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Proprietary: Lightworks 14.5 Released, Carnegie Mellon is Saving Old Software from Oblivion

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Software
  • Lightworks 14.5 Video Editor Released With Same-Day Linux Support But Still No Source

    Lightworks, the long-standing non-linear video editing system that has offered a native Linux build the past few years after being challenged by delays for a few years, is out today with version 14.5 and comes with Linux, macOS, and Windows support.

    Lightworks 14.5 succeeds the Lightworks 14.0 release from a year and a half ago as the latest major update for this cross-platform software owned by EditShare. This new release has user-interface improvements, variable frame-rate media support, higher GPU precision settings, Reaper export support, AC-3 audio support in various formats, support for Blackmagic RAW files, and a variety of other enhancements.

  • Carnegie Mellon is Saving Old Software from Oblivion

    In early 2010, Harvard economists Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff published an analysis of economic data from many countries and concluded that when debt levels exceed 90 percent of gross national product, a nation’s economic growth is threatened. With debt that high, expect growth to become negative, they argued.

    This analysis was done shortly after the 2008 recession, so it had enormous relevance to policymakers, many of whom were promoting high levels of debt spending in the interest of stimulating their nations’ economies. At the same time, conservative politicians, such as Olli Rehn, then an EU commissioner, and U.S. congressman Paul Ryan, used Reinhart and Rogoff’s findings to argue for fiscal austerity.

Software: Nativefier and Linux NVENC OBS Screen Capture

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Software
  • Nativefier – Easily Make Any Website into Desktop Application

    Nativefier is a CLI tool that easily create a executable desktop application of any website with succinct and minimal configuration. Anybody can use it and it is a lot lighter than typical Electron apps.

    Nativefier is based on the electron-package and since Electron apps are platform independent, any Nativefiered app will run on GNU/Linux distros as well as on Windows and Mac Operating Systems.

  • Linux NVENC OBS Screen Capture – For The Record

    Linux NVENC OBS Screen Capture. How does it compare to a USB hardware capture device? With select NVIDIA cards and a NVIDIA modern driver for Linux, my OBS installation is able to take advantage of GPU video capturing.

8 of the Best Free Linux Comic Book Viewers (Updated 2018)

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Software

A comic book is a magazine which consists of narrative artwork in the form of sequential images with text that represent individual scenes. Panels are often accompanied by brief descriptive prose and written narrative, usually dialog contained in word balloons emblematic of the comics art form. Comics are used to tell a story, and are published in a number of different formats including comic strips, comic books, webcomics, Manga, and graphic novels. Some comics have been published in a tabloid form. The largest comic book market is Japan.

Many users associate desktop Linux with their daily repetitive grind. However, we are always on the look out for applications that help make Linux fun to use. It really is a great platform for entertainment.

Some document viewers offer a good range of different formats. Although they are not dedicated comic book viewers, Evince and okular have support for the common comic book archive files, and merit mention here.

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Zulip – Most Productive Chat Application for Group or Team Chat

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Software

Zulip is an open source, powerful and easily extendable group or team chat application powered by Electron and React Native. It runs on every major operating system: Linux, Windows, MacOS; Android, iOS, and also has a web client.

It supports over 90 native integrations with external applications, under different categories including interactive bots, version control (Github, Codebase, Bitbucket etc.), communication, customer support, deployment, financial (Stripe), marketing, monitoring tools (Nagios and more), integration frameworks, productivity (Drop box, Google calender etc.) and so many others.

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Stretchly – An Open-Source, Customizable Time Reminder App

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GNU
Linux
Software

We have covered several time apps including Chronobreak, Gnome P0modoro, and Thomas. Today’s featured timer app goes by the name of Stretchly and it is among the most customizable timer apps on the free market.

Stretchly is an open-source project that reminds its users to take breaks from working on the computer. It runs in the system tray and displays a prompt for you to take a 20-second break every 10 minutes by default.

Its app window uses a minimalist design UI with informative text, and tons of customization options including break duration, alert tones, and strict mode. Stretchly allows you to cut breaks short and return to work, enabling strict mode will disable that feature.

