Exchange Protocol. The application, which is available for Windows, Mac, Linux, Android, Solaris, Darwin and BSD, can sync files between devices on a local network, or between remote devices over the Internet.

  • Best free video editing program for Windows, Mac, Linux

    Like any other downloadable software you could use, there’s going to be a learning curve, which might be the biggest downside to DaVinci 16. You may not have experienced DaVinci’s editing software yet but they work just like Premiere and Final Cut.

    The best way to learn the program and work out the technical kinks is by downloading it and giving the editing technology a try. It’s free to download and use, so check it out and see how it works differently than the programs you might pay a lot of money for.

  • How to be an IT rock star

    And while everyone know Linus Torvalds, in general, says Momjian, “If you are a creator of an infrastructure tool, you sit in an office and maybe you’re at a conference once every other month.” He argues that no IT decision maker really plans their IT strategy around a scripting language, a compiler or a text editor, or base it around some of the virtualisation tools out there. “They are interesting, but not a core part of a business process in organisations,” he says.

    But compared to the early 1990s when Momjian was a Unix admin, proprietary Unix systems are on life support. Compare the proprietary Unix vendors to the like Microsoft and Oracle, who are still selling relational databases. Since the early 2000s, Momjian has been a database man. “There is a lot of people who find databases really interesting,” he adds.

    For Momjian, the database industry is a good industry to be in. And there are some people in the open source community who are jetted around the world to speak to thousands of delegates about their contribution to database technologies.

    For Momjian, these are the true rock stars of the software industry.

Write a Novel with Open Source Tool

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Software
OSS

If you are looking for an open source tool to help you write your next novel, bibisco, ManusKript, and Plume Creator can help you get started.

Aspiring writers have no shortage of software that is supposed to help them along the road to a finished manuscript. Whether they are writing a short story or a multi-volume series, this software promises to organize them by providing software and revisable outlines, as well as a supposedly distraction-free full-screen mode and databases for characters, settings, objects, and drafts. On Windows and Mac, the leading software is Scrivener. However, since a Linux version of Scrivener has yet to reach general release, open source alternatives have sprung up like bibisco, Manuskript, and Plume Creator, each with its own approach to writing and outlining.

Read more

Software: Olivia, MAAS, Cloaker, Ceph Dashboard and Kubeflow

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Software
  • Olivia – Elegant, Powerful Cloud Music Player For Linux

    I spend an inordinate amount of time listening to music. My favorite pastime is to see my favorite bands, solo artists, and orchestras live. It’s such a life-changing and exhilarating experience. It’s one thing to be sitting at home listening to a CD or watching music videos on TV or on YouTube, but being in the audience, packed out in a stadium or music hall, takes it to another level. But it’s an expensive pastime. And there are only so many opportunities to attend music performances live. For the rest of the time, I’m listening to music from my CD collection or over the cloud.

    I dabble with a wide range of music. Linux is blessed with a mouthwatering array of excellent open source music players. But I’m always on the lookout for fresh, eclectic, and innovative music players.

    Olivia is an online/offline cloud-based music player like iTunes, Spotify, and YouTube Music. Olivia allows you to search any music online stream it, You can set the player to save your streams while playback. Olivia lets you create and manage your music library.

    Olivia has been in development for a mere 5 months. There’s no official release yet, with the software in a beta stage of development. Olivia is written in C++ and uses Qt, a free and open-source widget toolkit for creating graphical user interfaces.

  • MAAS 2.6 – ESXi storage, multiple gateways, HTTP boot and more

    Canonical is happy to announce the availability of MAAS 2.6. This new release introduces a range of very exciting features and several improvements that enhances MAAS across various areas.

  • Cloaker: Easy File Encryption With Windows, macOS And Linux Support

    Cloaker is one of the easiest tools to encrypt and decrypt single files with cross-platform support (runs on Linux, Windows and macOS).

    The free and open source tool has a very basic Qt5 user interface on top of which you drag and drop a file you want to encrypt or decrypt, enter the password (with a minimum length of 10 characters), choose the location where to save the file, and you're done. What's more, Cloaker is portable / requires no installation.

  • Managing Ceph with Ceph Dashboard

    With the release of SUSE Enterprise Storage 6, users can now take advantage of the advances made in Ceph Nautilus and the Ceph Dashboard, a snappy upgrade that makes managing and monitoring your storage cluster easier than ever.

