Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OS

Development: LibreOffice Asia Conference 2019, Fedora Development Docs, GNOME Online Accounts (GOA) and Another Developer Gathering for Devuan

Filed under
OS
LibO
  • LibreOffice Asia Conference 2019, Tokyo: Call for Papers is open

    Call for Papers for LibreOffice Asia Conference 2019, held at the Nihonbashi Tokyo Tower (at Cyboze, Inc., Tokyo Office) on May 25th (Sat) and 26th (Sun), is now open.

    LibreOffice Asia Conference will be the first event gathering LibreOffice users, advocates and contributors (not only development, but also localization, PR/marketing, documentation, quality assurance, … etc.) from different countries in Asia, to exchange and share experiences and knowledge.

    During the conference, we will discuss LibreOffice related business such as supporting and training, migrating to LibreOffice and the ODF true standard format, developing, and any other community activity in Asia. In addition, we will have guests from the core team at The Document Foundation, which is a charitable foundation and the home of LibreOffice.

  • Fedora IoT Docs are Live

    Design ideas: My focus was on technical content. The basic layout is dictated by the Fedora Docs project but a bit of design work on the welcome page and the addition of any IoT specific logos would be nice. Also, there are a few screenshots that could use a pointer or box to highlight the area described in the text.

    Verify links for downloads and upgrades: The working group now has regular updated images available in a CDN and the next downloadable image is in progress along with the final version of the landing page for downloads. Once the update and release schedule process is smoothed out, the documentation needs to be verified.

    Get ready for F30: When Fedora 30 is ready, the site will need some Release Notes and the User Guide will need some updates to cover new features. You can submit suggestions as iot-docs issues in pagure.

  • Some challenges for GNOME online accounts

    The cynical among us might be tempted to think that an announcement from the GNOME project about the removal of a feature — a relatively unused feature at that — would be an unremarkable event. In practice, though, Debarshi Ray's announcement that the GNOME Online Accounts (GOA) subsystem would no longer support the "documents" access point touched off a lengthy discussion within the project itself. The resulting discussion revealed a few significant problems with GOA and, indeed, with the concept of online-account management in any sort of open-source umbrella project like GNOME.

    GOA is meant to provide a single sign on system integrating GNOME applications with web-based services. Any application that, for example, wants to access files stored in Google Drive would ordinarily have to ask the user for credentials and log into Drive separately, which gets tiresome for users running a lot of applications. By routing this access through GOA, the GNOME developers hope to simplify the process of using those services. GOA includes a number of different "integration points" for different types of services, including files, email, calendars, contacts, and more.

    The "documents" point was used by the Documents application, which is meant to help users manage their documents. It has suffered, though, from a lack of both users and developers and lacks basic features; Michael Catanzaro described it as "basically just 'bad evince'". That certainly restricts its prospects for success; as Ray put it: "it doesn't stand any chance of adoption unless it can open files like /usr/bin/evince". Documents has duly been removed from the core set of GNOME applications. Since it was the only core application using the "documents" integration point, that point is now being removed.

  • Systemd-Free Debian "Devuan" Planning Their First Developer Gathering This Spring

    For fans of Devuan, the downstream of Debian focused on "init system independence" or just "Debian without systemd", their first-ever conference is happening in just over one month.

Wind River Linux and VxWorks team up for new Helix Virtualization Platform

Filed under
OS
Linux

Wind River Helix Virtualization Platform combines Wind River Linux and VxWorks under a common, cloud-managed edge computing platform. Features include virtualization and safety certified functionality, and support for guest OSes and mixed-criticality workloads.

Read more

Zorin operating system

Filed under
OS
Linux

Over the years, operating systems have popped up that offer safer, easier to use alternatives to Windows and Apple. You may have heard of a few: Linux, Chrome OS, FreeBSD, Syllable, ReactOS, Ubuntu, and the list goes on.

An alternative that you haven't heard of is called Zorin OS, and it's been around since 2008. Here's a quick look at what we know about Zorin and whether or not you should use it.

Read more

Toughened up i.MX6 SBC offers NimbleLink cellular expansion

Filed under
OS
Linux

VersaLogic’s rugged, Linux-friendly “Swordfish” SBC is equipped with a dual- or quad-core i.MX6 with up to 4GB RAM plus eMMC, GbE, HDMI, LVDS, USB, WiFi/BT, and a NimbleLink socket for cellular expansion.

VersaLogic has posted preliminary specs for a $239 and up Swordfish SBC that runs Linux and other Arm-friendly operating systems on a Cortex-A9 based NXP i.MX6. There’s an optional 8GB microSD card with a Yocto Project configured Linux image. The rugged SBC is designed for industrial machine automation, transportation, medical, kiosk, and industrial IoT applications.

Read more

Google: GNU/Linux Under Chrome OS, Foxxum Launches Linux AOSP UI

Filed under
OS
Android
GNU
Linux
Google
  • Chrome OS 74 will enable audio for Linux apps

    You can install and run Linux apps on most recent Chromebooks thanks to Google’s Crostini software. That makes Chromebooks feel a lot more like “real” laptops, since you can now run desktop software like GIMP or LibreOffice. But there are a few things Linux apps still can’t do.

    They don’t support hardware-accelerated graphics. And they don’t support audio. But that second restriction looks like it’s on its way out.

  • Foxxum launches Linux AOSP UI

    China-based OEM Asano’s products are sold in more than 110 countries and as part of the new deal, Asano will integrate the Foxxum app store on all sold devices. It will feature global and local apps and custom-made interface and designs for all brands. The app store will be available on Linux and AOSP OS based devices from beginning of 2019 to deliver what the companies says will be ‘competitive’, next generation smart TV user experiences.

