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Linux Distro Spotlight: What I Love About elementary OS

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OS
Linux

Welcome back to "What I Love About X Linux Distro," a series that shines the spotlight on whatever Linux OS I've been tinkering with recently, and the features that distinguish it from the pack. It debuted with Ubuntu Budgie, but it won't come as a surprise that this time around I'm focusing on elementary OS 5.

Each article in this series will capture what I love most about a particular distro, and then you'll hear directly from one of its team members about why they love working on the project. Let's go!

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Tails 3.12 Anonymous OS Is Out with Linux 4.19, Tor Browser 8.0.5, and USB Image

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OS
Linux

Tails 3.12 is a stable release that comes as an incremental update to the previous version, Tails 3.10, adding numerous many updated components from the upstream Debian repositories, security vulnerabilities, as well as other exciting changes. But the biggest news is that Tails can now be downloaded as a USB image along the standard ISO image.

"In short, instead of downloading an ISO image (a format originally designed for CDs), you now download Tails as a USB image: an image of the data as it needs to be written to the USB stick," reads today's announcement. "We are still providing ISO images for people using DVDs or virtual machines. The methods for upgrading Tails remain the same."

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Debian-Based DebEX OS Now Shipping with Linux Kernel 5.0 and Budgie Desktop 10.4

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OS
Debian

DebEX Build 190128 is now available with the Budgie 10.4 desktop environment, and it's the first release of the GNU/Linux distribution to ship with the soon-to-be-released Linux 5.0 kernel. This release is based on the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series, which is currently available as Debian Testing.

The biggest news is the implementation of the Linux 5.0 kernel as Arne Exton took the risk to add a pre-release version into his DebEX operating system. Therefore, DebEX Build 190128 is using Linux kernel 5.0.0 RC3, which means that it shouldn't be installed on production systems.

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MakuluLinux Core OS Debuts With Impressive Desktop Design

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OS
Reviews

I have charted the progress of Core's development through sometimes daily ISO releases over the last few months. I can attest to the near constant revisions and design tweaks Raymer has applied.

The more I used Core, the better choice it became over its LinDoz and Flash kin. That, of course, is purely a personal observation. But the features I loved in the other two MakuluLinux options either were even better when integrated into Core, or were surpassed by the Core-only innovations.

MakuluLinux Core's rebuilt Xfce desktop is so well tweaked it looks and feels like something new.

Given the amount of forking Raymer did to Xfce, he could call the desktop something new. For me, referring to it as "the new Core desktop" makes perfect sense.

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Google Still Advancing Android Replacement

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OS
Android
Google
  • Apple veteran who worked on Mac for 14 years will help Google ‘kill’ Android

    Bill Stevenson is the engineer in question, who worked for Apple for 14 years. He’ll join Google in February, according to a LinkedIn post seen by 9to5Google. “I’m excited to share that this February I will be joining Google to help bring a new operating system called Fuchsia to market,” he said.

  • Google poaches 14-year Mac veteran from Apple to bring Fuchsia to market

    We learned in 2016 that Google was working on an entirely new operating system called Fuchsia. Development continues with new features and testing on a variety of form factors spotted regularly. Google has since hired 14-year Apple engineer Bill Stevenson to work on its upcoming OS, and help bring it to market.

Elementary OS: How I Learned To Stop Tweaking And Love The Workflow

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OS

During my first week using elementary OS I felt unusually confined. Shackled by things like no minimize button, no dark mode and no out-of-the-box way to add new themes. I'm always excited to learn new workflows and discover the less popular corners of a new operating system. I love being able to tweak and tweak and tweak. And then I realize I get buried in the customization, distracted by endless choice. My inability to do this immediately is elementary's biggest drawback to some -- and to others its biggest advantage.

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Parrot 4.5 Ethical Hacking OS Released with Metasploit 5.0, Drops 32-Bit Support

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OS
Linux

Parrot 4.5 is now available, powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.19 kernel series, preparing the project for the upcoming Parrot 5.0 LTS release. For future releases, Parrot Security plans to a support two kernels, stable kernel and a testing kernel.

Parrot 4.5 also comes with the latest Metasploit 5.0 penetration testing framework, which introduces major features like new evasion modules, a new search engine, a json-rpc daemon, integrated web services, and support for writting shellcode in C.

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Also: Parrot 4.5 release notes

GPU acceleration for Linux apps on Chrome OS enabled

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OS
Linux

It’s happening, and it’s happening early. GPU acceleration for Linux apps on Chrome OS has arrived. According to a recent report, Chromebooks with ‘Eve’ and ‘Nami’ baseboard should now, or very soon, be able to try GPU hardware acceleration.

GPU acceleration allows applications to fully leverage the GPU of a device to better run graphic-intensive tasks, like gaming. The feature will make for a much smoother Linux apps experience for Chromebook users.

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Review: Sculpt OS 18.09

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OS
Reviews

The Sculpt OS website suggests that the operating system is ready for day to day use, at least in some environments: "Sculpt is used as day-to-day OS by the Genode developers." Though this makes me wonder in what capacity the operating system runs on the machines of those developers. When I tried out the Haiku beta last year, the operating system had some limitations, but I could see how it could be useful to some people in environments with compatible hardware. In theory, I could browse the web, perform some basic tasks and develop software on Haiku.

