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Software

Top 10+ Best Network Inventory Software for Linux

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Software

Network inventory software refers to the online tools, which deal with the hardware and software resources of a network, including the operational issues. Using this type of software, it becomes easier for administrators to know about the infrastructure components and their configuration systems. Also, it helps to keep the physical record of the network assets or equipment smartly. The components can be Firewalls, Routers and Switches, Storage Area Network, DNS, Servers, Load Balancers, SMTP, VPN, and more.

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Also: SPEC releases new version of CPU benchmark suite

GnuCash 3.7 Released

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GNU
Software
  • GnuCash 3.7 released

    The GnuCash development team announces GnuCash 3.7, the eighth release of the 3.x stable release series.

  • GnuCash 3.7

    GnuCash is a personal and small business finance application, freely licensed under the GNU GPL and available for GNU/Linux, BSD, Solaris, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows. It’s designed to be easy to use, yet powerful and flexible. GnuCash allows you to track your income and expenses, reconcile bank accounts, monitor stock portfolios and manage your small business finances. It is based on professional accounting principles to ensure balanced books and accurate reports.

    GnuCash can keep track of your personal finances in as much detail as you prefer. If you are just starting out, use GnuCash to keep track of your checkbook. You may then decide to track cash as well as credit card purchases to better determine where your money is being spent. When you start investing, you can use GnuCash to help monitor your portfolio. Buying a vehicle or a home? GnuCash will help you plan the investment and track loan payments. If your financial records span the globe, GnuCash provides all the multiple-currency support you need.

Musicalypse – audio player and server built with Web technologies

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Software

Over the last year I’ve reviewed a bucketload of open source graphical music players. They’ve been a mixed bag. Some are truly mindbogglingly awesome, others falling way short of my (fairly) modest requirements. The music players I’ve reviewed include ncmpy, ncmpc, and Cantata. I’ve also reviewed Nulloy, Museeks, Pragha Music Player, Yarock, qoob, aux.app, MellowPlayer, Kaku, Strawberry, Headset, Qmmp, QMPlay2, Olivia, and the truly sublime musikcube. My favorite music player is Tauon Music Box.

The vast majority of the music players I’ve covered are GUI software.

Continuing my series, here’s a further graphical music player. Bearing the handle Musicalypse, it’s cross-platform software that offers both an audio player and server functionality.

Musicalypse is an open source application developed and maintained by Thomas Gambet. It’s built with web technologies. In this case, this means the code is a combination of Scala and TypeScript built on a foundation of Angular, akka, and Electron.

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Proprietary software: How Apple is saving the banks (for a fee)

Mumble 1.3.0 Release Announcement

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Software

Mumble is a free, open source, low latency, high quality voice chat application.

Mumble is primarily intended for gamers, and was the first to establish true low latency voice communication over a decade ago, but finds good use in many different environments as well.

We heard from users who record podcasts with our multi-channel audio recorder, players seeking realism with our positional audio in games, Eve Online players with huge communities of over 100 simultaneous voice participants (I bet they make good use of our extensive permission system ), the competitive Team Fortress 2 community making us their required voice communication platform, hobby radio transmission users, and a variety of workplaces adapting Mumble to fit their needs - be it on-head mobile devices or communicating across countries or into airplanes.

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Also: FOSS voice chat application Mumble has finally put out the massive 1.3 overhaul

DXVK 1.3.4

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Software
  • DXVK 1.3.4 is out with a few quick fixes, plus more updates to Proton GE

    Two bits of Wine related news for you to peruse over this fine Sunday evening, as both DXVK and Proton GE have new releases available.

    First up: the DXVK 1.3.4 maintenance release was just put out to solve a couple urgent issues. One of these is a problem with Winelib builds and the Wine 4.15 release and there's a possible memory leak fixed with games using Direct2D.

    On top of that the game Control has "d3d11.allowMapFlagNoWait" enabled to improve GPU utilization and Quantum Break has a performance issue fixed for NVIDIA and older AMD drivers.

    The other project with a new release is Proton-4.15-GE-4, the unofficial version of Proton for Steam Play that pulls in a bunch of extras. Released today adding in some needed hotfixes for mf_install, an issue with the protonfixes import, the Warframe launcher should be fully working now with a wininet patch from upstream backported, the raw input patch was re-enabled and some updates for gamepad/mouse input.

  • DXVK 1.3.4 Released With More Workarounds, Performance Bits

    DXVK 1.3.4 has a Winelib workaround for builds with Wine 4.15, potential memory leak fixes for games just making use of Direct2D, a new d3d11.allowMapFlagNoWait toggle to help improve GPU utilization, and performance fixes for the game Quantum Break with NVIDIA and older AMD drivers. DXVK 1.3.4 is a small update but not bad for just a week's worth of changes and after several notable recently DXVK updates.

Software: imapautofiler, Draw.io and UpSwift

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Software
  • imapautofiler 1.8.1

    imapautofiler applies user-defined rules to automatically organize messages on an IMAP server.

