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Major Zorin OS Linux Release Is Coming This Fall Based on Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS

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OS
Ubuntu

Shipping with the updated HWE (Hardware Enablement) stack from the recently announced Ubuntu 16.04.5 LTS point release, which is powered by the Linux 4.15 kernel from Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), as well as an updated X graphics stack, Zorin OS 12.4 brings all the latest software and security updates from the Ubuntu repositories, along with performance enhancements and bug fixes.

"Zorin OS 12.4 introduces an updated hardware enablement stack. The newly-included Linux kernel 4.15, as well as an updated X server graphics stack," reads the release announcement. "In addition, new patches for system vulnerabilities are included in this release, so you can have the peace of mind knowing that you’re using the most secure version of Zorin OS ever."

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Amiga Enthusiast Gets Quake Running On Killer NIC PowerPC CPU Core

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OS
Hardware
Gaming

The Amiga community remains one of the most passionate and inventive we have ever seen, even now, decades after Commodore’s demise. A couple of weeks back, we featured just a few recent projects that were designed to breathe new life into aging Amiga systems, or at the very least ensure they remain repairable for the foreseeable future. Our article explaining how to build a cheap Amiga emulator using a Raspberry Pi was immensely popular as well. Today, however, we stumbled across a video that encapsulates the ingenuity of many of the more technical folks in the Amiga community. What it shows is an Amiga 3000UX, equipped with a Voodoo 3 card and BigFoot Networks Killer NIC M1, running some software – including Quake – on the Killer NIC’s on-board Power PC processor.

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Elementary OS Juno Brings Only Slight Changes to an Outstanding Platform

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OS
Linux

Elementary OS has been my distribution of choice for some time now. I find it a perfect blend of usability, elegance, and stability. Out of the box, Elementary doesn’t include a lot of apps, but it does offer plenty of style and all the apps you could want are an AppCenter away. And with the upcoming release, the numbering scheme changes. Named Juno, the next iteration will skip the .5 number and go directly to 5.0. Why? Because Elementary OS is far from a pre-release operating system and the development teams wanted to do away with any possible confusion.

Elementary, 0.4 (aka Loki) is about as stable a Linux operating system as I have ever used. And although Elementary OS 5.0 does promise to be a very natural evolution from .4, it is still very much in beta, but ready for testing. Because Juno is based on Ubuntu 18.04, it enjoys a rock-solid base, so the foundation of the OS will already be incredibly stable.

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OpenWrt, the Linux OS for your router, releases a first major update in over two years

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OS
Linux

OpenWrt, the Linux-based open source operating system for routers and other embedded devices, has been updated to version version 18.06. It is the first stable release since the reunification with the forked LEDE (Linux Embedded Development Environment) project. OperWrt 18.06 is the successor to the previous stable LEDE 17.01 and OpenWrt 15.05 releases.

OpenWrt last released a major update, OpenWrt 15.05.1, in March 2016. A few months later, a separate project, LEDE, was forked out of OpenWrt, in an attempt to create an open source community with greater transparency and inclusiveness. LEDE was formed by a group of OpenWrt developers who were not happy with some of the decisions being made by the core OpenWrt team.

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OpenWRT 18.06 Released, Their First Update Since Merging With LEDE

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OS

OpenWRT 18.06 is now available as the router/networking/embedded-focused Linux distribution.

OpenWRT 18.06 is a significant release in that it's the first since the OpenWRT and LEDE projects decided to merge under the unified OpenWRT umbrella following the two year fork of the "Linux Embedded Development Environment" (LEDE).

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Also: IPFire 2.21 – Core Update 122 Introduces New Linux Kernel Support and Overall Improvements

A single-user, lightweight OS for your next home project

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OS

What on earth is RISC OS? Well, it's not a new kind of Linux. And it's not someone's take on Windows. In fact, released in 1987, it's older than either of these. But you wouldn't necessarily realize it by looking at it.