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Sysget – A Front-end For Popular Package Managers

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GNU
Linux
Software

Are you a distro-hopper who likes to try new Linux OSs every few days? If so, I have something for you. Say hello to Sysget, a front-end for popular package managers in Unix-like operating systems. You don’t need to learn about every package managers to do basic stuffs like installing, updating, upgrading and removing packages. You just need to remember one syntax for every package manager on every Unix-like operating systems. Sysget is a wrapper script for package managers and it is written in C++.

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Programs and Programming: DICOM Viwers, Turtl, Weblate, Rust and Python

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Development
Software
  • Excellent Free DICOM Viewers – Medical Imaging Software

    DICOM (an acronym for Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) is a worldwide standard in Health IT and is provided by the National Electrical Manufacturers Assocation (NEMA). It’s the standard open image format used to handle, store, print and transmit information in medical imaging. This standard specifies the way medical images and metadata like study or patient related data are stored and communicated over different digital medias.

    DICOM is a binary protocol and data format. The binary protocol specifies a set of networking protocols, the syntax and specification of commands that can be exchanged with these protocols, and a set of media storage services. It’s an entire specification of the elements required to achieve a practical level of automatic interoperability between biomedical imaging computer systems—from application layer to bit-stream encoding.

    DICOM files can be exchanged between two entities that are capable of receiving image and patient data in DICOM format.

  • Encrypted Evernote Alternative Turtl v0.7 Includes Rewritten Server, New Spaces Feature

    Turtl was updated to version 0.7 yesterday, the new release shipping with a rewritten server, among other changes. I'll cover the new version in the second part of this article, after an introduction to Turtl.

    Turtl is a "secure, encrypted Evernote alternative". The free and open source tool, which is considered beta software, can be used to take notes, save bookmarks, store documents and images, and anything else you may need, in a safe place.

    There are Turtl applications available for Linux, Windows, macOS and Android, while an iOS application should also be available in the future. Chrome and Firefox extensions are available to easily bookmark the page you're on, great for quickly saving sites for later.

    The Turtl developers offer the service (hosted server) for free, but a premium service is planned for the future. However, the Turtl server is free and open source software, so you can install and use your own instance.

  • Weblate 3.2.1

    Weblate 3.2.1 has been released today. It's a bugfix release for 3.2 fixing several minor issues which appeared in the release.

  • This Week in Rust 255
  • Code Quality & Formatting for Python

    black, the uncompromising Python code formatter, has arrived in Debian unstable and testing.

    black is being adopted by the LAVA Software Community Project in a gradual way and the new CI will be checking that files which have been formatted by black stay formatted by black in merge requests.

    There are endless ways to format Python code and pycodestyle and pylint are often too noisy to use without long lists of ignored errors and warnings.

Convert Screenshots of Equations into LaTeX Instantly With This Nifty Tool

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Software

Mathpix is a nifty little tool that allows you to take screenshots of complex mathematical equations and instantly converts it into LaTeX editable text.
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Software and HowTos: Rancher, Laverna, gtop, Manuals, KeeWeb and More

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Software
HowTos
  • Rancher Takes on Multicloud Kubernetes Management

    One thing that happens over time is that organizations can end up with multiple deployments in different places, something that is commonly referred to as - multicloud. It's a deployment challenge that Rancher Labs has built it namesake Rancher cloud orchestration platform to help enable.

    [...]

    With the multicloud world, Williams said its critically important to put in place all of the policy and user management that is needed to have a consistent approach across disparate Kubernetes deployments.

    Rancher is now and has always been open source software that is entirely free for any organization to use. Rancher Labs charges for commercial support, which Williams said is a stable and growing business. He said that Rancher Labs has both outbound sales people as well as channel relationships and today has over 200 customers.

    "But that's a pretty small percentage of the total of 10,000 companies use Rancher everyday to run their containers," he said.

    Williams said that Rancher is Kubernetes, with Docker containers and a management plane and it's something that larger organizations really care about once those services are in production.

  • Taking notes with Laverna, a web-based information organizer

    I don’t know anyone who doesn’t take notes. Most of the people I know use an online note-taking application like Evernote, Simplenote, or Google Keep.

