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Software

Leftovers: Software

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Software

Emulation or WINE

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Software
Gaming

Leftovers: Software

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Software

Wine 1.9.15

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Microsoft
Software

Software and Games

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Software
Gaming
  • Why and How to Use Ring Instead of Skype on Linux

    It is like when you say Ring is an alternative to Skype. No, no, it's not. Skype is ghastly. It is proprietary; it is demonstrably insecure; there is evidence that Microsoft uses Skype to siphon off conversations to the NSA; and the GNU/Linux version still lags behind the Windows one. So no, Ring is not an alternative to Skype. Ring is a full-featured, open source product that you need to know about.

  • In Search of a Linux iTunes Replacement

    If I’m to pick a favorite from just these three, I suppose it’s going to be Clementine. Sure, it might be a bit more resource intensive than the other choices and a little broken in places, but I still prefer it to what iTunes has become. As far as the differences between trying new software in a Windows versus a Linux environment, I’m not going to lie: finding my way around Linux is taking some getting used to. And that’s okay — I expected as much. Just as I’d expect trying to haggle in Portuguese might be a bit rough at first if I’m just learning the language and I’ve only known English until now.

  • 5 tricks for getting started with Vim
  • Vim or Emacs: Which text editor do you prefer?
  • Opera Developer Update Lands RSS Reader, Chromecast Capability

    For those still using the cross-platform Opera web browser, a new developer build is available today that provides new features.

    New to the Opera 40.0.2296.0 developer update that was released today is a built-in RSS reader. Opera admits this initial RSS reader is "pretty rough on the edges" but great to see them finally supporting it with their latest browser.

  • Opera developer 40.0.2296.0 update

    As we approach midsummer in this area, we would like to offer a developer update which includes one feature that was frequently asked for. You may now realize it is…

  • Kentucky Route Zero Act IV now Available

    The newest installment in the episodic adventure game Kentucky Route Zero has been released after a two year wait.

  • Overlord and Overlord: Raising Hell released for Linux, some thoughts and a port report

    Overlord and the Overlord: Raising Hell expansion have been ported to Linux thanks to Virtual Programming. I was able to get advanced access yesterday and here are some thoughts.

    Note: The Linux release is not yet on Steam. This is a DRM free release from their own store. It's using MojoSetup, so you can install it wherever you please.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
GNU
Software
  • GNU ease.js 0.2.8 released

    This is a minor release introducing transparent Error subtyping.

    This release succeeds v0.2.7, which was released 26 October, 2015. There are no backwards-incompatible changes; support continues for ECMAScript 3+.

  • A leadership change for nano

    The nano text editor has a long history as a part of the GNU project, but its lead developer recently decided to sever that relationship and continue the project under its own auspices. As often happens in such cases, the change raised concerns from many in the free-software community, and prompted questions about maintainership and membership in large projects.

  • Imgur-Screenshot Is a Nifty Screengrab and Upload Tool for Linux

    I recently began looking for a way to quickify (totally legit word) the process of uploading large screenshots to Imgur when I happened across an awesome little tool.

    It’s called Imgur-Screenshot and, like the name should already tell you, it’s a screenshot tool that uploads your snaps to the (popular, rad) Imgur image hosting service.

  • Firefox will get overhaul in bid to get you interested again

    The next update to Firefox, however, represents the first step in Mozilla's long-term plan to get you using its web browser once again. It hopes to rekindle the interest and influence it claimed a decade ago by revamping its core, which could make complex websites like Facebook snappier but make it more difficult for attackers to launch attacks over the web.

  • Mozilla Servo arrives in nightly demo form

    The Firefox codebase dates back to 2002, when the browser was unbundled from the Mozilla Application Suite—although much of its architecture predates even that split. Major changes have been rare over the years, but recently several long-running Mozilla efforts have started to see the light of day. The most recent of these is the Servo web-rendering engine, for which the first standalone test builds were released on June 30. Although the Servo builds are not full-blown browsers, they enable users to download and test the engine on live web sites for the first time. Servo is designed with speed and concurrency in mind, and if all goes according to plan, the code may work its way into Firefox in due course.

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • GNU Guile 2.0.12 released

    We are delighted to announce the availability of GNU Guile 2.0.12, a maintenance release in the current stable 2.0 series.

  • Update from La Mapería

    La Mapería exists right now as a Python program that downloads raster tiles from Mapbox Studio. This is great in that I don't have to worry about setting up an OpenStreetMap stack, and I can just worry about the map stylesheet itself (this is the important part!) and a little code to render the map's scale and frame with arc-minute markings.

    I would prefer to have a client-side renderer, though. Vector tiles are the hot new thing; in theory I should be able to download vector tiles and render them with Memphis, a Cairo-based renderer. I haven't investigated how to move my Mapbox Studio stylesheet to something that Memphis can use (... or that any other map renderer can use, for that matter).

