Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Software

Applications: GIMP, Partclone, Samba, Tidal

Filed under
Software
  • 6 Cheap Alternatives to Adobe Photoshop

    Adobe Photoshop is easily the industry standard when it comes to graphic and photo editing. We don’t just edit a photo these days, but we ‘photoshop’ it—but ‘shopping things with the real deal isn’t cheap.

    Working on a subscription plan basis, it’ll cost you from $9.99 a month, depending on the package you select. Crucially, you’re renting the product—you’ll never actually own a Photoshop license.

    [...]

    For many years, GIMP has been touted as the ideal free alternative to Photoshop. There’s a good reason for that—it offers very similar functionality to Adobe’s behemoth.

    Providing many professional level features, it includes layers, customizable brushes, filters, and automatic image enhancement tools for those short on time. It further expands its potential through a huge number of plugins, thanks to its very active community. Effectively, it’s in constant development. New features are commonplace, while bugs are few and far between.

    The downside? There’s no native support for RAW files—a key component in photo editing—you have to install an additional plugin straight away for such functionality. Also, GIMP’s highly customizable interface can be intimidating for novice users. While Photoshop is instantly accessible, GIMP requires a little tweaking and manipulation to get things how you like them to look, although recent updates have made it look more like its main competition.

    It’s worth sticking with, of course, given it’s entirely free to use, but for the novice user, it might take a little time to gel.

  • Partclone – A Versatile Free Software for Partition Imaging and Cloning

    Partclone is a free and open-source tool for creating and cloning partition images brought to you by the developers of Clonezilla. In fact, Partclone is one of the tools that Clonezilla is based on.

    It provides users with the tools required to backup and restores used partition blocks along with high compatibility with several file systems thanks to its ability to use existing libraries like e2fslibs to read and write partitions e.g. ext2.

  • Samba 4.8 RC1 Released, Samba 4.9 In Development On Git

    The first release candidate of Samba 4.8 is now available for this popular open-source project implementing the SMB/CIFS protocols.

  • Listen to Tidal Music from the Command Line

    Tidal subscribers have a new way to listen to the high-fidelity music streaming service while using the Linux desktop. The Spotify rival touts better sound quality and bigger royalty cheques for artists, but it doesn’t provide a desktop Tidal music app for Linux.

Software: uGet, GNU/Linux Media Players, Opera 51

Filed under
Software
  • uGet 2.2.0 and uGet for Android 1.4.8 Now Available!

    After almost a year of development, we are excited to announce the immediate availability of the latest stable version of uGet, version 2.2.0 and the latest version of uGet for Android, version 1.4.8. These releases include a LOT of improvements such as bug fixes, maintenance improvements and many highly requested features like support for Downloading from YouTube.

  • 7 Best Open Source Linux Media Players You Need To Try In 2018

    Honestly speaking, I have started using media player software less often. That’s probably because of the online streaming boom in the last couple of years. It’s hard to remember the last time I slid a DVD into my computer. Most of the time, I find myself binge-watching TV shows on Prime Video (it even has a free trial in India), or some random stuff on YouTube.

  • Opera 51 Browser Enters Beta with Support for AppleScript and Many New Features

    The upcoming Opera 51 web browser was promoted on Thursday to the beta channel, giving users a more in-depth look at what to expect from the final release, which will be available next month.

Wine 3.0 RC6

Filed under
Software
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 3.0-rc6 is now available.

  • Wine continues to mature with Wine 3.0 RC6

    The big Wine 3.0 is inching ever closer with the release of the sixth release candidate today with bug fixes.

    Since Wine is currently in a code-freeze, no new features are being pulled in so they can make the 3.0 release as stable as possible, which means it's not too exciting. Still, every software needs to go through a period of stability to ensure a solid foundation to continue improving features.

  • Wine 3.0-RC6 Released While Wine 3.0.0 Should Be Near

    The sixth weekly release candidate of the upcoming Wine 3.0 is now available for testing.

    Being into the code freeze since the beginning of December, Wine 3.0-RC6 just continues the bug-fixing train. Wine 3.0-RC6 has a total of 14 known fixes ranging from Valgrind memory fixes to a Powerpoint 2017/2010 slideshow problem.

