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AsteroidOS and OpenWatch Aim to Open Up Smartwatch Market

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OS

The AsteroidOS project has released version 1.0 of its open source, Linux-based smartwatch distribution. Designed for after-market installation on “Wear OS by Google” (formerly Android Wear) watches, AsteroidOS can now be dual booted on seven different models. The release follows the late March announcement of an OpenWatch Project for building Android based open source custom ROMs on Wear OS watches.

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Devices: AsteroidOS, Das blinkenlight, Android P

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OS
  • The open source AsteroidOS is a new alternative to Wear OS

    AsteroidOS is a new Linux-based open source operating system that can be used as a replacement to Wear OS.

    A small team of developers have been hard at work on the smartwatch platform for the last four years. As the culmination of their efforts, this week the first stable version was made available to the public. It plays nice with a few Wear OS-compatible smartwatches.

  • Das blinkenlights are back thanks to RPi revival of the PDP-11

    The designers left the I2C port of the Raspberry Pi free for hacks, and “it is not very hard to add support for such things in the simh emulator, so the PiDP-11 can use them as I/O”.

    The SR switches on the PiDP-11's SR switches can be set to boot various operating systems (this part is a work in progress), so instead of RSX-11MPlus users can choose BSD, DOS-11, Unix System 6 or System 7 and the like.

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  • How Android P Will Increase Battery Life

Parrot 4.0 Ethical Hacking OS Debuts with MD Raid Support, Stable Sandboxed Apps

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OS

Powered by the latest Linux 4.16 kernel series, Parrot 4.0 is a major release of the GNU/Linux distribution designed for ethical hacking and penetration testing operations. It's the first to introduce stable, reliable support for sandboxed applications as an extra layer of security, and official Netinstall and Docker images.

"Parrot on Docker gives you access to all the Parrot containers you need on top of Windows, Mac OS, or any other system supported by docker, no matter if it is just your laptop or a whole docker cluster running on an entire datacenter. You will always have access to all the parrot tools in all the isolated environments you need," said the devs.

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GNU/Linux vs. Unix: What's the difference?

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OS
GNU
Linux

If you are a software developer in your 20s or 30s, you've grown up in a world dominated by Linux. It has been a significant player in the data center for decades, and while it's hard to find definitive operating system market share reports, Linux's share of data center operating systems could be as high as 70%, with Windows variants carrying nearly all the remaining percentage. Developers using any major public cloud can expect the target system will run Linux. Evidence that Linux is everywhere has grown in recent years when you add in Android and Linux-based embedded systems in smartphones, TVs, automobiles, and many other devices.

Even so, most software developers, even those who have grown up during this venerable "Linux revolution" have at least heard of Unix. It sounds similar to Linux, and you've probably heard people use these terms interchangeably. Or maybe you've heard Linux called a "Unix-like" operating system.

So, what is this Unix? The caricatures speak of wizard-like "graybeards" sitting behind glowing green screens, writing C code and shell scripts, powered by old-fashioned, drip-brewed coffee. But Unix has a much richer history beyond those bearded C programmers from the 1970s. While articles detailing the history of Unix and "Unix vs. Linux" comparisons abound, this article will offer a high-level background and a list of major differences between these complementary worlds.

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Video of AsteroidOS

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OS
Android
Linux

What Linux apps on Chrome OS means for open source

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OS
Linux
OSS

I own a Pixel 2 laptop. Right now, it's collecting dust, which is a shame, as it's some of the best hardware I've ever used. And don't get me wrong, for the longest time I used that Pixel proudly. But eventually I needed more like when edits came back for a book and Google Docs didn't handle MS Office Track Changes, which it can now do, or when I needed to work with an image editor and Pixlr simply wouldn't cut it. In all honesty, there were more moments like that than not.

But I don't consider myself an average user (for which the Chromebook is perfectly suited). So eventually I put the Pixel on a shelf, in favor of a MacBook Pro. Although that particular hardware isn't quite as nice as the Pixel (battery life, keyboard, and screen layout pale in comparison), it allowed me to get my work done without much of a struggle.

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Tiny, Linux-driven i.MX7 module starts at $34 in volume

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OS
Linux

E-Con’s 55 x 30mm “eSOMiMX7” COM can simultaneously run Linux and FreeRTOS on the Cortex-A7 and MCU-driven i.MX7 SoC. It offers up to 2GB RAM and 64GB eMMC, with options including WiFi/BT, up to 2x GbE, extended temp support, and an “Acacia” carrier.

E-Con Systems’ eSOMiMX7 computer-on-module is the first NXP i.MX7 based model in its line of Linux-driven eSOM branded modules. These include its i.MX6-based 70 x 45mm “μQseven” form-factor eSOMiMX6 and 54 x 20mm eSOMiMX6-micro. Designed for IoT applications, industrial HMI, test and measurement, ebook readers, and wearables, the module supports 800MHz single- or 1GHz dual-core i.MX7 models and is available with an Acacia evaluation kit (see farther below).

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Endless OS Picks Up Companion App for Android, Smarter Updates in Major Release

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OS
Android

Packed with dozens of stability and performance improvements, the Endless OS 3.4 release is one of those major ones that you'll have to install on your personal computer if you're running the Linux-based Endless OS. It features an enhanced GNOME 3.26 desktop environment with smarter updates to help you manage data consumption on limited data plans.

Additionally, Endless OS 3.4 marks the introduction of the Endless Companion App for Android smartphones, which will be available in the coming weeks and promises to let users view content from their Endless OS computers on their Android phones while enjoying the features of the native Endless OS apps.

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Also: Endless OS 3.4 Released, Allows Scheduled Updates & Companion App For Android

Here's what happens to CoreOS now that Red Hat owns it

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OS
Red Hat

One of the biggest questions at Red Hat Summit in San Francisco was "What will Red Hat be doing with its recent CoreOS acquisition?" Now we know. In a presentation, Ben Breard, Red Hat product manager for Linux Containers, and Brandon Philips, CTO of CoreOS, explained where CoreOS offerings are going now that the company is part of Red Hat.

Red Hat will be integrating CoreOS Tectonic, its Kubernetes distribution; Quay, its enterprise container registry; and Container Linux, its lightweight cluster Linux distribution, into Red Hat's container and Kubernetes-based software portfolio. One popular CoreOS technology won't be making the trip: The rkt container standard. Instead, it will become a community-supported container technology.

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Also: Bringing CoreOS technology to Red Hat OpenShift to deliver a next-generation automated Kubernetes platform

Red Hat Unveils Roadmap for CoreOS Integration with Red Hat OpenShift

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