    All of those are good tools, but they’re proprietary. And you have to wonder about the privacy of your information—especially in light of Evernote’s great privacy flip-flop of 2016. If you want more control over your notes and your data, you need to turn to an open source tool—preferably one that you can host yourself.

    And there are a number of good open source alternatives to Evernote. One of these is Laverna. Let’s take a look at it.

  • Essential System Tools: gtop – System monitoring dashboard for the terminal

    This is the second in our series of articles highlighting essential system tools. These are small utilities, useful for system administrators as well as regular users of Linux based systems. The series examines both graphical and text based open source utilities.

    We previously covered ps_mem, a really useful memory utility. This time, another console utility is under the spotlight. It’s called gtop.

    gtop is an open source system monitoring utility written in JavaScript. Our Group Test covered alternatives to top. In particular, htop is a remarkable system monitoring tool. gtop receives far less exposure than htop, but deserves more publicity. Why? Let’s see.

  • Good Alternatives To Man Pages Every Linux User Needs To Know

    A man page, acronym of manual page, is a software documentation found in all Unix-like operating systems. Some man pages are short; some are comprehensive. A man page is divided into several parts, organized  with headings for each section, such as NAME, SYNOPSIS, CONFIGURATION, DESCRIPTION, OPTIONS, EXIT STATUS, RETURN VALUE, ERRORS, ENVIRONMENT, FILES, VERSIONS, CONFORMING TO, NOTES, BUGS, EXAMPLE, AUTHORS, and SEE ALSO.

    Sometimes, I find it really time-consuming when I wanted to learn a practical example of a given Unix command using man pages. So, I started to look for some good alternatives to man pages which are focused on mostly examples, skipping all other comprehensive text parts. Thankfully, there are some really good alternatives out there. In this tutorial, we will be discussing 4 alternatives to man pages for Unix-like operating systems.

  • KeeWeb – An Open Source, Cross Platform Password Manager

    If you’ve been using the internet for any amount of time, chances are, you have a lot of accounts on a lot of websites. All of those accounts must have passwords, and you have to remember all those passwords. Either that, or write them down somewhere. Writing down passwords on paper may not be secure, and remembering them won’t be practically possible if you have more than a few passwords. This is why Password Managers have exploded in popularity in the last few years. A password Manager is like a central repository where you store all your passwords for all your accounts, and you lock it with a master password. With this approach, the only thing you need to remember is the Master password.

  • Plasma secrets: Make the desktop remember window position
  • Create a role on the Chef server with a description
  • Cat Command in Linux: Essential and Advanced Examples
  • Fix ‘add-apt-repository command not found’ Error on Ubuntu and Debian
  • How to Customize SSH Settings For Maximum Security
  • Python at the pump: A script for filling your gas tank
  • Linux vdir Command Tutorial for Beginners (8 Examples)
  • Free eBook from Packt - Linux Shell Scripting Cookbook - Third Edition

Software: Krita, scikit-survival, RcppCCTZ, Weblate

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Software
  • Krita October Sprint Day 1

    On Saturday, the first people started to arrive for this autumn’s Krita development sprint. It’s also the last week of the fundraiser: we’re almost at 5 months of bug fixing funded! All in all, 8 people are here: Boudewijn, the maintainer, Dmitry, whose work is being sponsored by the Krita Foundation through this fundraiser, Wolthera, who works on the manual, videos, code, scripting, Ivan, who did the brush vectorization Google Summer of Code project this year, Jouni, who implemented the animation plugin, session management and the reference images tool, Emmet and Eoin who started hacking on Krita a short while ago, and who have worked on the blending color picker and kinetic scrolling.

  • scikit-survival 0.6.0 released

    Today, I released scikit-survival 0.6.0. This release is long overdue and adds support for NumPy 1.14 and pandas up to 0.23. In addition, the new class sksurv.util.Surv makes it easier to construct a structured array from NumPy arrays, lists, or a pandas data frame. The examples below showcase how to create a structured array for the dependent variable.

