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Software

NetworkManager 1.18 Released With Policy Routing Rules, VLAN Filtering For Linux Bridge

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Software

NetworkManager 1.16 was released in March with WireGuard support, WiFi P2P, Intel IWD improvements, and much more. Surprisingly being released already is NetworkManager 1.18.

With just one month having passed since NetworkManager 1.16, the NetworkManager 1.18 release is quite small and with just a few changes. Namely it includes the few changes from NetworkManager 1.17.2 already covered on Phoronix and a few more.

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Strawberry: A Fork of Clementine Music Player

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Software

In this age of streaming music and cloud services, there are still people who need an application to collect and play their music. If you are such a person, this article should interest you.

We have earlier covered Sayonara music player. Today, we will be taking a look at the Strawberry Music Player.

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Kdenlive 19.04 released

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KDE
Software
Movies

We are happy and proud to announce the release of Kdenlive 19.04 refactored edition concluding a 3 year cycle in which more than 60% of the code base was changed with +144,000 lines of code added and +74,000 lines of code removed. This is our biggest release ever bringing new features, improved stability, greater speed and last but not least maintainability (making it easier to fix bugs and add new features).

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KMyMoney 5.0.4 released

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KDE
Software

It took us a while, and now it is ready: KMyMoney 5.0.4 comes with updated documentation. As usual, problems have been reported by our users and the development team worked hard to fix them in the meantime. Besides that, one or the other long standing bug has been fixed. The result of this effort is the brand new KMyMoney 5.0.4 release.

Despite even more testing we understand that some bugs may have slipped past our best efforts. If you find one of them, please forgive us, and be sure to report it, either to the mailing list or on bugs.kde.org.

From here, we will continue to fix reported bugs, and working to add many requested additions and enhancements, as well as further improving performance.

Please feel free to visit our overview page of the CI builds at https://kmymoney.org/build.php and maybe try out the lastest and greatest by using a daily crafted AppImage version build from the stable branch.

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Also: Color Picker Snap For Linux

11 Great Free Linux Foreign Language Tools

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Software

Learning a new language can provide life changing opportunities and enjoyment. There are so many reasons to learn a foreign language whatever your nationality, to improve employment potential, intellectual curiosity, make travel more enjoyable, sharpen cognitive and life skills, make lifelong friends, and many more. While it is widely acknowledged that it is easier to begin learning a second language at a tender age, starting a new language at any age is eminently worthwhile.

There’s a good selection of traditional materials and tools available to assist with language studies, such as language courses, grammar books, dictionaries, phrasebooks, and electronic translators. However, there are real benefits in using the latest technology to quicken the pace of learning. Online lessons and computer software are two popular ways of immersing yourself in learning a foreign language. They are the best alternative to actually staying in a country where the language is spoken by the general population.

There is an extensive amount of open source computer software to help individuals learn a foreign language. We have identified the best of breed open source Linux software to make language acquisition fun, enjoyable, and a stimulating way of learning. These applications offer the opportunity to radically improve your life.

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Software: Chats, LogRunners, Containers and Chrome 74

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Software
  • 6 Top open source team chat software for self hosted environment

    Verbal communication is in society since the inception of the period when humans found a way to express feelings in words/sound. This communication wasn’t only limited verbal mode it latter came on paper and then on computers. The value of good communication has its own significant place not only professional but in personal life too. However, here we only talk about professional.

    Now, the enterprises or business are not confined to only small space or tract, they are spreading their arms and legs in multiple directions to achieve targeted growth. In such a scenario, the chatting among company’s employees working on some particular project is either on email or some public chatting applications. But from the perspective of security and exchange of sensitive over a public chatting platform such as WhatsApp would not be a wised idea.

    The office team chat software should be in the control of businesses or teams using them for some project. Where they can add different features into as they required, such kind of needs can be fulfilled by the open source collaboration group chat platforms without the interface of any third party. However, while implementing self-hosted open source team chat servers or applications for the team make sure that they are behind a firewall for enhanced security.

  • Scalyr Launches Open Source Community LogRunners for All Things Observability

    Log monitoring company Scalyr this week launched an open community, deemed LogRunners, for individuals in the observability space. The community is designed to help developers, architects, site reliability engineers, and DevOps and CloudOps professionals identify, solve, and prevent challenges in this market.

    While observability has quite a few definitions, it broadly refers to capabilities — such as logs, metrics, and traces — that help with testing, understanding, and debugging systems and architectures. For LogRunners this will also include Kubernetes, distributed tracing, and logging.

  • Klusterkit: Three open source Kubernetes tools for on-prem, air-gapped environments

    Kubernetes and open source go together hand in hand with Platform9’s new announcement: three new open source Kubernetes tools simplify cluster orchestration and deployment. Each of these tools can be used independently or together, on air-gapped environments and on-premises deployment.