Software: OpenGenus, StackEdit, Lightworks

Filed under
Software
  • OpenGenus Quark: The World’s First Offline Search Engine To Search Code

    You’re searching a code for your project online and the Internet connection is suddenly dropped. What would you do? Just sitting idle and waiting for the Internet connection to be back? Not necessary! Now, you can search your favorite code written in any language even if there is no Internet connection. Sounds awesome? Indeed! Say hello to “OpenGenus Quark” – the World’s first Offline Search Engine that helps you to search code for any algorithm or data-structure in your favorite language in seconds. Be it a C++ code, or Java or Python, OpenGenus Quark will instantly display a lot of sample codes in a matter of second. OpenGenus community is constantly adding more codes everyday. So if the code you’re looking for is not available, no worries! Just mail them and they will take care of it.

  • StackEdit – An In-Browser Markdown Editor for Professionals

    You might not have heard about PageDown before, but you must have heard about Stack Overflow and its sister sites. Well, PageDown is the Markdown library those services use. And it is also what StackEdit is based on.

    StackEdit is a full-featured modern, open-source Markdown editor and it is what is used by Stack Overflow and all its sibling sites.

  • New Lightworks RC3 Version 14.1 revision 102835 Now Available on Windows Linux and Mac!
  • Lightworks 14.1 Video Editor Steps Closer To Release

    The multi-platform, professional-grade Lightworks non-linear video editing system is getting close to releasing version 14.1.

Software: Cockpit, notmuch, Jumble Password, Tableau and GNOME

Filed under
Software
  • Cockpit 159

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 159.

  • notmuch release 0.26 now available

    Version 0.26 of the notmuch email client/indexer is available with a long list of new features. "It's now possible to include the cleartext of encrypted e-mails in the notmuch index. This makes it possible to search your encrypted e-mails with the same ease as searching cleartext."

  • Jumble Password – Create Unique IDs and Passwords on Linux

    Jumble Password is an electron-based utility app that you can use to create unique password combinations using your date of birth and name. It uses a random number permutation algorithm called the Fisher-Yates Shuffle Algorithm to jumble up sequences.

    A typical case scenario is if you want to create a password for a website project you’re working on. You can choose to enter random names or dates to get unique suggestions each time you hit the submit button.

  • Tableau adds in-memory data engine Hyper to Tableau 10.5, launches Tableau Server for Linux

    Tableau said its in-memory data engine, called Hyper, is generally available and will be included in Tableau 10.5. Hyper will be able to boost query speed by 5X and extract data and large data sets faster.

    With the move, Tableau gets into the database game. Typically, Tableau is extracting data from multiple data sets and joining them together.

    What Tableau is hoping to do is speed up time to insight and visualization. Tableau is also releasing Tableau Server on Linux and the ability to embed multiple visualizations in a single view with Viz in Tooltip.

  • Tableau’s data visualization platform now supports Linux, promises faster operations

    Tableau announced today that its new Hyper data engine is generally available to customers, providing a massive speed boost for existing processes through its business intelligence and analysis software.

  • GXml 0.16.0 Released

    GXml is a library for XML access and GObject serialization to XML, with a W3C DOM4 API implementation.

  • Vala Warnings output Improvements

    As for resent release of Vala 0.39.4, there are huge improvements if we talk about warnings output at Vala code and C code compilation level.

    One of the argument against Vala, has been the number of warnings you get for a valid Vala code at C level compilation. As an example you can check warnings for GXml in March 2017 about 230, some were my fault but other at C level.

Software and Games: TEA Ebook, Akiee, KDE Discover Software Center and More

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • TEA Ebook – A Modern Ebook App for Stylish Readers

    We have reviewed a good number of ebook apps in the past, most of which have been in development for a long time. Today, we bring you a relatively new app to the application market and it goes by the name of TEA Ebook.

    TEA Ebook is a free and cross-platform EPUB and PDF reader with which you can browse and read through your entire digital library wherever you are, and without an internet connection.

  • Akiee – A Markdown-Based Task Manager for Developers

    Akiee is a cross-platform, AGILE-inspired task manager that helps you to concentrate on your most important tasks by making use of ranks instead of priorities.

    It features a simple UI with three main tabs, Todo, Doing, and Done. A "+" button for adding new tasks, an “Editor” button for editing tasks directly, and an “All” button to list all your tasks.

  •  

  • Discover, the KDE Software Center App, is Improving Nicely

    Many KDE fans –maybe even you– consider the app to be too limited, preferring instead to use an alternative tool like Synaptic or the Muon Software Center to handle package management.

    So popular is Muon that Kubuntu 17.10 even re-added it to its install image!

