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A quick visual tour of MeeGo 1.0 for netbooks

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OS

From seemingly out of nowhere yesterday MeeGo, a Linux Foundation-approved alliance between Nokia and Intel, released v1.0 of what they’re calling the netbook user experience. Way to channel Jimi Hendrix there.

So like the band with the similar name, will MeeGo blow your mind? Let’s find out…

[Howto] RHCS: install on Debian

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OS
Linux
HowTos

Following our earlier introduction to RHCS we now present a real world example: installation of RHCS with Debian to provide virtual machines as services.

OpenSolaris and its killer features. Coming to a GNU/Linux near you?

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OS

freesoftwaremagazine.com: When we think of free operating systems we tend to think overwhelmingly of the big hitters (all GNU/Linux) like Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora and Mandriva and then of those niche distros that have been designed for low end systems or for specialist purposes like security and forensics. But Oranges are not the only fruit.

The Consumer Electronics OS War

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OS

pcmag.com: There's a major battle for OS domination in the consumer electronic space that may make the ones occurring on PCs and smartphones small by comparison.

Haiku OS Makes Way With Second Alpha

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OS

h-online.com: Eight months after releasing the first alpha of the desktop, open source, operating system, the developers have released R1/Alpha 2 of Haiku, the successor to BeOS.

The Race to Build a Secure Operating System

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OS

defensetech.org: In response to the continuous compromise of networks, multiple countries have begun developing secure platforms and operating systems.

Frankenstein’s Netbook

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OS

limulus.wordpress: or, what I learned from triple-booting an MSI Wind U100…

Operating Systems on the AAO

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OS
Linux
Microsoft

elevenislouder.blogspot: Recently, I came into the possession of an Acer Aspire One (AOA150, ZG5). It's a modest netbook with a 160GB IDE, 1GB of RAM, and an Intel Atom N270 CPU. I was trying to find one OS that would be responsive, stable, energy conservative, and one that would support all of the AAOs hardware. The following were my results:

Upcoming Fedora Test Days: preupgrade and Xfce!

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OS
Linux

This week we round out the Fedora 13 Test Day schedule, which has seen us run the gauntlet from NFS, through color management and SSSD, scale the heights of Graphics Test Week, and will see us come to a triumphant finish with the Preupgrade Test Day on Thursday 2010-04-29 and the Xfce Test Day on Friday 2010-04-30.

OpenSolaris back on track.

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OS

blog.hydrasystemsllc: The acquisition of Sun by Oracle left a few projects in questionable states. It was unknown as to whether Oracle would continue supporting these open source projects. OpenSolaris was included in that list.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Oracle Desperate

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Security Leftovers

  • Friday's security updates
  • Judge Says The FBI Can Keep Its Hacking Tool Secret, But Not The Evidence Obtained With It
    Michaud hasn't had the case against him dismissed, but the government will now have to rely on evidence it didn't gain access to by using its illegal search. And there can't be much of that, considering the FBI had no idea who Michaud was or where he resided until after the malware-that-isn't-malware had stripped away Tor's protections and revealed his IP address. The FBI really can't blame anyone but itself for this outcome. Judge Bryan may have agreed that the FBI had good reason to keep its technique secret, but there was nothing preventing the FBI from voluntarily turning over details on its hacking tool to Michaud. But it chose not to, despite his lawyer's assurance it would maintain as much of the FBI's secrecy as possible while still defending his client. Judge Bryan found the FBI's ex parte arguments persuasive and declared the agency could keep the info out of Michaud's hands. But doing so meant the judicial playing field was no longer level, as he acknowledged in his written ruling. Fortunately, the court has decided it's not going to allow the government to have its secrecy cake and eat it, too. If it wants to deploy exploits with minimal judicial oversight, then it has to realize it can't successfully counter suppression requests with vows of silence.
  • Researcher Pockets $30,000 in Chrome Bounties
    Having cashed in earlier in May to the tune of $15,500, Mlynski pocketed another $30,000 courtesy of Google’s bug bounty program after four high-severity vulnerabilities were patched in the Chrome browser, each worth $7,500 to the white-hat hacker.