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Trouble at CopperheadOS

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OS
Android

LWN reviewed CopperheadOS, a security-enhanced Android distribution, in 2016. Unfortunately, the company behind CopperheadOS appears to have run into internal trouble; we don't dare venture a guess as to the specifics, even after watching the situation for a few days, beyond the fact that there is clearly a dispute between the founders.

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More on Devuan GNU/Linux 2.0

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OS
  • systemd-free Debian-based Devuan 2.0 ASCII has been released

    Debian based Devuan 2.0 has been released. Devuan doesn’t use systemd and the new release allows you to choose between SysVinit and OpenRC init systems.

  • Devuan ships second stable cut of its systemd-free Linux

    Systemd-free Linux distro Devuan has released its stable Version 2.0.

    The project's last release candidate was released in May, and as you'd hope, not much has changed between then and full release.

    Because it's written by purists, we should include the full name of the release: it's Devuan GNU+Linux 2.0 ASCII Stable.

  • Devuan GNU/Linux 2.0 "ASCII" Operating System Launches for Init Freedom Lovers

    Devuan, the open-source GNU/Linux distribution designed to offers users a stable, reliable, and free operating system that doesn't depend on the systemd init, has been updated to version 2.0.

    Continuing project's tradition to offer users alternatives to systemd and its components, Devuan GNU/Linux 2.0 is dubbed "ASCII" and it's based on the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series. It comes with a large variety of desktop environments, among which we can mention KDE, Xfce, Cinnamon, MATE, and LXQt.

    However, Devuan GNU/Linux 2.0 ships with Xfce as default desktop environment. Many other desktop environments are available after installation, and Devuan GNU/Linux's expert install mode lets users choose between the SysVinit and OpenRC init systems instead of systemd.

Devuan, Canonical and Ubuntu

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu
  • Devuan ships second stable cut of its systemd-free Linux

    Systemd-free Linux distro Devuan has released its stable Version 2.0.

    The project's last release candidate was released in May, and as you'd hope, not much has changed between then and full release.

    Because it's written by purists, we should include the full name of the release: it's Devuan GNU+Linux 2.0 ASCII Stable.

  • The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 531
  • Empowering developers to embrace Linux

     

    There is a huge opportunity for businesses to embrace new technologies and move their company forward. Open source and snaps are simple solutions, but ones that gives the most vital innovators in a business - developers - the tools they need to be confident in launching some of the world’s most utilised software.    

  • R 3.5.0 on Debian and Ubuntu: An Update

    R 3.5.0 was released a few weeks ago. As it changes some (important) internals, packages installed with a previous version of R have to be rebuilt. This was known and expected, and we took several measured steps to get R binaries to everybody without breakage.

    The question of but how do I upgrade without breaking my system was asked a few times, e.g., on the r-sig-debian list as well as in this StackOverflow question.

AsteroidOS 1.0 is a promising open-source smartwatch OS with plenty of room for improvement

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OS
GNU
Linux

Built entirely on GNU/Linux technologies, AsteroidOS offers a very basic, spartan experience. It features notification mirroring and a few apps like a calendar, calculator, and weather to get you by. In its current state, it's a neat project, but the best I can say for real-world use is that it works. When compared to watchOS, Wear OS, and Tizen, it has a very, very long way to go. Luckily, the developer knows this and has a few additions planned for future updates.

I've spent the better part of two weeks with AsteroidOS on my LG Watch Urbane as my primary smartwatch — the absolutely horrendous LG Watch Style battery life and being unable to pair my Gear S3 with my Pixel 2 XL on Android P DP2 certainly helped this period not feel so bad (no, I haven't tried DP3 yet). I don't mean to imply that AsteroidOS is a negative experience; it's just that it feels like several large steps backwards after what I've grown accustomed to in recent years.

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Sailfish OS 2.2.0 is now available for Jolla devices & Sailfish X

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OS
Linux

One of the biggest and most feature packed Sailfish OS updates is now available through early access on Jolla devices and Sailfish X! This update’s name is Mouhijoki, which is a river in Finland with roots from the lake Mouhijärvi. Mouhijoki is only 11,5 km long. It runs through farming field sceneries, with occasional cottages and saunas in Pirkanmaa area close to the city of Tampere.