    But Discover shouldn’t be forgotten about.

    It’s important that Plasma desktop has a vibrant, easy to use, “one-stop-shop” for users to discover, install, update and remove software on their desktops.

  •  

  • Polishing Discover Software Center

    KDE Discover Software Center is a key element of our Usability and Productivity initiative because it encompasses the basic experience of discovering, installing, and removing software. Most regular people don’t want to use the command line to do this, and for them, we have Discover.

  • Breaking apart massive bosses in the Breakout-like 'Puppet Kings', some thoughts

    I have fond memories of Breakout as a child, my son even has a rather low quality version on his 'kids camera' and Puppet Kings [Steam] is an interesting take on it.

  • Need to relax? Guppy is a simple game about trying to survive as a fish

    Since releases are always light at the start of a year, I've been able to look over some more titles sent to our Steam Curator. Guppy [Steam, Official Site] is one such game, that sees you become a fish.

Software: BadISO, MusE 3.0.0, Krita, GNOME and More

Filed under
Software
  • Announcing BadISO

    For a few years now I have been working on-and-off on a personal project to import data from a large collection of home-made CD-Rs and DVD-Rs. I've started writing up my notes, experiences and advice for performing a project like this; but they aren't yet in a particularly legible state.

    As part of this work I wrote some software called "BadISO" which takes a possibly-corrupted or incomplete optical disc image (specifically ISO9660) and combined with a GNU ddrescue map (or log) file, tells you which files within the image are intact, and which are not. The idea is you have tried to import a disc using ddrescue and some areas of the disc have not read successfully. The ddrescue map file tells you which areas in byte terms, but not what files that corresponds to. BadISO plugs that gap.

  • MusE 3.0.0 released

    Three years after the last stable release, version 3.0 of the MusE MIDI/Audio sequencer is now available. As you might expect there many changes since the last release including a switch to Qt5, a new Plugin Path editor in Global Settings, a mixer makeover with lots of fixes, a system-wide move to double precision of all audio paths, and much more.

  • Linux Release Roundup: Wine, Soundnode, Etcher + More

    Welcome to our first Linux Release Roundup of 2018 — and as you might expect from the first week of a new year, there’s not an awful lot to round up!

    I like to assume that app developers spent their holidays enjoying themselves rather than beavering away on apps for our collective benefit.

    Even so, here are a couple of recent updates – but warning: this post contains Electron.

  • Interview with Emily K. Mell

    That it’s free! I think it’s remarkable that the open-source community could create something of this quality without a money spigot. Given Adobe’s outrageous pricing scheme for Photoshop, you’d think that software like this couldn’t exist anywhere else. Krita is a much better option.

  • Loving Gitlab.gnome.org, and getting notifications

    I'm loving gitlab.gnome.org. It has been only a couple of weeks since librsvg moved to gitlab, and I've already received and merged two merge requests. (Isn't it a bit weird that Github uses "pull request" and Everyone(tm) knows the PR acronym, but Gitlab uses "merge request"?)

  • 7 Best Alternatives To Microsoft Office Suite — 2018 Edition

    Some people need specific features or compatibility with other contacts, and that’s understandable; it’s expected to come at a price. But what about those who don’t need much out of an office software? The average person, even if technically inclined, doesn’t need much out of a word processor (I mean, it’s not like it’s a text editor or anything). So, should you pay for something that you don’t need? Probably none of my business, so I’ll just give you the facts to make an informed decision and select the best Microsoft Office alternative...

Software: Eddy, KDE, and GNU

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Software
  • Eddy - Easily Install Debian Packages on Elementary

    Eddy is a simple Debian package management GUI tool in Elementary OS that allows installation of Debian packages by dragging and dropping Debian files onto a GUI window. The tool can be installed straight from App Center platform or installed from source. Let's see how we can install from source on Elementary 0.4.1 Loki.

    Installing from AppCenter is the preferred way of installing Eddy since it contains the stable, tested version of the application. Compiling from source provides you with the latest "commit" with the newest functionality that may not be released as a part of an update in AppCenter or in general.

  • Season Of KDE 2018

    It’s been 5 months since I came to GCompris community, but it feels it was a few days back. I came here as a newbie in open source, not even knowing how to ask sensible questions (that’s very important which I learned during my works in GCompris), not even knowing how and where to begin.