  • Platform9 Open-sources Klusterkit to Simplify the Deployment and Operations of Production-grade Kubernetes Clusters on On-premises, Air-gapped Environments
  • Platform9 open sources Klusterkit to simplify the deployment and operations of Kubernetes clusters

    Today, Platform9 open sourced Klusterkit under the Apache 2.0 license. It is a set of three open source tools that can be used separately or in tandem to simplify the creation and management of highly-available, multi-master, production-grade Kubernetes clusters on-premise, air-gapped environments.

  • 12 open-source tools that make Docker better

    Blink and you might miss some of the most interesting developments around Docker these days. Kubernetes may be getting more of the hot-new-tool thunder, but Docker continues to offer “just enough” container orchestration for most development projects and deployments.

    Plus Docker has its own rich ecosystem of third-party tools that extend Docker, jazz it up, or make it less persnickety. Here are 12 open-source creations that get a boost from Docker or give Docker a boost, leveraging Docker for specific use cases or making Docker easier to work with.

  • What’s New in Chrome 74, Arriving April 23

    The stable version of Chrome 74 is set to land on April 23rd. It will include a dark mode on Windows, Incognito detection blocking, support for media keys in PiP, various Chrome OS improvements, and a lot more.

    It’s worth noting that while these are all planned features in Chrome 74, there’s always the chance they don’t end up making it into the final release and get pushed to 75 (or beyond). Still, we do expect to see at least most of this stuff in 74, even if still behind a flag.

Software: Librarians, Weblate, DocBook and Firefox

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Software
  • Tools to Empower Librarians

    Open source software is a popular choice for libraries and librarians, not simply because recent austerity measures in many developed countries have tightened available budgets. The ability to customise the software for a library’s particular needs, the potential for interoperation with other software, and the lack of license restrictions makes open source software attractive.

    Modern libraries need robust, scalable and flexible software to make their collections and services attractive, especially as digital libraries are radically transforming how information is disseminated. There are very few barriers to any library adopting an open source library system.

    To provide an insight into the quality of software available, we have compiled a list of 7 tools that help librarians embrace web technology. The software is a fairly eclectic bunch, so hopefully there will be something of interest for any librarian.

  • Weblate 3.6

    Weblate 3.6 has been released today. It brings rewritten notifications, user data download and several other improvements. It also sets depreciation timeline for Python 2 installations - after April 2020 Weblate will only support Python 3.

  • docbook2mdoc-1.0.0 released

     

    After doing active development on it for about a month, i just released version 1.0.0 of the DocBook to mdoc converter, docbook2mdoc(1). The OpenBSD port was updated, too. In a nutshell, docbook2mdoc was brought from experimental status to an early release that can be considered mostly usable for production, though no doubt there are still many rough edges. That's why i called it 1.0.0 and not 1.1.1.

    Lots of features were added including support for many new DocBook XML elements and for two kinds of file inclusion, formatting was improved in many respects, and several reorganizations were done with respect to internal code structure. The expat library is no longer needed, and no other dependency is required.
     

    See its homepage for all information about the utility and the release notes for details about this release.
     

    Thanks to Stephen Gregoratto for a number of patches and many useful reports.
     

    The rest of this article explains some important design and implementation decisions and mentions some use cases.

  • Firefox Nightly: These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 57
  • My 20 years of web

    Twenty years ago I resigned from my former job at a financial news wire to pursue a career in San Francisco.  We were transitioning our news service (Jiji Press, a Japanese wire service similar to Reuters) to being a web-based news site.  I had followed the rise and fall of Netscape and the Department of Justice anti-trust case on Microsoft's bundling of IE with Windows.  But what clinched it for me was a Congressional testimony of the Federal Reserve Chairman (the US central bank) about his inability to forecast the potential growth of the Internet.

    Working in the Japanese press at the time gave me a keen interest in international trade.  Prime Minister Hashimoto negotiated with United States Trade Representative Mickey Cantor to enhance trade relations and reduce protectionist tariffs that the countries used to artificially subsidize domestic industries.  Japan was the second largest global economy at the time.  I realized that if I was going to play a role in international trade it was probably going to be in Japan or on the west coast of the US.
     I decided that because Silicon Valley was the location where much of the industry growth in internet technology was happening, that I had to relocate there if I wanted to engage in this industry.  So I packed up all my belongings and moved to San Francisco to start my new career.

