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BeleniX 0.7 OpenSolaris Desktop

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OS

phoronix.com: Long before Sun's Project Indiana came about, BeleniX has been one of our favorite GNU/Solaris distributions. BeleniX has been a LiveCD based upon OpenSolaris, but with yesterday's release of BeleniX 0.7 it is now a source-level derivative of the Project Indiana blend of OpenSolaris. Today we're taking a quick look at this new release.

Putting Windows On A Diet ... To Compete With Linux

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informationweek.com/blog: How scared is Microsoft of Linux? There's a hint or two of its fear in the fact that MS is preparing a special slim-and-trim version of Windows XP, within the next month or two, to run specifically on Asus's Eee PC.

Also: Microsoft looks to avoid losses to Linux in embedded OS market

Linux, Unix more reliable than Windows

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OS

theinquirer.net: The Yankee Group has been busy again this year, but its latest report seems to offer a very different story to last year’s, with Windows now performing significantly worse than its Linux and Unix rivals.

Also: Windows (in)security and open source

Five Ways Vista is Better than Linux!

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OS

traveller301.wordpress: I am going to briefly list five reasons I would say Vista is better than Linux. I am not passing a final judgement between the two OSes. I firmly believe it is best to leave the choice of OS up to the end user. I currently use OS X, Fedora 8, Ubuntu 7.10, openSUSE, Windows XP, Windows Server 2003 and Windows Vista.

The Linux lesson Windows needs

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OS

Dana Blankenhorn: Gartner analysts are running about in Las Vegas, hair on fire, shouting that Windows is collapsing. Or about to collapse. This is easy to get snarky about, but for Linux’ sake I hope it never happens.

Also: Linux or open source?

How Google could Win the OS Wars

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OS

Matt Hartley: For a number of years now, Google has been waging a battle to win over your desktop without ever settling for one OS platform. Opting to play it safe by not entering the platform wars, but what if they were to put this mindset aside, and find themselves in a position to take on Microsoft in a more direct way? I think they might be able to make it work, so long as they utilize the following commonsense strategy.

Also: gOS Goes with Awn!

RSA: Security Experts Debate Linux Vs. Microsoft

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OS

crn.com: Like the Hatfields and McCoys, some debates are as old as the hills, and no one ever seems to win. In the IT industry, security pundits have long been arguing the question of whether Linux is more secure than Windows with similarly inconclusive results.

OS Smackdown: Linux vs. Mac OS X vs. Windows Vista vs. Windows XP

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OS

computerworld.com: Since the dawn of time -- or, at least, the dawn of personal computers -- the holy wars over desktop operating systems have raged, with each faction proclaiming the unrivaled superiority of its chosen OS and the vile loathsomeness of all others.

Succession Matters for Linux (and everyone else)

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aplawrence.com: At Linux in the long run I expressed the opinion that Linux in general could suffer when Linus Torvalds steps aside or dies. That opinion is generally unpopular with the Linux community, but I think it's defensible.

Low-cost laptop wars: Vista, XP or Linux?

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pcadvisor.co.uk: As the release of low-cost laptops based on Intel's upcoming Atom processor draws near, Microsoft is getting boxed into a corner. Microsoft plans to stop selling most Windows XP licences after 30 June, yet most of these low-cost laptops won't be powerful enough to run Vista when they arrive later this year. That leaves Microsoft executives with a choice: do they extend the availability of Windows XP for low-cost laptops, or possibly concede this nascent market to Linux?

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Is Open Source an Open Invitation to Hack Webmail Encryption?

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