    But I deeply thank our awesome community and helpful mentors, Johnny Jazeix, Timothee Giet, Divyam Madaan, Emmanuel Charruau and Rudra Nil Basu who kept guiding me and helped me constantly in my tasks through which I learned a lot of things, which otherwise I could have never got the opportunity to learn.

    [...]

    I will continue to contribute to GCompris for a long time and help our software grow, as much as I can.

  • Beginning 2018

    2017 began with the once-in-a-lifetime trip to India to speak at KDE.Conf.in. That was amazing enough, but the trip to a local village, and visiting the Kaziranga National Park were too amazing for words.

    Literal highlight of last year were the eclipse and trip to see it with my son Thomas, and Christian and Hailey's wedding, and the trip to participate with my daughter Anne, while also spending some time with son Paul, his wife Tara and my grandson Oscar. This summer I was able to spend a few days in Brooklyn with Colin and Rory as well on my way to Akademy. So 2017 was definitely worth living through!

    [...]

    First, I'm so happy that soon Kubuntu will again be distributing 17.10 images next week. Right now we're in testing in preparation for that; pop into IRC if you'd like to help with the testing (#kubuntu-devel). https://kubuntu.org/getkubuntu/ next week!

  • Ten Things I Wish I’d Known About bash

     

    Here I’ve focussed on the things that either confused me or increased my power and productivity in bash significantly, and tried to communicate them (as in my book) in a way that emphasises getting the understanding right.

  • Emacs for Science

        

    I typically cover software packages that do actual calculations to advance scientific knowledge, but here I'm exploring a slightly stranger tool in the arsenal of scientific computation.

    Emacs is a text editor that has almost all the functionality of an operating system. A collection of enhancements and configuration settings are available bundled under the name of scimax. Being an Emacs user myself, I was surprised I'd never heard of it before now. This project has been in development for some time, but it recently has started to find wider attention.

Leftovers: Containers in Research, Opera, KDE Software, Thunderbolt 3, Android and Chrome OS

Filed under
Software
  • Containers in Research

    Last week, I attended the Docker Containers for Reproducible Research Workshop hosted by the Software Sustainability Institute. Many talks were addressing how containers can be used in a high performance computing (HPC) environment. Since running the Docker daemon requires root privileges, most administrators are reluctant to allow users running Docker containers in a HPC environment. This issue as been addressed by Singularity, which is an alternative conterization technology that does not require root privileges. The nice thing is that Singularity allows importing existing Docker images, which allows you creating a Singularity container from anything that is on Docker Hub. Although I only used Docker so far, Singularity sounds like a nice technology I would like to explore in the future.

  • Opera 50 Web Browser Features Cryptocurrency Mining Protection
  • Latte bug fix release v0.7.3 and some news...

    Latte Dock v0.7.3 has been released containing many important fixes and improvements! Soon at your distro repos or...

  • Discussing the future of Cantor

    It is common to use the new year date to start new projects or give new directions for old ones. The last one is the case for Cantor.

    Since when I got the maintainer status for Cantor, I was working to improve the community around the software. Because the great plugins systems of Qt, it is easy to write new backends for Cantor, and in fact in last years Cantor reached the number of 11 backends.

  • Fedora 28 Aiming For Secure Thunderbolt 3 Support

    If Fedora developers are successful, Fedora 28 will feature secure and properly supported Thunderbolt 3 device handling out-of-the-box.

    Long story short, Fedora 28 will hopefully be featuring Red Hat's Bolt project for dealing with modern Thunderbolt devices. With Thunderbolt allowing for direct access to the PCI Express bus, it opens the system up to DMA attacks and other vulnerabilities. But under Thunderbolt 3 is support for security levels by which devices can be restricted to only DisplayPort acess, user authorization of devices, and secure access. The Linux kernel changes for dealing with Thunderbolt 3 is in place but the user-space portion is not.

  • 8 Best Android Launchers To Enhance Looks And Performance Of Your Device in 2018

    Android’s dominance over other mobile operating systems is mainly due to the endless customization opportunities it provides to its user base. Launchers are one of the most customizable parts of Android. Android smartphones are inoperable without a launcher, which comprises of your home screen and the catalog of all the apps available on your device. So every device comes with a default launcher pre-installed.