Software: LibreOffice, X-Gimp, COPR and Tauon Music Box

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Software
  • [LibreOffice] menubar updates [updated]
  • X-Gimp 2.10.10 [rev25]

    Image editors are ten-a-penny nowadays, so anything which wants attention from a divided audience needs to offer something quite special. X-Gimp is the portable version of GIMP (or the GNU Image Manipulation Program), which is one of the most powerful free image editors available and is frequently described as being a free alternative to the likes of Photoshop.
    This is a highly versatile tool which can be used as a basic drawing program but can also be employed to edit digital photographs to a professional level. Despite being free of charge, opting to use GIMP does not mean having to compromise on features. Layers, masks, channels, filters and special effects, in addition to the usual range of editing tools, are all on hand to make image editing as easy as possible.
    Powerful tools such as the correction mode which allows for the correction of barrel distortion and perspective problems are usually only found in expensive packages but are included here for anyone to try out. Whether you are an amateur digital photographer or a professional graphic artist, GIMP has something to offer you.

  • Fedora Magazine: 4 cool new projects to try in COPR for April 2019

    COPR is a collection of personal repositories for software that isn’t carried in Fedora. Some software doesn’t conform to standards that allow easy packaging. Or it may not meet other Fedora standards, despite being free and open source. COPR can offer these projects outside the Fedora set of packages. Software in COPR isn’t supported by Fedora infrastructure or signed by the project. However, it can be a neat way to try new or experimental software.

    Here’s a set of new and interesting projects in COPR.

  • Tauon Music Box – Excellent desktop music player

    Over the past few months I’ve covered scores of open source graphical music players. They’ve been a mixed bag. Some are genuinely excellent, others falling short of my (fairly) modest requirements. The music players I’ve mostly reviewed include ncmpy, ncmpc, and Cantata. I’ve also reviewed Nulloy, Museeks, Pragha Music Player, Yarock, qoob, aux.app, MellowPlayer, Kaku, Strawberry, Headset, Qmmp, and the truly sublime musikcube. The vast majority of the music players are GUI software.

    Continuing my series, here’s a further graphical music player. Bearing the moniker Tauon Music Box (Tauon), it’s based around disposable playlists and the assumption that folders are albums. They are also intended to function as a kind of workspace or to keep different music collections separate.

    The project instructs users to ensure they have an organized and structured music library, ideally with each album in its own folder. Sound advice.

    The software is written in the Python programming language. It uses Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA), not PulseAudio.

Kdenlive Video Editor 19.04 Arrives with Major Changes in Tow

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KDE
Software
Movies

A major update to the Kdenlive video editor is now available for download.

Kdenlive 19.04 ships as part of KDE Applications 19.04, released on April 19.

This is the vaunted “refactoring” release we’ve written lots about, as the release announcement explains further:

“Kdenlive has gone through an extensive re-write of its core code as more than 60% of its internals has changed, improving its overall architecture.”

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9 Essential Linux Classroom Tools

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GNU
Linux
Software

Educators face a constant variety of challenges that can impact classroom management and the learning process. An inattentive audience, mobile phone texting, disruption by unruly students, absenteeism, time constraints, students forced to take a course they would rather have avoided, and regular changes to the curriculum are just a few examples of the difficulties faced by teachers. Fortunately, there are many different ways for those involved in education, whether in teaching, training, or leadership, to help to improve student’s learning in the classroom, and overcome the obstacles that are encountered.

Information and communications technology (ICT) plays an important role in the planning, delivery, assessment and recording of classroom lessons. The software featured in this software offers indispensable ways to help manage a computer-based classroom, and provide the freedom to offer an exciting, creative, and challenging environment.

With this software, educators can create, administer, and grade tests, help manage a computer-based classroom, create an interactive whiteboard, and produce modular courses. All of the software featured in this article is released under a freely distributable license and can be downloaded without charge. With even tighter constraints facing the public sector, cost is an important consideration for any ICT solution.

To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of 9 of the finest classroom tools covering a wide variety of different ways to effectively integrate ICT into the classroom. Here’s our verdict.

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Also: Linux survival guide: These 21 applications let you move easily between Linux and Windows

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: VoxelJS, AiC and Mozilla B-Team