The point-and-click graphic user interface features a pinboard and an icon bar across the bottom for your active applications. So, it looks eerily like Windows 95, eight years before it happened.

This OS was originally written for the Acorn Archimedes. The Acorn RISC Machines CPU in this computer was completely new hardware that needed completely new software to run on it. This was the original operating system for the ARM chip, long before anyone had thought of Android or Armbian.

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Linux Without systemd: Why You Should Use Devuan, the Debian Fork

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OS

Debian 8 was the first version to adopt systemd. The Devuan project began at that time, but the first stable release didn’t land until 2017, alongside the release of Debian 9.

Devuan uses the same APT package manager as Debian, but it maintains its own package repositories. Those are the servers that store the software you download using APT.

Devuan’s repositories contain the same software as Debian, only with patches that enable programs to run without systemd. This mainly refers to backend components such as policykit, which manages which users can access or modify certain parts of your PC.

What Is It Like to Use Devuan?

Just like with Debian, there are multiple ways to install Devuan. The “minimal” download provides you with the essential tools you need to get Devuan up and running on your machine. The “live” download provides you with a working desktop that you can test out before installing Devuan onto your computer.

Devuan uses the Xfce desktop environment by default. This is a traditional computing environment akin to how PC interfaces looked several decades ago. Functionally, Xfce is still able to handle most tasks people have come to expect from computers today.

The live version of Devuan comes with plenty of software to cover general expectations. Mozilla Firefox is available for browsing the web. LibreOffice is there for opening and editing documents. GIMP can alter photos and other images. These apps all function as you would expect, with no concern for which init system you’re running.

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HOPE XII: A FOSS Operating System for e-Readers

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OS
OSS

Free and open source software (FOSS) was a recurring theme during many of the talks during the HOPE XII conference, which should probably come as no surprise. Hackers aren’t big fans of being monitored by faceless corporate overlords or being told what they can and cannot do on the hardware they purchased. Replacing proprietary software with FOSS alternatives is a way to put control back into the hands of the user, so naturally many of the talks pushed the idea.

In most cases that took the form of advising you to move your Windows or Mac OS computer over to a more open operating system such as GNU/Linux. Sound advice if you’re looking for software freedom, but it’s a bit quaint to limit such thinking to the desktop in 2018. We increasingly depend on mobile computing devices, and more often than not those are locked down hard with not only a closed proprietary operating system but also a “Walled Garden” style content delivery system. What’s the point of running all FOSS software at home on your desktop if you’re carrying a proprietary mobile device around?

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New SteamOS Stable Release Brings Latest Updates from Debian GNU/Linux 8.11

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OS
Debian

SteamOS 2.154 has been released today to the brewmaster channel as the new stable version of the operating system and it appears to be based on Debian GNU/Linux 8.11, the last point release of the Debian Jessie operating system series, which reached end of life last month on June 17, 2018.

According to Valve's Pierre-Loup Griffais, SteamOS 2.154 contains the same updates that were pushed earlier this month to the SteamOS 2.151 beta release, so it should be considered a minor bugfix release as Valve continues to work on a major new version that would probably be based on Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" and feature updated kernel and graphics stacks.

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Also: SteamOS 2.154 Released As Valve Preps Kernel & Driver Upgrades

ReactOS 0.4.9 released

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OS

The ReactOS Project is pleased to announce the release of version 0.4.9, the latest in our accelerated cadence targeting a release every three months.

While a consequence of this faster cycle might mean fewer headliner changes, much of the visible effort nowadays comes in the form of quality-of-life improvements in how ReactOS functions. At the same time work continues on the underlying systems which provide more subtle improvements such as greater system stability and general consistency.

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Also: ReactOS 0.4.9 Officially Released As The First Self-Hosting Version, Better Stability

ReactOS 0.4.9 Officially Released with Self-Hosting Capabilities, New Features

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