Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Software

Software: 14 Excellent Free Plotting Tools and Texinfo 6.6

Filed under
Software
  • 14 Excellent Free Plotting Tools

    A plotting tool is computer software which helps to analyze and visualize data, often of a scientific nature. Using this type of software, users can generate plots of functions, data and data fits. Software of this nature typically includes additional functionality, such as data analysis functions including curve fitting.

    A good plotting tool is very important for generating professional looking graphics for inclusion in academic papers. However, plotting tools are not just useful for academics, engineers, and scientists. Many users will need to plot graphs for other purposes such as presentations.

    Fortunately, Linux is well endowed with plotting software. There are some heavyweight commercial Linux applications which include plotting functionality. These include MATLAB, Maple, and Mathematica. Without access to their source code, you have limited understanding of how the software functions, and how to change it. The license costs are also very expensive. And we are fervent advocates of open source software. The purpose of this article is to help promote open source plotting tools that are available.

    To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of 14 excellent plotting tools. Many of the applications are very mature. For example, gnuplot has been in development since the mid-1980s.

    The choice of plotting software may depend on which programming language you prefer. For example, if your leaning towards Python, matplotlib is an ideal candidate as it’s written in, and designed specifically for Python. Whereas, if you’re keen on the R programming language, you’ll probably prefer ggplot2, which is one of the most popular R packages. With good reason, it offers a powerful model of graphics that removes a lot of the difficulty in making complex multi-players graphics. R does come with “base graphics” which are the traditional plotting functions distributed with R. But gpplot2 takes graphics to the next level.

  •  

  • [GNU] Texinfo 6.6 released

    We have released version 6.6 of Texinfo, the GNU documentation format.

Geary 0.13.0

Filed under
Software
GNOME
  • Geary 0.13.0 released!

    Geary 0.13.0 has been released.

  • GNOME's Geary 0.13 Is A Big Step Forward For This Linux Mail Client

    Geary 0.13 is out today as a big step-up for this GNOME e-mail client for the Linux desktop.

    The Geary 0.13 release features a new UI for creating/managing email accounts, there is finally integration with GNOME Online Accounts, improvements for displaying conversations, better UI/UX work around composing new messages, various bug fixes, security fixes, and other enhancements.

  • Geary 0.13.0 released

    This is a major new release, featuring a number of new features —
    including a new user interface for creating and managing email
    accounts, integration with GNOME Online Accounts (which also provides
    OAuth login support for some services), improvements in displaying
    conversations, composing new messages, interacting with other email
    apps, reporting problems as they occur, and number of important bug
    fixes, server compatibility fixes, and security fixes.

    This latest version is now available for installation from Flathub. See
    the Geary web site for installation details and other installation
    options: https://wiki.gnome.org/Apps/Geary

    Note to maintainers: This version now uses meson for a build system and
    has a number of updated dependencies. Please see meson.build for
    details.

FinalCrypt – An Open Source File Encryption Application

Filed under
Software

FnalCrypt is a free and open source encryption tool that allows you to encrypt files with a key. It is available for Linux, Windows and macOS.
Read more

Tales of colours: GIMP and Latte Dock (KDE)

Filed under
GNU
KDE
Software
  • Colorization in GIMP

    As part of the Image team at GREYC lab (CRNS, ENSICAEN, University of Caen), I implemented the “fill by line art” algorithm in GIMP, also known as “Smart Colorization“. You may know this algorithm in G’Mic (developed by the same team), so when they proposed me to work with them, I wanted to implement this algorithm in GIMP core. Thus it became my first assignment.

  • Latte and a Colors tale...

    A few months ago while I was scratching Latte Dock limits an idea came and haunted my thoughts. How Latte could give the colors freedom for panels and windows that an Android phone already provides? Questions like this arose and solutions appeared suddenly in many different places, but an important and concrete dream prevail in the end.

4 Excellent Command-line FTP clients

Filed under
Software

The desktop environment with its bundle of programs sharing a common graphical user interface (GUI) remains a firm favorite with users. Not surprising really given that a good desktop environment makes computing fun and simple. The graphical desktop environment has become so ingrained in almost everyone’s computer activities that it might seem the command line will wither away. Yet, there is still an important role to play for the powerful command-line interface (CLI).

Read more

Also: FinalCrypt – An Open Source File Encryption Application

Compiz 0.9.14.0 released

Filed under
Software

Compiz 0.9.14.0 has been officially released today.

Major changes in this release include:

- Development has switched from Bazaar (back) to Git [1].
- CCSM has been ported to PyGObject, GTK 3 and Python 3.
- compizconfig-python has been ported from Pyrex to Cython.
- Restored the Color Filter plugin by porting it to the new plugin API.
- Added support for loading configuration from multiple files.
- Docks and splashscreens now appear focused.
- Fixed build errors with GCC 8.
- Removed KDE (4.x) support code.
- Compiz now needs cmake ≥ 3.10.0 and pkg-config ≥ 0.29.1 to build.
- gtk-window-decorator now needs libmetacity ≥ 3.22.0 to build.

