Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OS

Chrome OS Stable Channel Gets Linux Apps

Filed under
OS
Linux
Google

After months of user testing in developer and beta channels, the Crostini project at Google finally delivered the goods, Linux apps for most users of Chromebooks in the stable channel—definitely worth the wait. While this still is aimed primarily at developers using Chromebooks, I think there's a good chance these Linux apps will be used and enjoyed by the general public using Chromebooks as well. There's still a bit of a learning curve to overcome before that possibility is realized, but if you already are a user of any Linux distro, it will feel very familiar. Here's an overview of how to install it and what to expect afterward.

After getting the update to version 69, go to Settings and scroll down a bit, and you'll see the option to turn on Linux apps. Figure 1 shows this first step. Note that this isn't available on all Chromebooks; if you're using an older one, you'll have to wait a while before this function is available. If you don't see the option to turn on Linux apps, your Chromebook currently lacks that functionality. But, if you have a Chromebook produced in the past two years, you probably will see the option.

Read more

After 16 Years of Development, The First Beta of Haiku is Finally Here

Filed under
OS

Haiku’s history begins with the now defunct Be Inc. Be Inc was founded by former Apple executive Jean-Louis Gassée after he was ousted by CEO John Sculley. Gassée wanted to create a new operating system from the ground up. BeOS was created with digital media work in mind and was designed to take advantage of the most modern hardware of the time. Originally, Be Inc attempted to create their own platform encompassing both hardware and software. The result was called the BeBox. After BeBox failed to sell well, Be turned their attention to BeOS.

In the 1990s, Apple was looking for a new operating system to replace the aging Classic Mac OS. The two contenders were Gassée’s BeOS and Steve Jobs’ NeXTSTEP. In the end, Apple went with NeXTSTEP. Be tried to license BeOS to hardware makers, but in at least one case Microsoft threatened to revoke a manufacturer’s Windows license if they sold BeOS machines. Eventually, Be Inc was sold to Palm in 2001 for $11 million. BeOS was subsequently discontinued.

Read more

“Made By Google” Event

Filed under
OS
Android
Google

First VyOS 1.2.0 release candidate is available for download

Filed under
OS

This month, the VyOS project turns five years old. In these five years, VyOS has been through highs and lows, up to speculation that the project is dead. Past year has been full of good focused work by the core team and community contributors, but the only way to make use of that work was to use nightly builds, and nightly builds are like a chocolate box a box of WWI era shells—you never know if it blows up when handled or not. Now the codebase has stabilized, and we are ready to present a release candidate. While it has some rough edges, a number of people, including us, are already using recent builds of VyOS 1.2.0 in production, and now it's time to make it public.

Read more

Update on /e/ (Formerly Eelo, Android Without Google) and Android/Google News

Filed under
OS
Android

Qubes OS 3.2.1-rc1 has been released!

Filed under
OS
Security

We’re pleased to announce the first release candidate for Qubes 3.2.1! This is the first and only planned point release for version 3.2. Features:

Fedora 28 TemplateVM
Debian 9 TemplateVM
Whonix 14 Gateway and Workstation TemplateVMs
Linux kernel 4.14

Read more

China's going to make a mobile OS and everyone will love it, predict ball-gazing analysts

Filed under
OS

Huawei last year denied reports that it's developing its own mobile OS to lessen its dependence on US giants like Google.

The South China Morning Post had reported that Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei blessed the doomsday project, to be activated in case of a "worst-case scenario". The Alibaba-owned paper said Huawei has such projects already running on PCs and tablets. Execs said it had no need to do so, finding Android perfectly acceptable.

But the European Commission is keen for competition to Google to develop, and doesn't see it coming from outside the Android ecosystem because of the dearth of apps on any new platform. Logically, then, the competition will come from forks built on the Android Open Source Project (AOSP) base.

In its always-interesting annual predictions, CCS Insight has said the prospect is real and possibly even likely by 2022, as US tech dominance fragments. CCS sees China taking a lead in 5G and winning mindshare for its home-grown services.

Read more

Dragora 3.0 Alpha 2 Released As One Of The Libre GNU/Linux Platforms

Filed under
OS
GNU

Dragora is one of the lesser known Linux distributions that is focused on shipping "entirely free software" to the standards of the FSF/GNU.

Dragora is focused on simplicity and elegance while being a "quality GNU/Linux distribution." With the Dragora 3.0 Alpha 2 release they continue working on transitioning to the Musl C library, restructuring of the file-system directories, transitioning over to the SysVinit init system, enhancements to the boot script, improving the initial LiveCD experience, upgrading to the GCC 8 compiler stack, adding Meson+Ninja support, improving the security, making use of LibreSSL 2.8, and a variety of other alterations.

Read more

Sparcstation in Development

Filed under
OS
Development

Review: Google’s Wear OS 2.0 can’t fix its obsolete smartwatch hardware

Filed under
OS
Google
Reviews

Google's major Wear OS revamp is out today, and soon it will arrive on most devices released in the past year and a half (although Ars has already spent a week with a pre-release version of the OS). In the face of relentless competition from the Apple Watch Series 4 and Samsung Galaxy Watch, Google's most obvious change in the new Wear OS is a new UI for most of the main screens. There's not much in the way of new functionality or features, but everything is laid out better.

Google hasn't done much to publicize the actual name of this release, but it identifies the update as "Wear OS 2.0" on the "About" page, so we're calling it that. Don't confuse "Wear OS 2.0" with "Android Wear 2.0," though, because the latter launched in 2017. When the name change from "Android Wear" to "Wear OS" happened, the version numbers reset. Android Wear started at "1.0" and made it all the way to "2.9;" Wear OS then started over at "1.0" and counted back up to "2.0." Continuing the old version numbers would have made things a lot easier: Google and terrible branding—name a more iconic duo.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2018 - 8:47pm
Story Chrome OS Stable Channel Gets Linux Apps Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2018 - 8:37pm
Story KDE: Supporting KDE via AmazonSmile, Krita Fundraiser, Qt-Related Hirings, KDE Project Funding Roy Schestowitz 3 15/10/2018 - 3:54pm
Story Games Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/10/2018 - 3:26pm
Story Windows 10 October 2018 Update Performance Against Ubuntu 18.10, Fedora 29 Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2018 - 3:16pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2018 - 3:09pm
Story Release of KDE Frameworks 5.51.0 Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2018 - 2:57pm
Story Linux 4.19-rc8 Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2018 - 2:52pm
Story Kali Linux for Vagrant: Hands-on Rianne Schestowitz 15/10/2018 - 2:49pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/10/2018 - 7:13am