  • Draw.io is a free Flowchart and diagram creation software for Windows, Linux, macOS and your browser

    Flowcharts are incredibly useful diagrams to explain process flows. Remember the phishing flow chart that Martin created in 2011? Or the flowchart about flowcharts?

    If you took a computer science class in school or college, you may know how to make one. Even if you don't, it's not difficult to learn how to create flowcharts.

    But how do you make them using a computer? Microsoft Office or Libre Office can be used to create flowcharts. But an application like Draw.io that specializes in drawing diagrams can be a better option. I tested the offline version of draw.io, (and only tested it with flowcharts).

  • UpSwift – Manage IoT & Embedded Linux Devices Easily & Quickly

    UpSwift offers a GUI based management interface to their customers to update, manage, control & diagnose IoT and embedded devices

A Comprehensive Intro to Darktable: A Free Lightroom Alternative

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Software
Reviews

Anthony Morganti of IAmMrPhotographer.com recently teamed up with photographer and fellow YouTuber Rico Richardson to produce a comprehensive introduction to the popular (and free) Lightroom alternative Darktable. If you’ve been wanting to try this open source RAW editor but don’t know where to start, this video is for you.

Richardson is an expert in Darktable who’s created many a tutorial for the RAW processing software over on his own channel. This 10 minute tutorial is a bit more broad than all that: a beginner’s guide that starts by showing you how to download the software off the Darktable website, moves into a detailed walkthrough of the user interface and available tools, and finishes off with a quick demonstration of Darktable’s powerful masking features in action.

If you already have Darktable downloaded, skip to the 3:58 mark to jump right into the UI; and if you already understand the import settings in the Lighttable tab, you can skip straight to the tools overview and editing demonstration around 7:20.

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Proprietary: Telegram and Flash on GNU/Linux

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Software
  • Telegram Update Adds Message Scheduling, Personal Reminders & New Theme Options [Ed: Proprietary at the server side]

    Messaging scheduling is among the new features added to the hugely popular Telegram messaging service.

    Telegram 1.8.3 (v5.11 on mobile) introduces the ability to schedule messages.

    This feature could prove particularly useful for Telegram group admins and channel owners (hi), as well as those who want to broadcast a missive at a specific time rather than having it posted (or read) straight away.

    To schedule a message in Telegram desktop is easy enough: right click on the ‘Send’ button in the chat toolbar, select the ‘Schedule Message’ option, and pick a date and time. You get a notification when your scheduled message is successfully sent (and presumably no notification if it fails).

    [...]

    You can refer to our guide on how to install Telegram on Ubuntu, Linux Mint and related distro should you want to get the service up running on your system.

  • Adobe Flash and Firefox 68+ in Gentoo Linux

    Though many sites have abandoned Adobe Flash in favour of HTML5 these days, there are still some legacy applications (e.g. older versions of VMWare’s vSphere web client) that depend on it. Recent versions of Firefox in Linux (68+) started failing to load Flash content for me, and it took some digging to find out why. First off, I noticed that the content wouldn’t load even on Adobe’s Flash test page. Second off, I found that the plugin wasn’t listed in Firefox’s about:plugins page.

Kdenlive 19.08.1 released

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KDE
Software
Movies

The first minor release of the 19.08 series is out with usability fixes.

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Hyper – terminal emulator built with web technologies

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Software

One of the reasons why I became hooked on Linux was the command line. The command line offers advantages day-to-day because of facets like its scalability, scriptability, simple design, and simple interface. At the command line, there’s so much power at my fingertips. Its continuing flexibility and power remain big draws to this day.

It’s true that some people consider the command line to be arcane and obsolete. They prefer graphical interfaces. And for non-technical people and beginners, few dispute good graphical user interfaces make life easier. But who doesn’t want the best of both worlds?

The power of the command line can be accessed on the desktop by using a terminal emulator. The terminal window allows the user to access a console and all its applications such as command line interfaces (CLI) and text user interface software. Even with sophisticated modern desktop environments packed with administrative tools, other utilities, and productivity software all sporting attractive graphical user interfaces, it remains the case that some tasks are best undertaken with the command line.

The terminal emulator is a venerable but essential tool for everyone using the command line. There are so many terminal emulators available for Linux that the choice is, frankly, bamboozling.

This article looks at Hyper, one of the newer terminal emulators available. It’s built with web technologies – JavaScript, HTML, CSS. The goal of the project is to create a beautiful and extensible experience for command-line interface users, built on open web standards. Hyper is based on xterm.js, a front-end component written in TypeScript.

Hyper is cross-platform support running on Linux, macOS, and Windows. It boasts that it’s fully extensible. Let’s see how it fares.