  • Mozilla VR Blog: VoxelJS: Chunking Magic
    A couple of weeks ago I relaunched VoxelJS with modern ThreeJS and modules support. Today I'm going to talk a little bit about how VoxelJS works internally, specifically how voxels are represented and drawn. This is the key magic part of a voxel engine and I owe a tremendous debt to Max Ogden, James Halliday and Mikola Lysenko Voxels are represented by numbers in a large three dimensional array. Each number says what type of block goes in that block slot, with 0 representing empty. The challenge is how to represent a potentially infinite set of voxels without slowing the computer to a crawl. The only way to do this is to load just a portion of the world at a time.
  • AiC: Collaborative summary documents
    One of my goals was that we could, at least for a moment, disconnect people from their particular position and turn their attention towards the goal of achieving a shared and complete summary. I didn’t feel that we were very succesful in this goal. For one thing, most participants simply left comments on parts they disagreed with; they didn’t themselves suggest alternate wording. That meant that I personally had to take their complaint and try to find some “middle ground” that accommodated the concern but preserved the original point. This was stressful for me and a lot of work. More importantly, it meant that most people continued to interact with the document as advocates for their point-of-view, rather than trying to step back and advocate for the completeness of the summary. In other words: when you see a sentence you disagree with, it is easy to say that you disagree with it. It is much harder to rephrase it in a way that you do agree with – but which still preserves (what you believe to be) the original intent. Doing so requires you to think about what the other person likely meant, and how you can preserve that. However, one possible reason that people may have been reluctant to offer suggestions is that, often, it was hard to make “small edits” that addressed people’s concerns. Especially early on, I found that, in order to address some comment, I would have to make larger restructurings. For example, taking a small sentence and expanding it to a bullet point of its own. Finally, some people who were active on the thread didn’t participate in the doc. Or, if they did, they did so by leaving comments on the original GitHub thread. This is not surprising: I was asking people to do something new and unfamiliar. Also, this whole process played out relatively quickly, and I suspect some people just didn’t even see the document before it was done. If I were to do this again, I would want to start it earlier in the process. I would also want to consider synchronous meetings, where we could go try to process edits as a group (but I think it would take some thought to figure out how to run such a meeting). In terms of functioning asynchronously, I would probably change to use a Google Doc instead of a Dropbox Paper. Google Docs have a better workflow for suggesting edits, I believe, as well, as a richer permissions model. Finally, I would try to draw a harder line in trying to get people to “own” the document and suggest edits of their own. I think the challenge of trying to neutrally represent someone else’s point of view is pretty powerful.
  • Mozilla B-Team: happy bmo push day!
    Bugfixes + enabling the new security feature for API keys.

Programming Leftovers

Devices: Radiant Software, ASRock and Microsoft

  • Radiant 1.1 Lattice FPGA Design Tools Release Accelerates Design Reuse
    In addition to supporting Windows, Radiant Software 1.1 adds support for the popular Ubuntu LTS 16.4 distribution of Linux. Radiant Software 1.1 is now available for download from Lattices website and currently can be used with a free license.
  • ASRock spins Whiskey Lake-U in thin Mini-ITX, 3.5-inch, and NUC formats
    ASRock announced four products based on Intel’s 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-U: a thin Mini-ITX “IMB-1216” board, a 3.5-inch “SBC-350,” and a NUC 4×4 form-factor “iBox-8365U” mini-PC and NUC-8365U mainboard. ASRock Industrial has been busy lately tapping the latest embedded-oriented x86 chips in products such as the Intel 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-U based iBox-8265U mini-PC, as well as the iBox-R1000 industrial PC and NUC-R1000 mainboard built around the AMD Ryzen Embedded R1000. Now it has announced four more Whiskey Lake-U products aimed at the embedded market.
  • Making Sense of Microsoft’s Acquisition of Express Logic [Ed: Windows is worthless, so Microsoft is buying the competition. Microsoft also bought Danger, Sidekick etc. and it never ended well. Anything Microsoft touches turns to dust. When it bought Skype it was (back then) near-monopoly, but not anymore. Microsoft sometimes announces financial losses.]
    Even the Linux Foundation, home of the Linux kernel, hosts a project called Zephyr, which is an RTOS designed for use-cases, beyond the reach of Linux.

Events: Richard Stallman in Zurich (Switzerland), OpenStack Summit, Linux Fest Northwest

  • Richard Stallman - "Free Software and Your Freedom" (Zurich, Switzerland)
  • SUSE CaaS Platform at Open Infrastructure Summit
    If you’re attending Open Infrastructure Summit this year and have in previous years as well, you might be noticing something a bit different; this year it’s not called OpenStack Summit. While we expect much of the talk will still be about OpenStack, we thought it might be a good idea to include other related technologies as well, like SUSE CaaS Platform, SUSE Cloud Application Platform – the two offerings that combine to form SUSE’s Application Delivery solution – and SUSE Enterprise Storage
  • Gearing Up for Linux Fest Northwest 2019!
    This next weekend (April 26-28th, 2019) I will be in Bellingham at Bellingham Technical College for Linux Fest Northwest to help at the Ubuntu table! I will be demonstrating Ubuntu Studio and my au…
  • Ubuntu Studio at Linux Fest Northwest 2019
    Council Chair Erich Eickmeyer will be in Bellingham, WA, USA this weekend for Linux Fest Northwest 2019, and will be bringing his audio setup to demonstrate Ubuntu Studio at the Ubuntu table. Check out the post on his personal blog!