    “Working with Foxxum’s app store will allow us to further enhance our products,” remarked Asano CEO He Xing. “The company’s know-how, speed and professionalism fits our high-quality standards and most importantly will satisfy our customer’s demands.”

What is project /e/? Should you install it on your Android smartphone?

Filed under
OS
Android

Have you ever thought about how secure your Android device, let’s be clear, not very much. Now you might be wondering why? It is because due to Android being open source many apps can track you. However, if you are even a bit into flashing new ROMs onto your smartphone or even rooting your mobile /e/ might be the thing you want to read about right now.

The /e/ ROM helps enhance device security and makes your Android powered smartphone much more secure. /e/ is a project of the E-Foundation, which is focused on enhancing a user’s device security by restricting anything that logs user data. As per the company, /e/ is a non-profit project, made in public interest. The E Foundation is building an open-source mobile operating system, which respects a user’s data privacy.

Project /e/ provides a great and unique mobile operating system alternative, stripped down of all the services that might collect and use user data. Things like Google services that collect user information anonymously are stripped down and replaced with things like microG services which enable users to enjoy the benefits of Android without Google collecting their data.

Read more

Linux Vs. Unix: What's the Difference?

Filed under
OS
Linux

Linux and Unix are often compared to each other. If the similarity in their names wasn't enough, Linux is technically a descendant of Unix, and they share a number of similarities in tool kits and overall structure. They aren't exactly the same, though, and the approaches and philosophies behind them are radically different.

Read more

elementary 5 "Juno"

Filed under
OS
Interviews
Reviews

In the spring of 2014 (nearly five years ago), I was preparing a regular presentation I give most years—where I look at the bad side (and the good side) of the greater Linux world. As I had done in years prior, I was preparing a graph showing the market share of various Linux distributions changing over time.

But, this year, something was different.

In the span of less than two years, a tiny little Linux distro came out of nowhere to become one of the most watched and talked about systems available. In the blink of an eye, it went from nothing to passing several grand-daddies of Linux flavors that had been around for decades.

This was elementary. Needless to say, it caught my attention.

Read more

postmarketOS – A Linux Distribution for Mobile Devices

Filed under
OS
Android

Not too long ago, I published an article on TecMint about 13 Most Promising New Linux Distributions to Look Forward in 2019 in which I listed a distro for mobile phones, Bliss OS.

Today, I introduce to you a free, open source, and futuristic project that aims to bring mobile devices together in one swoop.

postmarketOS is a touch-optimized, security-focused, and pre-configured Alpine-based Linux distribution created to be compatible with several old and new devices.

Below is an introduction from the developers themselves,

Read more

Ethical Hacking, Ubuntu-Based BackBox Linux OS Is Now Available on AWS

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu

If you want to run BackBox Linux in the cloud, on your AWS account, you should know that the ethical hacking operating system is now available on the Amazon Web Services cloud platform as an Amazon Machine Image (AMI) virtual appliance that you can install with a few mouse clicks.

The BackBox Linux operating system promises to offer Amazon Web Services users an optimal environment for professional penetration testing operations as it puts together a collection of some of the best ethical hacking tools, which are already configured and ready for production use.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Games: Strange Loop Games and City Builder

Debian GNU/Linux riscv64 port in mid 2019

As it can be seen in the first graph, perhaps with some difficulty, is that the percent of arch-dependent packages built for riscv64 (grey line) has been around or higher than 80% since mid 2018, just a few months after the port was added to the infrastructure. Given than the arch-dependent packages are about half of the Debian['s main, unstable] archive and that (in simple terms) arch-independent packages can be used by all ports (provided that the software that they rely on is present, e.g. a programming language interpreter), this means that around 90% of packages of the whole archive has been available for this architecture from early on. Read more

Latest Security FUD

Software: Synapse, Qmmp and LibreOffice

  • How to install and use Synapse, the MacOS Spotlight alternative for Linux
    Mac OS is everybody’s favorite, and there are several reasons behind it. One of the most useful utilities you can find on Mac OS is Spotlight, which makes searching for things a piece of cake, all directly from the desktop. While most developers have already designed similar utilities for Windows, the open-source Linux based operating systems are no exception, as well. Most Linux operating systems like Ubuntu have its own search functionality, but it can sometimes be troublesome to reach there and isn’t as powerful as Spotlight. So with Synapse for Linux, you can do just that, and boost the power of the search functionality on your system. With Synapse for Ubuntu, you can even search for things on the web, which is cool, as well. Some Linux distros like Lubuntu, don’t offer decent search functionality, and Synapse can be a great solution in such cases. With Synapse, searching is easy with just the navigation buttons on your keyboard, and you are ready to go. Synapse can be downloaded and installed from the Linux official repository. Synapse can also be configured to run on startup so that too don’t need to search for, and open Synapse, each time you need to use it.
  • Qmmp 1.3.3 Released with Floating PulseAudio, ALSA, OSS4 Support
    Qmmp, Qt based audio player, released version 1.3.3 with improvements and bug fixes. Here’s how to install it in Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 18.10, Ubuntu 19.04.
  • Office Suites for Ubuntu 18.04
    Today we are looking at different office suites for Ubuntu 18.04. LibreOffice is the default LibreOffice suite for Ubuntu but it is by all means not the only one. In this article, we will look at different office suites for Ubuntu and all of its pros and cons. All these Office Suites are available for at least all Ubuntu based distros, and the installation method is the same for all the Ubuntu based distros.
  • Week 3 Report
    I continue working on Rewriting the logger messages with the new DSL grammar: