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Flatcar Linux: The CoreOS Operating System Lives on Beyond Red Hat

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OS
Linux
Red Hat

As part of the integration between the product lines of the company that put containerized Linux on the map and the most powerful name in all of enterprise Linux, Red Hat has said it will adopt the “CoreOS” name for its forthcoming edition of its own Linux for containers. Yet although “Red Hat CoreOS” will adopt the self-updating technology that made CoreOS Inc.’s products competitive, a Red Hat official told The New Stack, the kernel will remain essentially compatible with the Fedora/Atomic/RHEL base it has already produced, for reasons the official said mainly concerned maintaining the certification of systems running on that kernel.

So while Red Hat makes plans for what to do with the CoreOS Container Linux, others are also eyeing the code base which after all, continues to be an open source project licensed under Apache 2.0. During the last KubeCon + CloudNativeCon in Copenhagen, attendees were re-introduced to Kinvolk, a Berlin-based group of open source contributors, including Chris Kühl, who were early contributors to the rkt container runtime devised at CoreOS and since donated to the CNCF. Now, Kühl and his colleagues have committed to producing and maintaining a fork of CoreOS Container Linux. Called Flatcar Linux, its immediate goal is to maintain its container-agnostic architecture, and maybe later try resuming its own development path.

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Android-Based RaspAnd OS for Raspberry Pi 3 Gets Bluetooth, Wi-Fi Improvements

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OS
Android
Linux

Coming almost half a year after the last release, which brought support for the official Raspberry Pi 7-inch touchscreen and smart TVs, RaspAnd Build 180529 remains based on the Android 7.1.2 Nougat mobile operating system but updates various components to their latest versions at the moment of writing.

Among these, we can mention Google Play Services 12.6.85 and Google Play store 10.1.08-all included in the GAPPS (Google Apps) package, Kodi 18.0 Alpha 2 media center, TeamViewer 13.1.8817, Jelly Browser 7.1.2, Aptoide TV 4.0.2, ES File Explorer 4.1.7.2, Chess 2.4.0, AIDA64 1.51, Termux 0.60, and Quick Reboot Pro 1.8.4.

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Devices: Ibase, OpenWatch, Purism

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OS
Linux
Hardware
  • 3.5-inch Apollo Lake SBC supports industrial temperatures

    Ibase’s Linux-compatible, 3.5-inch “IB818” SBC provides a dual- or quad-core Apollo Lake SoC, plus 2x GbE, 4x USB 3.0, 2x SATA, 2x mini-PCIe, triple display support, wide-range power, and -40 to 85°C support.

  • AsteroidOS and OpenWatch offer open alternatives to smartwatch stacks

    The open source, Linux based “AsteroidOS” alternative to Wear OS arrives in a stable 1.0 release, and Block spins off some of its Android smartwatch stack as an open source OpenWatch Project.

    The AsteroidOS project has released version 1.0 of its open source, Linux-based smartwatch distribution. Designed for after-market installation on “Wear OS by Google” (formerly Android Wear) watches, AsteroidOS can now be dual booted on seven different models. The release follows the late March announcement of an OpenWatch Project for building Android based open source custom ROMs on Wear OS watches.

  • Purism Publishes Librem 5 Dev Kit Details, Small Batch Order Going In Soon

    Purism has published their nearly final specifications on their limited-run Librem 5 Dev Kit. The cutoff for ordering a developer kit is next week as they are placing their hardware order and planning on only this single, limited run of the developer kit prior to the phones becoming available next year.

    Their deadline for ordering a developer kit is the end of the month and the kit price has raised to $399 USD. In the process, Purism believes they are still on track for their January 2019 for coming up with having the phone's actual hardware ready.

AsteroidOS and OpenWatch Aim to Open Up Smartwatch Market

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OS

The AsteroidOS project has released version 1.0 of its open source, Linux-based smartwatch distribution. Designed for after-market installation on “Wear OS by Google” (formerly Android Wear) watches, AsteroidOS can now be dual booted on seven different models. The release follows the late March announcement of an OpenWatch Project for building Android based open source custom ROMs on Wear OS watches.

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Devices: AsteroidOS, Das blinkenlight, Android P

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OS
  • The open source AsteroidOS is a new alternative to Wear OS

    AsteroidOS is a new Linux-based open source operating system that can be used as a replacement to Wear OS.

    A small team of developers have been hard at work on the smartwatch platform for the last four years. As the culmination of their efforts, this week the first stable version was made available to the public. It plays nice with a few Wear OS-compatible smartwatches.

  • Das blinkenlights are back thanks to RPi revival of the PDP-11

    The designers left the I2C port of the Raspberry Pi free for hacks, and “it is not very hard to add support for such things in the simh emulator, so the PiDP-11 can use them as I/O”.

