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OpenSolaris 2008.11 tested

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OS

heise-online.co.uk: With its new version 2008.11, OpenSolaris makes further progress in terms of user friendliness, but also in terms of integrating the special Solaris features into a modern desktop environment.

OpenSolaris 2008.11: Its Time Is Coming

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reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: I was attracted to OpenSolaris 2008.11 in the first place by a couple of other internet articles. Solaris is a Unix-based operating system introduced by Sun Microsystems in 1992 as the successor to SunOS, and OpenSolaris is its Open Source spin-off.

OpenSolaris now on Toshiba laptops

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zdnet.com.au: Sun has reached an agreement with Toshiba to pre-install the OpenSolaris operating system on Toshiba laptops. The laptops will be available in the US from early 2009.

Will OpenSolaris 2008.11 Attract Linux Users?

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earthweb.com: This second OpenSolaris release comes with even more software packages than before, more hardware support, and a few nifty features revolving around ZFS. The question we cannot avoid is, “can it replace Linux?”

First Look: NexentaCore OS

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rcpmag.com: Recently, I read about NexentaCore, a new experimental operating system that seeks to merge the functionality of a Linux user environment with the OpenSolaris OS kernel, supporting the ZFS file system. I downloaded NexentaCore, currently at version 1.01, and tried it out using VirtualBox.

OpenSolaris as a file server

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heise-online.co.uk: A very fast SMB/CIFS server and the modern functionality of the ZFS file system make OpenSolaris a good choice when setting up a LAN file server.

Sun adds goodies to OpenSolaris 2008.11

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theregister.co.uk: Well, it may be December, but it is time for the OpenSolaris 2008.11 update, the second tweak of the open source variant of the Solaris Unix platform. With the new release today, it's getting some interesting storage enhancements as well as the usual update additions.

What's Open About OpenSolaris?

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Interviews

ddj.com: Timothy Cramer, senior director of OpenSolaris engineering at Sun, talks about the "open" part of OpenSolaris. DDJ: Tim, for clarity's sake, what are the basic differences between the Solaris 10 Operating System and OpenSolaris?

OpenSolaris tackles Ubuntu dominance

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zdnet.com.au: Sun has crafted the second release of OpenSolaris with a number of improvements in an attempt to make it more competitive with desktop-orientated Linux distributions such as Canonical's Ubuntu.

Is Symbian any good?

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blogs.zdnet.com: In all the talk about Nokia acquiring Symbian, setting up a foundation to support it and scouring the world for sales, one key question remains unanswered. Is the software any good?

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