  • This is the new Acer Chromebook 11

    Many people diss Chromebooks because they simply don't understand them. No, Chrome OS -- the operating system that powers these laptops -- is not just a glorified web browser. Actually, the OS is a full Linux distribution that is both extremely secure and easy to use. True, they can be deficient for some tasks, such as video editing and hardcore gaming, but let's be honest -- not everyone has those needs. If everything you do is in a browser -- email, web surfing, social media, YouTube, Netflix, etc. -- there is no reason to run Windows and open yourself up to malware and other bad things. Hell, Chromebooks even have Microsoft Office support these days!

Software and Games

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • Gammu release day

    I've just released new versions of Gammu, python-gammu and Wammu. These are mostly bugfix releases (see individual changelogs for more details), but they bring back Wammu for Windows.

    This is especially big step for Wammu as the existing Windows binary was almost five years old. The another problem with that was that it was cross-compiled on Linux and it always did not behave correctly. The current binaries are automatically produced on AppVeyor during our continuous integration.

  • Opera 50 Debuts as World's First Web Browser with Anti-Bitcoin Mining Protection

    Opera Software released today the Opera 50 web browser for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows systems, a major release that comes with innovative new features and dozens of improvements.

    Based on Chromium 63.0.3239.108, Opera 50 appears to be the only major web browser that promised to protect your computer against Bitcoin mining. Dubbed NoCoin, the anti-Bitcoin mining protection has been implemented in Opera's integrated ad blocker, which can be easily enabled in Settings under the Recommended lists of ad filters of the Block ads option.

  • Critical Annihilation is an explosion-heavy and stupidly fun twin-stick shooter

    Critical Annihilation is a twin-stick shooter where every single thing is made out of tiny blocks, it also happens to be an incredibly satisfying experience.

  • Babe Music Player Is Getting a Mobile-Friendly Qml Port

    It’s been almost a year since I publicly stood in front of you all to coo over the Qt-based Babe music player — and now I’m back to coo at it some more.

    You can blame Babe developer Camilo Higuita. He’s shared a new video of his app that has me excited. The clip, which is embedded above, demos the ‘initial work’ he’s made on a Qml port of the Babe that uses Kirgami.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

GNOME: GNOME Shell, Bug Tracking, GXml

  • How to Install GNOME Shell Extensions GUI / CLI
    GNOME Shell extensions are small and lightweight pieces of codes that enhance GNOME desktop’s functionality and improves the user experience. They are the equivalent of add-ons in your browser. For instance, you can have add-ons that download videos like IDM downloader or block annoying ads such as Adblocker. Similarly, GNOME extensions perform certain tasks e.g. Display weather and geolocation. One of the tools used to install and customize GNOME Shell extensions is the GNOME tweak tool. It comes pre-installed in the latest Linux distributions. This article we cover how to install GNOME Shell extensions from GUI and from the command line on various Linux distros.
  • Musings on bug trackers
    I love bugzilla, I really do. I’ve used it nearly my entire career in free software. I know it well, I like the command line tool integration. But I’ve never had a day in bugzilla where I managed to resolve/triage/close nearly 100 issues. I managed to do that today with our gitlab instance and I didn’t even mean to.
  • ABI stability for GXml
    I’m taking a deep travel across Vala code; trying to figure out how things work. With my resent work on abstract methods for compact classes, may I have an idea on how to provide ABI stability to GXml. GXml have lot of interfaces for DOM4, implemented in classes, like Gom* series. But they are a lot, so go for each and add annotations, like Gee did, to improve ABI, is a hard work.

More on Barcelona Moving to Free Software

  • Barcelona Aims To Oust Microsoft In Open Source Drive
    The city of Barcelona has embarked on an ambitious open source effort aimed at reducing its dependence on large proprietary software vendors such as Microsoft, including the replacement of both applications and operating systems.
  • Barcelona to ditch Microsoft software for open source software
    Barcelona, one of the most popular cities in the Europe is now switching to open-source software by replacing Microsoft Windows, Office and Exchange with Linux, Libre Office and Open Xchange respectively. The city council is already piloting the use of Ubuntu Linux desktops along with Mozilla Firefox as the default browser. With this move, Barcelona city is planning to save money over the years by reducing software/service licensing fees. They are also planning to hire new developers to write open-source software. The open-source product will also be made available to other Spanish municipalities and public bodies further afield allowing them the opportunity to save money on software licences.
  • Barcelona to ditch Microsoft in favour of open source Linux software
    Catalan capital Barcelona is planning to ditch proprietary software products from Microsoft in favour of free, open source alternatives such as Open-Xchange email. That’s according to a report by Spain's national paper El Pais, which reports that Barcelona plans to invest 70% of its annual software budget in open source this year.