Also, some bugs have been fixed. See NEWS [2] for a list of them.

The tarball for the new release can be downloaded at [3].
Please report any bugs you have found to our bug tracker [4].

I would like to thank Alberts Muktupāvels, Marco Trevisan, Auboyneau Vincent,
Samuel Thibault, Colomban Wendling, Eleni Maria Stea and other people who have
contributed to this release.

Read more

Also: Compiz 0.9.14 Released As First Update In Over Two Years

10 Cool Software to Try from CORP Repo in Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
Software

In this article, we will share 10 cool software projects to try in Fedora distribution. All the apps or tools covered here can be found in COPR repository. However, before we move any further, let’s briefly explain COPR.

Read more

Software: Pitivi, PackageKit, 23 Electron Applications You Should Know About and More

Filed under
Software
  • Polishing Pitivi's viewer

    In the Pitivi video editor, the viewer is quite important, as it shows the video. Our viewer also shows a discreet frame around a clip selected in the timeline, making it easy to resize and position the video of the clip by dragging. Below is the story of the viewer updates in the past year.

    [...]

    Normally the viewer is used to display the project video at the playhead position, but we also use it to display the start or end margins of a clip when it is being trimmed.

    [...]

    Pitivi benefits from the GStreamer multimedia framework used on most Linux desktops and we contribute back in multiple ways. We could use some more hands on Pitivi. Contributions of any type would be greatly appreciated. Come chat with us. If you're a student, you can join us doing a GSoC internship this summer!

  • PackageKit is dead, long live, well, something else

    It’s probably no surprise to many of you that PackageKit has been in maintenance mode for quite some time. Although started over ten years ago (!) it’s not really had active maintenance since about 2014. Of course, I’ve still been merging PRs and have been slinging tarballs over the wall every few months, but nothing new was happening with the project, and I’ve worked on many other things since.

    I think it’s useful for a little retrospective. PackageKit was conceived as an abstraction layer over about a dozen different package management frameworks. Initially it succeeded, with a lot of front ends UIs being written for the PackageKit API, making the Linux desktop a much nicer place for many years. Over the years, most package managers have withered and died, and for the desktop at least really only two remain, .rpm and .deb. The former being handled by the dnf PackageKit backend, and the latter by aptcc.

  • How to watch for releases of upstream projects

    Do you want to know when a new version of your favorite project is released? Do you want to make your job as packager easier? If so, this article is for you. It introduces you to the world of release-monitoring.org. You’ll see how it can help you catch up with upstream releases.

  • 23 Electron Applications You Should Know About

    Here we present the best Electron applications available for Linux desktops, including Ubuntu, as well as macOS and Windows too.

    We’ve written about a lot of diverse Electron apps over the past few years, ranging from desktop podcast clients to popular IDEs.

    Not everyone appreciates Electron’s cross-platform versatility as much as we do. Heck, I once wrote an opinion piece explaining why Electron apps aren’t evil. Some have issues with the amount of memory Electron apps use up, the CPU cycles they eat up, and the disk size they take up.

    But there are those who don’t mind using the odd Electron app here or there, to plug a gap. So I figured a roundup spotlighting some to the very best Electron applications available for Linux (and other OSes) could still be of interest.

  • 10 Benefits of Publishing Your App in the Snap Store [Video]

    Canonical's Alan Pope lists 10 benefits of publishing apps in the Snap store. His talk was recorded at the FOSDEM Linux conference in Belgium.

Wine 4.2 Released

Filed under
Software
  • Wine Announcement

    The Wine development release 4.2 is now available.

  • Wine 4.2 Released With Unicode String Normalization & ECC Crypto Key Support

    The second bi-weekly development release following last month's stable debut of Wine 4.0 is now available for testing.

    Wine 4.2 was just release and adds Unicode string normalization support, support for ECC cryptographic keys, support for mixing 32/64-bit DLLs in the load path, futex-based implementations of more synchronization primitives, and the usual smothering of bug fixes.

8 Best Free Linux Food and Drink Software

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Richard Stallman, an American software freedom activist, has profound views on what freedoms should be provided in software. He strongly believes that free software should be regarded in the same way as free speech and not free beer. Rest assured, this article is not going to become embroiled in an ideological debate, but instead focuses on a subject which really is essential for life itself.

The necessary requirements for life are physical conditions which can sustain life, nutrients and energy source, and water. This article relates to the last two requirements. Linux software can play a key part in helping to improve our health and quality of life. If you want to stay fit, part of the solution is to ensure that you are eating the right types of food in the right quantity. Nutrition analysis is important to ensure that you have a healthy balanced diet containing a variety of foods including fruit, vegetables and lots of starchy foods.