With Sculpt though, I was unable to get the operating system to do anything, from a user's point of view. The small OS could download packages and load some of them into memory, and it could display a graph of related components. Sculpt could connect to my network and mount additional storage. All of this is good and a fine demo of the Genode design. However, I (as a user) was unable to interact with any applications, find a command line, or browse the file system. All of this put a severe damper on my ability to use Sculpt to do anything useful.

Genode, and by extension Sculpt OS, has some interesting design goals when it comes to security and minimalism. However, I don't think Sculpt is practical for any end-user tasks at this time.

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This Week in Linux, Chrome OS, and Death of Windows 10 Mobile

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OS
Linux
Microsoft
  • Episode 51 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we got some new announcements from Inkscape, Purism, Solus, Mozilla, and Steam. We’ll also check out some new Distro releases from Netrunner, Deeping, Android X86 and more. Then we’ll look at some new hardware offerings from Purism and Entroware. Later in the show will talk about some drama happening with a project’s licensing issues and then we’ll round out the episode with some Linux Gaming news including some sales from Humble Bundle. All that and much more!

  • Chrome OS 73 Dev Channel adds Google Drive, Play Files mount in Linux, USB device management and Crostini backup flag

    On Tuesday, Google released the first iteration of Chrome OS 73 for the Dev Channel and there are quite a few new items related to Project Crostini, for Linux app support. Some things in the lengthy changelog only set up new features coming soon while others add new functionality. Here’s a rundown on some of the Crostini additions to Chrome OS 73.

  • Tens to be disappointed as Windows 10 Mobile death date set: Doomed phone OS won't see 2020

    Microsoft has formally set the end date for support of its all-but-forgotten Windows 10 Mobile platform.

    The Redmond code factory said today that, come December 10, it's curtains for the ill-fated smartphone venture. The retirement will end a four-year run for a Microsoft phone effort that never really got off the ground and helped destroy Nokia in the process.

    "The end of support date applies to all Windows 10 Mobile products, including Windows 10 Mobile and Windows 10 Mobile Enterprise," Microsoft declared.

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More in Tux Machines

Excellent Utilities: lnav – the log file navigator

This is the second in a new series highlighting best-of-breed utilities. We’ll be covering a wide range of utilities including tools that boost your productivity, help you manage your workflow, and lots more besides. For this article, we’ll put lnav under the spotlight. lnav is a curses-based utility for viewing and analyzing log files. The software is designed to extract useful information from log files, making it easy to perform advanced queries. Think of lnav as an enhanced log file viewer. For many years system and kernel logs were handled by a utility called syslogd. Most Linux-based operating systems have since moved to systemd, which has a journal. That’s a giant log file for the whole system. Various software and services write their log entries into systemd’s journalctl. lnav can consume the JSON version of journalctl’s output. And it supports a wide range of other log formats. For systems running systemd-journald, you can also use lnav as the pager. We included a couple of log analyzers in our Essential System Tools feature. And lnav wouldn’t be totally out of place in that feature. lnav is optimized for small-scale deployments. Read more

Android Leftovers

Today in Techrights

Video/Audio: Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Edition, Open Source Security Podcast, This Week in Linux, Linux Gaming News Punch, Linux Action News, GNU World Order and Talk Python to Me

  • What’s New in Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Desktop Edition
    Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Edition is official Manjaro Linux flavour with Deepin Desktop Environment 15.8 as default desktop environment includes several deepin applications a free open source software. Manjaro 18.0 Deepin Edition is powered by the latest Long-Term Support of Linux Kernel 4.19, include pamac version 7.3. in manjaro 18.0, The Manjaro Settings Manager (MSM) now provides an easy-to-use graphical interface for installing and removing the many series of kernels. At the time of this release, eight kernel-series are available directly from manjaro binary repositories, from 3.16 series to the latest 4.19 release.
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 142 - Hypothetical security: what if you find a USB flash drive?
    Josh and Kurt talk about what one could do if you find a USB drive. The context is based on the story where the Secret Service was rumored to have plugged a malicious USB drive into a computer. The purpose of discussion is to explore how to handle a situation like this in the real world. We end the episode with a fantastic comparison of swim safety and security.
  • Episode 64 | This Week in Linux
    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we got a lot of releases week. Ubuntu and all of the Flavours have released 19.04 versions along with an interesting update from the Ubuntu derivative Pop!_OS. The KDE Community announced the availability of a bunch of new versions of various KDE Applications.
  • Linux Gaming News Punch - Episode 9
    Coming in hot (please save me from this heat) is the ninth episode of the Linux Gaming News Punch, your weekly round-up of some interesting bits of news. For regular readers, as always this might not be too helpful but for those who don't visit too often this should help keep you updated.
  • Linux Action News 102
    Ubuntu 19.04 is released we share our take, OpenSSH has an important release, and Mozilla brings Python to the browser. Also WebThings is launched and we think it might have a shot.
  • GNU World Order 13x17
  • Talk Python to Me: #208 Packaging, Making the most of PyCon, and more
    Are you going to PyCon (or a similar conference)? Join me and Kenneth Retiz as we discuss how to make the most of PyCon and what makes it special for each of us.