  • You Can Now Use Netflix on Vivaldi and Other Chromium-Based Web Browsers

    Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard managed to create a handy script that would allow you to watch Netflix movies on Vivaldi, as well as any other Chromium-based web browser.

    As you're probably aware of by now, Netflix only supports the Google Chrome and Opera web browsers when we talk about watching movies streamed via their online platform on Linux kernel-based operating systems. On Windows and Mac the there are more browsers supports, including Mozilla Firefox and Safari.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla Thunderbird 45 Finally Lands in the Main Ubuntu Linux Repositories

After a long wait, Canonical has finally decided that it was time to upgrade the Mozilla Thunderbird software on all of its supported Ubuntu Linux operating systems, where it is used as the default email and news client. Read more

KDE Leftovers

  • Double Post – Lakademy and Randa 2016
    I Have a few favorites kde conventions that I really love to participate. Randa and Lakademy are always awesome, both are focused on hacking, and I surely do love to hack. On LaKademy I spend my days working on subsurface, reworking on the interface, trying to make it more pleasant to the eye, In Randa I worked on KDevelop and Marble, but oh my…
  • Plasma’s Publictransport applet’s porting status
    You might remember that I spoke about Plasma’s Publictransport applet getting some reworking during the summer. It’s been over a month since I made that announcement on my blog and while ideally, I’d have liked to have blogged every week about my work, I haven’t really been able to. This is largely down to the fact that I was occupied with work on a project back at my university and I shifted back to home from my hostel as well, after finishing four years of undergraduate studies.
  • KDE Community Working Group 2016
  • KDE Brasil Telegram group and IRC United
    That’s why the KDE Irc channel now has a bot that will forward all messages to our Telegram Channel and vice-versa, this way all the new cool kids can talk to all the old geeks around and continue to make the KDE awesome in their platform of choice.
  • Wiki, what’s going on? (Part 7)
    Tears followed by joy and happiness, discussions followed by great moments all together, problems followed by their solution and enthusiasm. Am I talking about my family? More or less, because actually I am talking about a family: the WikiToLearn community!
  • Kubuntu 16.04.1 LTS Update Out
    The first point release update to our LTS release 16.04 is out now. This contains all the bugfixes added to 16.04 since its first release in April. Users of 16.04 can run the normal update procedure to get these bugfixes.
  • Kubuntu Podcast #14 – UbPorts interview with Marius Gripsgard
  • KDStateMachineEditor 1.1.0 released
    KDStateMachineEditor is a Qt-based framework for creating Qt State Machine metacode using a graphical user interface. It works on all major platforms and is now available as part of the Qt Auto suite.
  • KDAB contributions to Qt 5.7
    The star of Qt 5.7 is the first stable release of Qt 3D 2.0. The new version of Qt 3D is a total redesign of its architecture into a modern and streamlined 3D engine, exploiting modern design patterns such as entity-component systems, and capable to scale due to the heavily threaded design. This important milestone was the result of a massive effort done by KDAB in coordination with The Qt Company.
  • Krita 3.0.1 Development Builds
    Because of unforeseen circumstances, we had to rejig our release schedule, there was no release last week. Still, we wanted to bring you a foretaste of some of the goodies that are going to be in the 3.0.1 release, which is now planned for September 5th. There’s lots to play with, here, from bug fixes (the double dot in file names is gone, the crash with cheap tablets is gone, a big issue with memory leaks in the graphics card is solved), to features (soft-proofing, among others). There may also be new bugs, and not all new features may be working correctly. Export to animated gif or video clips is still in development, and probably will not work well outside the developers’ computer.
  • KDE blowing out candles on FISL 17!
    My talk was the next. Its title was “20 anos de KDE: de Desktop a Guarda-Chuva de Projetos” (20 years of KDE: From Desktop to Project Umbrella). I presented the evolution process of our community, which led it from a desktop project to a incubator community. For those who did not attend the event the talk was recorded and it is available here. Below I also make available the slides of my presentation:
  • LabPlot 2.3.0 released
    Less then four months after the last release and after a lot of activity in our repository during this time, we’re happy to announce the next release of LabPlot with a lot of new features. So, be prepared for a long post.

Ubuntu tablet and smartphone: a personal "mini" review

So when Ubuntu and Canonical revealed they were partnering with actual, big manufacturers for Ubuntu mobile devices, a spark of hope was rekindled in my heart. Let it be clear, I am by no means an Ubuntu user, not even a fan. I left the fold nearly a decade ago, after having spent quite some time using and contributing to Kubuntu (to the point of becoming a certified “member” even, though I never ascended to the Council). In terms of loyalties and usage, I am a KDE user (and “helper”) foremost. I use Fedora because it just works for me, for now. So, yes, an Ubuntu Touch device would be another compromise for me, but it would be the smallest one. Or so I hoped. Read more

Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS Released for Desktop, Server, and Cloud with All Flavors

Canonical has announced the first point release of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, finally allowing users of Ubuntu 14.04.4 LTS (Trusty Tahr) to upgrade their installations. Read more