This article is not just limited to software that ensures you maintain a healthy diet. We also feature the best free Linux software for helping people to cook delicious food. Although this software will not help you turn into Gordon Ramsay, Paul Bocuse, or Bobby Flay, it will open new doors in the world of cooking. Rest assured, we have not forgotten beer lovers, as we also identify the finest beer software available.

To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of 6 high quality food and drink software. Hopefully there will be something of interest for anyone interested in keeping fit, making beer, or the art of cooking.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

Software: 14 Excellent Free Plotting Tools and Texinfo 6.6

  • 14 Excellent Free Plotting Tools
    A plotting tool is computer software which helps to analyze and visualize data, often of a scientific nature. Using this type of software, users can generate plots of functions, data and data fits. Software of this nature typically includes additional functionality, such as data analysis functions including curve fitting. A good plotting tool is very important for generating professional looking graphics for inclusion in academic papers. However, plotting tools are not just useful for academics, engineers, and scientists. Many users will need to plot graphs for other purposes such as presentations. Fortunately, Linux is well endowed with plotting software. There are some heavyweight commercial Linux applications which include plotting functionality. These include MATLAB, Maple, and Mathematica. Without access to their source code, you have limited understanding of how the software functions, and how to change it. The license costs are also very expensive. And we are fervent advocates of open source software. The purpose of this article is to help promote open source plotting tools that are available. To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of 14 excellent plotting tools. Many of the applications are very mature. For example, gnuplot has been in development since the mid-1980s. The choice of plotting software may depend on which programming language you prefer. For example, if your leaning towards Python, matplotlib is an ideal candidate as it’s written in, and designed specifically for Python. Whereas, if you’re keen on the R programming language, you’ll probably prefer ggplot2, which is one of the most popular R packages. With good reason, it offers a powerful model of graphics that removes a lot of the difficulty in making complex multi-players graphics. R does come with “base graphics” which are the traditional plotting functions distributed with R. But gpplot2 takes graphics to the next level.
  •  
  • [GNU] Texinfo 6.6 released
    We have released version 6.6 of Texinfo, the GNU documentation format.

Bare-Metal Kubernetes Servers and SUSE Servers

  • The Rise of Bare-Metal Kubernetes Servers
    While most instances of Kubernetes today are deployed on virtual machines running in the cloud or on-premises, there is a growing number of instances of Kubernetes being deployed on bare-metal servers. The two primary reasons for opting to deploy Kubernetes on a bare- metal server over a virtual machine usually are performance and reliance on hardware accelerators. In the first instance, an application deployed at the network edge might be too latency-sensitive to tolerate the overhead created by a virtual machine. AT&T, for example, is working with Mirantis to deploy Kubernetes on bare-metal servers to drive 5G wireless networking services.
  • If companies can run SAP on Linux, they can run any application on it: Ronald de Jong
    "We have had multiple situations with respect to security breaches in the last couple of years, albeit all the open source companies worked together to address the instances. As the source code is freely available even if something goes wrong, SUSE work closely with open source software vendors to mitigate the risk", Ronald de Jong, President of -Sales, SUSE said in an interview with ET CIO.
  • SUSE Public Cloud Image Life-cycle
    It has been a while since we published the original image life-cycle guidelines SUSE Image Life Cycle for Public Cloud Deployments. Much has been learned since, technology has progressed, and the life-cycle of products has changed. Therefore, it is time to refresh things, update our guidance, and clarify items that have led to questions over the years. This new document serves as the guideline going forward starting February 15th, 2019 and supersedes the original guideline. Any images with a date stamp later than v20190215 fall under the new guideline. The same basic principal as in the original guideline applies, the image life-cycle is aligned with the product life-cycle of the product in the image. Meaning a SLES image generally aligns with the SUSE Linux Enterprise Server life-cycle and a SUSE Manager image generally aligns with the SUSE Manager life-cycle.

Steam's Slipping Grip and Release of Wine-Staging 4.2

  • Steam's iron grip on PC gaming is probably over even if the Epic Games Store fails
     

    It doesn’t matter though. Whether Epic succeeds or not, Steam has already lost. The days of Valve’s de facto monopoly are over, and all that matters is what comes next.

  • Wine-Staging 4.2 Released - Now Less Than 800 Patches Atop Upstream Wine
    Wine 4.2 debuted on Friday and now the latest Wine-Staging release is available that continues carrying hundreds of extra patches re-based atop upstream Wine to provide various experimental/testing fixes and other feature additions not yet ready for mainline Wine.  Wine-Staging for a while has been carrying above 800 patches and at times even above 900, but with Wine-Staging 4.2 they have now managed to strike below the 800 patch level. It's not that they are dropping patches, but a lot of the Wine-Staging work has now been deemed ready for mainline and thus merged to the upstream code-base. A number of patches around the Windows Codecs, NTDLL, BCrypt, WineD3D, and other patches have been mainlined thus now coming in at a 798 patch delta.