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Survey: Programmers shunning Vista for Mac OS and Linux

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cnn.com blogs: “Developers,” a VP at Electronic Arts once told me, explaining why there were so many me-too Windows applications, “will walk through the desert in their socks to get to an installed base.”

A Tale of Four Kernels

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spinellis.gr: The FreeBSD, GNU/Linux, Solaris, and Windows operating systems have kernels that provide comparable facilities. Interestingly, their code bases share almost no common parts, while their development processes vary dramatically. We analyze the source code of the four systems by collecting metrics in the areas of file organization, code structure, code style, the use of the C preprocessor, and data organization.

What’s wrong at OpenSolaris

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OS
  • What’s wrong at OpenSolaris

  • Linux shop adds Solaris for performance boost
  • OpenSolaris 2008.05, and other places the sun don't shine

You Can Hack An OS But You Can't Hack People - part 7: Left Standing at the Altar

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penguinpetes.com: Who's left standing at the altar? Windows users, that's who. Windows has now become the only proprietary operating system without a free-software or open-source equivalent. Apple has Darwin. Solaris has Open Solaris. Unix has Linux and BSD. And Windows has... nothing!

ReactOS no threat to Windows

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blogs.zdnet.com: ReactOS is an implementation of Windows Server 2003, still in alpha stage, and very interesting. But it is no threat to Windows. None at all. Especially compared with Linux. Here's why.

First look: OpenSolaris 2008.05 a work in progress

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arstechnica.com: The OpenSolaris project, which has been slowly gaining momentum over the past year, issued its first official release last week. Designed with an emphasis on usability and easy installation, OpenSolaris aims to provide a complete desktop platform for users and developers built on top of Sun's Solaris kernel. We have been testing OpenSolaris 2008.05 in order to see how it compares to modern Linux distributions like Ubuntu, Fedora, and OpenSUSE.

Best Computing Solutions: Windows vs. Linux

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osweekly.com: As long as there are choices in computing platforms, there will be those that claim that their OS is the best over all others. In this article, I will work to put my own preferences aside, examine my years of experience with past clients who have used all three major platforms and why each made the most sense for them.

OpenSolaris 2008.05: Not quite there

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techiemoe.com: This is one OS that pretty much came out of the blue. The last time I looked at Sun Microsystems' Solaris was waaay back when the only free option was Solaris "Express" beta builds.

OpenSolaris is here to stay

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blogbeebe.blogspot: I've never gotten angrier after reading a blog post like I did after read Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols' post "OpenSolaris Arrive just to Die". The crux of sjvn's argument is: Still, all that said, I think OpenSolaris could survive, and possibly even thrive, if it wasn’t for one sad, simple fact.

more on OpenSolaris 2008.05

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OS
  • OpenSolaris 2008.05: Notes from the field

  • OpenSolaris 2008.05 sucks big time
  • OpenSolaris: Nice, But Not There Yet
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Edubuntu Vs UberStudent: Return To College With The Best Linux Distro

Importantly, there are a handful of programs that are on Edubuntu that UberStudent doesn’t have, such as KAlgebra, Kazium, KGeography, and Marble. Instead, UberStudent has a smaller collection of applications but it does include some useful items when it comes to writing papers that Edubuntu does not have. So ultimately, Edubuntu includes more programs that are information-heavy, while UberStudent includes more tools that can aid students in their studies but doesn’t directly give them any sort of information. Read more

Zotac Nvidia Jetson TK1 review

The Jetson TK1, Nvidia’s first development board to be marketed at the general public, has taken a circuitous route to our shores. Unveiled at the company’s Graphics Technology Conference earlier this year, the board launched in the US at a headline-grabbing price of $192 but its international release was hampered by export regulations. Zotac, already an Nvidia partner for its graphics hardware, volunteered to sort things out and has partnered with Maplin to bring the board to the UK. In doing so, however, the price has become a little muddled. $192 – a clever dollar per GPU core – has become £199.99. Compared to Maplin’s other single-board computer, the sub-£30 Raspberry Pi, it’s a high-end item that could find itself priced out of the reach of the company’s usual customers. Read more

New Human Interface Guidelines for GNOME and GTK+

I’ve recently been hard at work on a new and updated version of the GNOME Human Interface Guidelines, and am pleased to announce that this will be ready for the upcoming 3.14 release. Over recent years, application design has evolved a huge amount. The web and native applications have become increasingly similar, and new design patterns have become the norm. During that period, those of us in the GNOME Design Team have worked with developers to expand the range of GTK+’s capabilities, and the result is a much more modern toolkit. Read more