  • Machine Learning: serving models with Kubeflow on Ubuntu, Part 1

    This article is the first in a series of machine learning articles focusing on model serving. I assume you’re reading this article because you’re excited about machine learning and quite possibly Kubeflow as well. You might have done some model training and are now trying to understand how to serve those models in production. There are many ways to serve a trained model in both Kubeflow and outside of Kubeflow. This post should help the reader explore some of the alternatives and what to consider.

Top 15 Best Music Tag Editor Software for Linux system

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Software

Music tag editor software implies a range of software that is used to edit metadata of multimedia files. Metadata stores all the information, for instance; artist, title, lyrics, conductor, album, length, track and embedded image in the audio file itself. There is numerous compatible best music tag editor software that is available on the Linux platform, among those some are open source and free thus; users can download and install them on their device.

Read more

9 Best Free Linux Astronomy Apps (Updated 2019)

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Software

Astronomy is a branch of science that deals with the study of celestial objects (including stars, planets, moons, comets, asteroids, meteor showers, nebulae, star clusters and galaxies) and other phenomena.

Like many others, I was introduced to the world of astronomy by the venerable Sir Patrick Moore. For anyone who does not know, Sir Patrick was an amateur astronomer who presented The Sky at Night, the longest-running television programme, for over 54 years, and made an outstanding contribution to astronomy.

Astronomy is particularly well suited to the layperson. It’s a wonderful hobby which has almost no age limits, it is open to individuals of all financial means, and there is always the potential for an amateur to discover something that has eluded professional astronomers, or to help monitor stars and track asteroids. Even with the unaided eye, there is much to study in the night sky including constellations, shooting stars, planets, and of course the moon, the Earth’s only natural satellite.

There is a wide variety of free astronomy software available for Linux that offer real benefits to astronomy enthusiasts. This category of software lets you map the night sky, plan detailed observations, control telescopes, present star charts, offer observing logs, and much more.

This article focuses on selecting the best free astronomy software available for Linux. Hopefully, there will be something of interest here for anyone who wants to study the sky. Here’s our recommendations.

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Geany text editor - a sort of genie

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Software
Reviews

I have to say I'm very pleased with Geany, and I'm sort of surprised - with myself - that I never gave it a more thorough examination in the past. But we shall rectify that, as I do intend, as a consequence of this little test, to try using Geany in a more serious manner, in my production environment. At the moment, on my Slimbook, I am using Notepad++, so maybe this could be a solid alternative.

Geany is a really interesting product - rich, extensible, robust, intelligent. It also looks the part, with a spacious, airy, friendly UI, and none of that modern flatness that ruins usability. You get a wealth of options and features, and while I do feel some small things are missing, I don't think there's any massive, glaring weakness in this text editor. Quite worth testing. Lastly, many thanks for those of you who recommended this program. May the code lint be with you.

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Software: TenFourFox FPR15, Firefox DNS-over-HTTPS, LibreOffice 6.2.5, Magnolia 6.1, SilverStripe 4.4, Tiki 20.0 and More

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Software
  • TenFourFox FPR15 available

    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 15 final is now available for testing (downloads, hashes, release notes). There are no changes from the beta other than outstanding security fixes. Assuming all goes well, it will go live Monday evening Pacific as usual.
    Also, we now have Korean and Turkish language packs available for testing. If you want to give these a spin, download them here; the plan is to have them go-live at the same time as FPR15. Thanks again to new contributor Tae-Woong Se and, of course, to Chris Trusch as always for organizing localizations and doing the grunt work of turning them into installers.

  • DoH! Secure DNS doesn't make us a villain Mozilla tells UK ISP's

    Mozilla says its baffled by the UK Internet Services Providers’ Association following the trade group's decision to nominate of the public benefit browser maker as the internet's 2019 villain of the year.

    The UK ISPA earlier this week proposed Mozilla, self-styled defender of internet freedom, as a black hat for its "proposed approach to introduce DNS-over-HTTPS in such a way as to bypass UK filtering obligations and parental controls, undermining internet safety standards in the UK."

    The filtering obligation comes from the UK's Digital Economy Act 2017, which includes a requirement that websites serving adult content in the UK verify the ages of website visitors. The previously delayed policy was to have taken effect on July 15 but was delayed again last month in a bureaucratic snafu. The rules are currently expected to take effect in maybe six months, maybe.