    The SR switches on the PiDP-11's SR switches can be set to boot various operating systems (this part is a work in progress), so instead of RSX-11MPlus users can choose BSD, DOS-11, Unix System 6 or System 7 and the like.

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  • How Android P Will Increase Battery Life

Parrot 4.0 Ethical Hacking OS Debuts with MD Raid Support, Stable Sandboxed Apps

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OS

Powered by the latest Linux 4.16 kernel series, Parrot 4.0 is a major release of the GNU/Linux distribution designed for ethical hacking and penetration testing operations. It's the first to introduce stable, reliable support for sandboxed applications as an extra layer of security, and official Netinstall and Docker images.

"Parrot on Docker gives you access to all the Parrot containers you need on top of Windows, Mac OS, or any other system supported by docker, no matter if it is just your laptop or a whole docker cluster running on an entire datacenter. You will always have access to all the parrot tools in all the isolated environments you need," said the devs.

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GNU/Linux vs. Unix: What's the difference?

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OS
GNU
Linux

If you are a software developer in your 20s or 30s, you've grown up in a world dominated by Linux. It has been a significant player in the data center for decades, and while it's hard to find definitive operating system market share reports, Linux's share of data center operating systems could be as high as 70%, with Windows variants carrying nearly all the remaining percentage. Developers using any major public cloud can expect the target system will run Linux. Evidence that Linux is everywhere has grown in recent years when you add in Android and Linux-based embedded systems in smartphones, TVs, automobiles, and many other devices.

Even so, most software developers, even those who have grown up during this venerable "Linux revolution" have at least heard of Unix. It sounds similar to Linux, and you've probably heard people use these terms interchangeably. Or maybe you've heard Linux called a "Unix-like" operating system.

So, what is this Unix? The caricatures speak of wizard-like "graybeards" sitting behind glowing green screens, writing C code and shell scripts, powered by old-fashioned, drip-brewed coffee. But Unix has a much richer history beyond those bearded C programmers from the 1970s. While articles detailing the history of Unix and "Unix vs. Linux" comparisons abound, this article will offer a high-level background and a list of major differences between these complementary worlds.

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Video of AsteroidOS

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OS
Android
Linux

What Linux apps on Chrome OS means for open source

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OS
Linux
OSS

I own a Pixel 2 laptop. Right now, it's collecting dust, which is a shame, as it's some of the best hardware I've ever used. And don't get me wrong, for the longest time I used that Pixel proudly. But eventually I needed more like when edits came back for a book and Google Docs didn't handle MS Office Track Changes, which it can now do, or when I needed to work with an image editor and Pixlr simply wouldn't cut it. In all honesty, there were more moments like that than not.

But I don't consider myself an average user (for which the Chromebook is perfectly suited). So eventually I put the Pixel on a shelf, in favor of a MacBook Pro. Although that particular hardware isn't quite as nice as the Pixel (battery life, keyboard, and screen layout pale in comparison), it allowed me to get my work done without much of a struggle.

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More in Tux Machines

Windows 10 October 2018 Update Performance Against Ubuntu 18.10, Fedora 29

As the latest of our benchmarks using the newly re-released Microsoft Windows 10 October 2018 Update, here are benchmarks of this latest Windows 10 build against seven different Linux distributions on the same hardware for checking out the current performance of these operating systems. For this latest Linux OS benchmarking comparison against Windows, the following platforms were tested: - The Windows 10 April 2018 release as the previous major milestone of Windows 10. - The newest Windows 10 October 2018 build as the latest Windows 10 build from Microsoft. - OpenSUSE Tumbleweed as the openSUSE rolling-release distribution that as of testing was on the Linux 4.18.12 kernel, KDE Plasma 5.14, Mesa 18.1.7, and GCC 8.2.1 atop an XFS home file-system with Btrfs root file-system (the default partitioning scheme). Read more

Android Leftovers

Release of KDE Frameworks 5.51.0

KDE Frameworks are 70 addon libraries to Qt which provide a wide variety of commonly needed functionality in mature, peer reviewed and well tested libraries with friendly licensing terms. For an introduction see the Frameworks 5.0 release announcement. This release is part of a series of planned monthly releases making improvements available to developers in a quick and predictable manner. Read more Also: KDE Frameworks 5.51 Released

Linux 4.19-rc8

As mentioned last week, here's a -rc8 release as it seems needed. There were a lot of "little" pull requests this week, semi-normal for this late in the cycle, but a lot of them were "fix up the previous fix I just sent" which implies that people are having a few issues still. I also know of at least one "bad" bug that finally has a proposed fix, so that should hopefully get merged this week. And there are some outstanding USB fixes I know of that have not yet landed in the tree (I blame me for that...) Anyway, the full shortlog is below, lots of tiny things all over the tree. Please go and test and ensure that all works well for you. Hopefully this should be the last -rc release. Read more Also: Linux 4.19-rc8 Released With A Lot Of "Tiny Things"