OSS Leftovers

  • Open Source turns 20
    While open source software is ubiquitous, recognized across industries as a fundamental infrastructure component as well as a critical factor for driving innovation, the "open source" label was coined only 20 years ago. The concept of open source software - as opposed to free software or freeware - is credited to Netscape which, in January 1998, announced plans to release the source code of its proprietary browser, Navigator, under a license that would freely permit modification and redistribution. This code is today the basis for Mozilla Firefox and Thunderbird. The Open Source Initiative (OSI) regards that event as the point at which "software freedom extended its reach beyond the enthusiast community and began its ascent into the mainstream".
  • Coreboot 4.7 Released With 47 More Motherboards Supported, AMD Stoney Ridge
    Coreboot 4.7 is now available as the latest release of this free and open-source BIOS/UEFI replacement. Coreboot 4.7 is the latest tagged release for this project developed via Git. This release has initial support for AMD Stoney Ridge platforms, Intel ICH10 Southbridge support, Intel Denverton/Denverton-NS platform support, and initial work on supporting next-gen Intel Cannonlake platforms.
  • Thank you CUSEC!
    Last week, I spoke at CUSEC (Canadian Undergraduate Software Engineering Conference) in Montreal.   I really enjoy speaking with students and learning what they are working on.  They are the future of our industry!  I was so impressed by the level of organization and the kindness and thoughtfulness of the CUSEC organizing committee who were all students from various universities across Canada. I hope that you all are enjoying some much needed rest after your tremendous work in the months approaching the conference and last week.
  • Percona Announces Sneak Peek of Conference Breakout Sessions for Seventh Annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference
  • The Universal Donor
    A few people reacted negatively to my article on why Public Domain software is broadly unsuitable for inclusion in a community open source project. Most argued that because public domain gave them the rights they need where they live (mostly the USA), I should not say it was wrong to use it. That demonstrates either parochialism or a misunderstanding of what public domain really means. It should not be used for the same reason code known to be subject to software patents should not be used — namely that only code that, to the best efforts possible, can be used by anyone, anywhere without the need to ask permission (e.g. by buying a patent license) or check it it’s needed (e.g. is that PD code PD here?) can be used in an open source project. Public domain fails the test for multiple reasons: global differences in copyright term, copyright as an unalienable moral rather than as a property right, and more. Yes, public domain may give you the rights you need. But in an open source project, it’s not enough for you to determine you personally have the rights you need. In order to function, every user and contributor of the project needs prior confidence they can use, improve and share the code, regardless of their location or the use to which they put it. That confidence also has to extend to their colleagues, customers and community as well.

Ubuntu: Ubuntu Core, Ubuntu Free Culture Showcase for 18.04, Lubuntu 17.04 EoL

  • Ubuntu Core: A secure open source OS for IoT
    Canonical's Ubuntu Core, a tiny, transactional version of the Ubuntu Linux OS for IoT devices, runs highly secure Linux application packages, known as "snaps," that can be upgraded remotely.
  • Introducing the Ubuntu Free Culture Showcase for 18.04
    Ubuntu’s changed a lot in the last year, and everything is leading up to a really exciting event: the release of 18.04 LTS! This next version of Ubuntu will once again offer a stable foundation for countless humans who use computers for work, play, art, relaxation, and creation. Among the various visual refreshes of Ubuntu, it’s also time to go to the community and ask for the best wallpapers. And it’s also time to look for a new video and music file that will be waiting for Ubuntu users on the install media’s Examples folder, to reassure them that their video and sound drivers are quite operational. Long-term support releases like Ubuntu 18.04 LTS are very important, because they are downloaded and installed ten times more often than every single interim release combined. That means that the wallpapers, video, and music that are shipped will be seen ten times more than in other releases. So artists, select your best works. Ubuntu enthusiasts, spread the word about the contest as far and wide as you can. Everyone can help make this next LTS version of Ubuntu an amazing success.
  • Lubuntu 17.04 has reached End of Life
    The Lubuntu Team announces that as a non-LTS release, 17.04 has a 9-month support cycle and, as such, reached end of life on Saturday, January 13, 2018. Lubuntu will no longer provide bug fixes or security updates for 17.04, and we strongly recommend that you update to 17.10, which continues to be actively supported with security updates and select high-impact bug fixes.