  • LibreOffice 6.2.5 is here with a lot of bug fixes, download now

    The fifth maintenance update of the latest LibreOffice 6.2 has just been released and it solves a number of issues the users have previously reported.

    As most of you would already know, LibreOffice is a free and open-source office suite that comes with various tools, such as Writer, Calc, Impress, Draw, Base, and Math. It is also worth mentioning that The Document Foundation is the brains behind this project.

  • Magnolia 6.1, SilverStripe 4.4, Tiki 20.0 all Released, More Open Source News

    Magnolia 6.1 has been released with a simplified product packaging under the new DX Core. This new edition contains nearly all of the modules from the Enterprise Standard and Enterprise Pro editions, in addition to exciting new features for both developers and authors.

Wine 4.12.1 (Bugfix) Released

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Software
  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 4.12.1 is now available.
    
    What's new in this release (see below for details):
      - Fixes for broken 64-bit prefix initialization.
    
    The source is available from the following locations:
    
      https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/4.x/wine-4.12.1.tar.xz
      http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/4.x/wine-4.12.1.tar.xz
    
    Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:
    
      https://www.winehq.org/download
    
    You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation
    
    You can also get the current source directly from the git
    repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.
    
    Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
    AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.
    
  • Wine 4.12.1 Released To Fix Broken 64-Bit Support

    Wine's bi-weekly development snapshots do not normally see point releases, but this time around there's an immediate bug fix release to Friday's Wine 4.12.

    Wine 4.12.1 has been warranted due to 64-bit prefix initialization breaking for this release. This regression in Wine 4.12 comes after they began building Wineboot as a PE file.

  • Prepare your Command-Wine Interface for an upgrade to version 4.12 (update - and 4.12.1)

    Update: 4.12.1 was released soon after, to fix "broken 64-bit prefix initialization".

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More in Tux Machines

Neon: A Wannabe Linux Distro For KDE Lovers

KDE Neon is a bit of an oddball Linux thing. Linuxland has an impressive collection of oddball things. Neon looks and feels much like a Linux distribution, but its developers assert quite openly on their website that Neon is not a real Linux distro. It just installs and functions like one -- sort of. That can make deciding to use it a little confusing. Neon appears to be a Linux operating system. It boots your computer. It displays a full desktop environment. It runs *some* applications so you can go about your computing tasks much like using any other -- ahh -- real Linux distribution. That last part is a clue to what makes KDE Neon different. Getting somewhat technical for a minute, KDE Neon is more of a specialty offering than a fully endowed operating system. Other distros support a wide range of applications from the same software format type. For example, Ubuntu runs .Deb formatted packages from the Debian Linux family. All .Deb packages will run on Ubuntu- and other Debian-based distros. Which desktop environment is used does not matter, be it KDE, Xfce, GNOME or whatever. Ditto for RPM-based Linux distributions, like Fedora and Red Hat. All you need is a package management tool or knowledge of the commands for apt, yum or pacman, depending on the distribution's Linux family. However, that is a skill set that lots of Linux users never had to learn. Not so with KDE Neon. Neon runs only a specific category of KDE applications: the latest. Neon's developers assert that their "pseudo" distro does not support most other software. In fact, non-KDE packages most likely will not even install on Neon. Read more

Hardware With GNU/Linux

  • Linux Foundation ? where do thou go? ? Stay out of the Desktop and you shalt be paid
  • Acer Chromebook R 11 C738T
  • Samsung Chromebook 3 - XE500C13-K02US
  • Acer Chromebook 14
  • HP Chromebook 11 G5 - X9U02UT
  • Acer Chromebook Spin 15
  • HP Chromebook x2
  • ASUS Chromebook Flip C213SA
  • Samsung Chromebook Plus - XE513C24-K01US
  • Samsung Chromebook Pro - XE510C25-K01US
  • ASUS Chromebit CS10
  • ASUS Chromebook Flip C434 - C434TA-DSM4T
  • Lenovo Chromebook S330 - 81JW0001US
  • Data in a Flash, Part IV: the Future of Memory Technologies

    As it relates to memory technologies, the future looks very promising and very exciting. Will the SSD completely replace the traditional spinning HDD? I doubt it. Look at tape technology. It's still around and continues to find a place in the archival storage space. The HDD most likely will have a similar fate. Although until then, the HDD will continue to compete with the SSD in both price and capacity.