  • RcppCCTZ 0.2.4

    RcppCCTZ uses Rcpp to bring CCTZ to R. CCTZ is a C++ library for translating between absolute and civil times using the rules of a time zone. In fact, it is two libraries. One for dealing with civil time: human-readable dates and times, and one for converting between between absolute and civil times via time zones. And while CCTZ is made by Google(rs), it is not an official Google product. The RcppCCTZ page has a few usage examples and details. This package was the first CRAN package to use CCTZ; by now at least two others do—but decided in their infinite wisdom to copy the sources yet again into their packages. Sigh.

  • Weblate 3.2

    Weblate 3.2 has been released today. It's fiftieth release of Weblate and also it's release with most fixed issues on GitHub. The most important change is in the background - introduction of Celery to process background tasks. The biggest user visible change is extended translation memory.

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More in Tux Machines

Themes With Emphasis on GTK/GNOME

  • Stylish Gtk Themes Makes Your Linux Desktop Look Stylish
    There are plenty of nice themes available for Gnome desktop and many of them are in active development. Stylish theme pack is one of the great looking pack around since 2014 and constantly evolving. It offers stylish clean and flat design themes for Gtk-3 and Gtk-2, including Gnome shell themes. Stylish theme pack is based Materia theme and support almost every desktop environment such as Gnome, Cinnamon, Mate, Xfce, Mate, Budgie, Panteon, etc. We are offering Stylish themes via our PPA for Ubuntu/Linux Mint. If you are using distribution other than Ubuntu/Linux Mint then download this pack directly from its page and install it in this location "~/.themes" or "/usr/share/themes". Since Stylish theme pack is in active development that means if you encounter any kind of bug or issue with it then report it to get fixed in the next update.
  • Delft: Another Great Icon Pack In Town Forked From Faenza Icons
    In past, you may have used Faenza icon theme or you still have it set on your desktop. Delft icons are revived version of Faenza and forked from Faenza icon theme, maybe it is not right to say 'revived' because it looks little different from Faenza theme and at the same time it stays close to the original Faenza icons, it is released under license GNU General Public License V3. The theme was named after a dutch city, which is known for its history, its beauty, and Faenza in Italy. The author who is maintaining Delft icons saw that Faenza icons haven't been updated from some years and thought to carry this project. There are some icons adopted from the Obsidian icon theme. Delft icon pack offer many variants (Delft, Delft-Amber, Delft-Aqua, Delft-Blue, Delft-Dark, Delft-Gray, Delft-Green, Delft-Mint, Delft-Purple, Delft-Red, Delft-Teal) including light and dark versions for light/dark themes, you can choose appropriate one according to your desktop theme. These icons are compatible with most of the Linux desktop environments such as Gnome, Unity, Cinnamon, Mate, Lxde, Xfce and others. Many application icons available in this icons pack and if you find any missing icon or want to include something in this icon pack or face any kind of bug then report it to creator.
  • Give Your Desktop A Sweet Outlook With Sweet Themes Give Your Desktop A Sweet Outlook With Sweet Themes
    It is feels bit difficult to describe this theme we are going to introduce here today. Sweet theme pack looks and feel very different on the desktop but at the same time make the Linux desktop elegant and eye catching. Maybe these are not perfect looking themes available but it lineup in the perfect theme queue. You may say, I don't like it in screenshots, let me tell you that you should install it on your system and if you don't like then you already have option to remove it. So there is no harm to try a new thing, maybe this is next best theme pack for your Linux desktop.

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Open-source hardware could defend against the next generation of hacking

Imagine you had a secret document you had to store away from prying eyes. And you have a choice: You could buy a safe made by a company that kept the workings of its locks secret. Or you could buy a safe whose manufacturer openly published the designs, letting everyone – including thieves – see how they’re made. Which would you choose? It might seem unexpected, but as an engineering professor, I’d pick the second option. The first one might be safe – but I simply don’t know. I’d have to take the company’s word for it. Maybe it’s a reputable company with a longstanding pedigree of quality, but I’d be betting my information’s security on the company upholding its traditions. By contrast, I can judge the security of the second safe for myself – or ask an expert to evaluate it. I’ll be better informed about how secure my safe is, and therefore more confident that my document is safe inside it. That’s the value of open-source technology. Read more