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More in Tux Machines

How App Stores Are Addressing Fragmentation in the Linux Ecosystem

According to DistroWatch, 273 Linux distributions are currently active, with another 56 dormant and 521 discontinued. While some of these have shared underpinnings, it still makes for an extremely varied landscape for companies and developers. It means developers must create multiple versions of their applications to be able to provide their software to all Linux users or just address a fraction of the market. Also, developers require multiple versions of build tools, which inevitably results in significant resource overhead. Desktop application distribution is complex across all operating systems in general; in Linux, this is further compounded by such fragmentation and inter-dependencies both in the packaging and distribution of software. For example, Fedora uses the RPM packaging format, while Debian uses the .deb format. Moreover, packages built for one version of a Linux distribution are often incompatible with other versions of the same distribution and need to be built for each version separately. Read more

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (ansible, faad2, linux-4.9, and thunderbird), Fedora (jbig2dec, libextractor, sphinx, and thunderbird), Mageia (expat, kconfig, mediawiki, nodejs, openldap, poppler, thunderbird, webkit2, and wireguard), openSUSE (buildah, ghostscript, go1.12, libmirage, python-urllib3, rdesktop, and skopeo), SUSE (python-Django), and Ubuntu (exim4, ibus, and Wireshark).

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 161 - Human nature and ad powered open source

    Josh and Kurt start out discussing human nature and how it affects how we view security. A lot of things that look easy are actually really hard. We also talk about the npm library Standard showing command line ads. Are ads part of the future of open source?

  • Skidmap malware drops LKMs on Linux machines to enable cryptojacking, backdoor access

    Researchers have discovered a sophisticated cryptomining program that uses loadable kernel modules (LKMs) to help infiltrate Linux machines, and hides its malicious activity by displaying fake network traffic stats. Dubbed Skidmap, the malware can also grant attackers backdoor access to affected systems by setting up a secret master password that offers access to any user account in the system, according to Trend Micro threat analysts Augusto Remillano II and Jakub Urbanec in a company blog post today. “Skidmap uses fairly advanced methods to ensure that it and its components remain undetected. For instance, its use of LKM rootkits – given their capability to overwrite or modify parts of the kernel – makes it harder to clean compared to other malware,” the blog post states. “In addition, Skidmap has multiple ways to access affected machines, which allow it to reinfect systems that have been restored or cleaned up.”

  • Skidmap Linux Malware Uses Rootkit Capabilities to Hide Cryptocurrency-Mining Payload

    Cryptocurrency-mining malware is still a prevalent threat, as illustrated by our detections of this threat in the first half of 2019. Cybercriminals, too, increasingly explored new platforms and ways to further cash in on their malware — from mobile devices and Unix and Unix-like systems to servers and cloud environments. They also constantly hone their malware’s resilience against detection. Some, for instance, bundle their malware with a watchdog component that ensures that the illicit cryptocurrency mining activities persist in the infected machine, while others, affecting Linux-based systems, utilize an LD_PRELOAD-based userland rootkit to make their components undetectable by system monitoring tools.

Oracle launches completely autonomous operating system

Together, these two solutions provide automated patching, updates, and tuning. This includes 100 percent automatic daily security updates to the Linux kernel and user space library. In addition, patching can be done while the system is running, instead of a sysadmin having to take systems down to patch them. This reduces downtime and helps to eliminate some of the friction between developers and IT, explained Coekaerts. Read more

Software: Zotero, PulseCaster and Qt Port of SFXR

  • Zotero and LibreOffice

    If you’re working with LibreOffice and need to create a bibliography, this software makes it simple to manage your citations. You can tell how few people use LibreOffice’s Bibliography Database by the fact that a bug that would take 10 minutes to fix has survived since 2002. Instead, those who need bibliographies or citations rely on other software such as Zotero, which can be integrated into LibreOffice with an extension. That robust bug is that the Citation Format in the database table is called the Short Name in the input fields. Even more confusing, the examples give an arbitrary name, when to work with the citation insertion tool in Insert | Table of Contents and Index | Insert Bibliography Entry, it should in a standard form, such as (Byfield: 2016) for the MLA format. Add the fact that a single database is used for all files – an absurdity in these memory-rich days – and the neglect of the Bibliography Database is completely understandable.

  • PulseCaster 0.9 released!

    For starters, PulseCaster is now ported to Python 3. I used Python 3.6 and Python 3.7 to do the porting. Nothing in the code should be particular to either version, though. But you’ll need to have Python 3 installed to use it, as most Linux bistros do these days. Another enhancement is that PulseCaster now relies on the excellent pulsectl library for Python, by George Filipkin and Mike Kazantsev. Hats off to them for doing a great job, which allowed me to remove many, many lines of code from this release. Also, due the use of PyGObject3 in this release, there are numerous improvements that make it easier for me to hack on. Silly issues with the GLib mainloop and other entrance/exit stupidity are hopefully a bit better now. Also, the code for dealing with temporary files is now a bit less ugly. I still want to do more work on the overall design and interface, and have ideas. I’ve gotten way better at time management since the last series of releases and hope to do some of this over the USA holiday season this late fall and winter (but no promises).

  • SFXR Qt 1.3.0

    I just released version 1.3.0 of SFXR Qt, my Qt port of the SFXR sound effect generator.