  • Jonathan McDowell: Upgrading my home server

    At the end of last year I decided it was time to upgrade my home server. I built it back in 2013 as an all-in-one device to be my only always-on machine, with some attempt towards low power consumption. It was starting to creak a bit - the motherboard is limited to 16G RAM and the i3-3220T is somewhat ancient (though has served me well). So it was time to think about something more up to date. Additionally since then my needs have changed; my internet connection is VDSL2 (BT Fibre-to-the-Cabinet) so I have an BT HomeHub 5 running OpenWRT to drive that and provide core routing/firewalling. My wifi is provided by a pair of UniFi APs at opposite ends of the house. I also decided I could use something low power to run Kodi and access my ripped DVD collection, rather than having the main machine in the living room. That meant what I wanted was much closer to just a standard server rather than having any special needs. The first thing to consider was a case. My ADSL terminates in what I call the “comms room” - it has the electricity meter / distribution board and gas boiler, as well as being where one of the UniFi’s lives and where the downstairs ethernet terminates. In short it’s the right room for a server to live in. I don’t want a full rack, however, and ideally wanted something that could sit alongside the meter cabinet without protruding from the wall any further. A tower case would have worked, but only if turned sideways, which would have made it a bit awkward to access. I tried in vain to find a wall mount case with side access that was shallow enough, but failed. However in the process I discovered a 4U vertical wall mount. This was about the same depth as the meter cabinet, so an ideal choice. I paired it with a basic 2U case from X-Case, giving me a couple of spare U should I decide I want another rack-mount machine or two.

New Releases of GNU/Linux: Clonezilla, EasyOS and ARCOLINUX

OSS Leftovers

  • Kubernetes: The retro-style, Wild West video game

    The Kubernetes API is amazing, and not only are we going to break it down and show you how to wield this mighty weapon, but we will do it while building a video game, live, on stage. As a matter of fact, you get to play along.

  • Celebrating Kubernetes and 5 Years of Open Source

    5 years ago, Kubernetes was born and quickly became one of the most important open-source platform innovations. Today, its Github repository boasts 55,384 stars and 2,205 contributors! We?re not just celebrating Kubernetes and how much easier it makes our lives, but we?re also celebrating the open-source community that added to the container management tool; making it what it is today. When you have an entire community working together to innovate and improve, the possibilities are endless.

  • Public Statement on Neutrality of Free Software

    F-Droid won’t tolerate oppression or harassment against marginalized groups. Because of this, it won’t package nor distribute apps that promote any of these things. This includes that it won’t distribute an app that promotes the usage of previously mentioned website, by either its branding, its pre-filled instance domain or any other direct promotion. This also means F-Droid won’t allow oppression or harassment to happen at its communication channels, including its forum. In the past week, we failed to fulfill this goal on the forum, and we want to apologize for that.

  • What open-source culture can teach tech titans and their critics
                   
                     

    Yet Mozilla turns out to be much more consequential than its mixed record and middling numbers would have you believe. There are three reasons for this.  

  • Request Travel Support for the openSUSE.Asia Summit

    The Travel Support Program (TSP) provides travel sponsorships to openSUSE community who want to attend the openSUSE.Asia Summit and need financial assistance. openSUSE.Asia Summit 2019 will be in Bali, Indonesia, at Information Technology Department, Faculty of Engineering, Udayana University on October 5 and 6. The goal of the TSP is to help everybody in and around openSUSE to be able to attend the openSUSE.Asia Summit!

  • An Indian research university has assembled 73 million journal articles (without permission) and is offering the archive for unfettered scientific text-mining

    The JNU Data Depot is a joint project between rogue archivist Carl Malamud (previously), bioinformatician Andrew Lynn, and a research team from New Delhi's Jawaharlal Nehru University: together, they have assembled 73 million journal articles from 1847 to the present day and put them into an airgapped respository that they're offering to noncommercial third parties who want to perform textual analysis on them to "pull out insights without actually reading the text."

    This text-mining process is already well-developed and has produced startling scientific insights, including "databases of genes and chemicals, map[s of] associations between proteins and diseases, and [automatically] generate[d] useful scientific hypotheses." But the hard limit of this kind of text mining is the paywalls that academic and scholarly publishers put around their archives, which both limit who can access the collections and what kinds of queries they can run against them.

  • The plan to mine the world’s research papers [iophk: this is the kind of collection that Aaron Swartz died over, effectively killed]