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BSD Leftovers

Filed under
OS
BSD
  • OpenBSD on APU4

    Today I got an APU.4B4

    This is how I got OpenBSD installed on it.

  • libcsi - Crypto Simplified Interface
  • It’s UNIX. On A Microcontroller.

    It’s difficult to convey in an era when a UNIX-like operating system sits in your pocket, how there was once a time when the mere word was enough to convey an aura of immense computing power. If you ran UNIX, your computer probably filled a room, and you used it for Serious Stuff rather than just checking your Twitter feed. UNIX machines may still perform high-end tasks, but Moore’s Law has in the intervening years delivered upon its promise, and your phone with its UNIX-like OS is far more powerful than that room-sized minicomputer of the 1970s. A single chip for a few cents can do that job, which begs the question: just how little do we need to run UNIX today? It’s something [Joerg Wolfram] could advise you upon, because he’s got a functional UNIX running on a microcontroller.

Genode OS and ReactOS Progress

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OS
  • Release notes for the Genode OS Framework 18.05

    The driver behind the release 18.05 is the rapid evolution of the Sculpt general-purpose OS. Following the initial version from February, which was targeted at early adopters, the new Sculpt for The Curious (TC) introduces a much more welcoming and empowering user experience (Section Sculpt for The Curious).

  • Genode OS 18.05 Rolls Out Java Support, New NVMe Driver & Sculpt OS Update

    Version 18.05 of the Genode operating system framework is now available along with the second revision to its Sculpt OS, what desires to become a general purpose OS based upon Genode.

    The Sculpt operating system now has better customization abilities, support for hot-plugging of USB storage devices, support for NVMe devices now in addition to SATA, interactive WiFi configuration, UEFI boot support, and many other improvements.

  • ReactOS Is Finally Able To Build Itself

    ReactOS, the "open-source Windows" operating system re-implementation, is now able to finally self-host itself in fully compile ReactOS from ReactOS.

    ReactOS developer Pierre Schweitzer announced today that ReactOS is fully self-hosting.

CentOS Linux 7 Receives Important Kernel Security Update That Patches Six Flaws

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OS
Linux
Red Hat
Security

Being based on the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 operating system series, CentOS Linux 7 follows a rolling release model where the user installs once and receives regular updates forever. There's no need to reinstall your healthy CentOS Linux installation when a new release is out, but you should keep it up-to-date at all times.

A new kernel security update was released upstream by Red Hat for the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 operating system series, which addresses a total of six security vulnerabilities discovered and reported by various security researchers. The kernel security update is now also available for CentOS Linux 7 users.

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Flatcar Linux: The CoreOS Operating System Lives on Beyond Red Hat

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OS
Linux
Red Hat

As part of the integration between the product lines of the company that put containerized Linux on the map and the most powerful name in all of enterprise Linux, Red Hat has said it will adopt the “CoreOS” name for its forthcoming edition of its own Linux for containers. Yet although “Red Hat CoreOS” will adopt the self-updating technology that made CoreOS Inc.’s products competitive, a Red Hat official told The New Stack, the kernel will remain essentially compatible with the Fedora/Atomic/RHEL base it has already produced, for reasons the official said mainly concerned maintaining the certification of systems running on that kernel.

So while Red Hat makes plans for what to do with the CoreOS Container Linux, others are also eyeing the code base which after all, continues to be an open source project licensed under Apache 2.0. During the last KubeCon + CloudNativeCon in Copenhagen, attendees were re-introduced to Kinvolk, a Berlin-based group of open source contributors, including Chris Kühl, who were early contributors to the rkt container runtime devised at CoreOS and since donated to the CNCF. Now, Kühl and his colleagues have committed to producing and maintaining a fork of CoreOS Container Linux. Called Flatcar Linux, its immediate goal is to maintain its container-agnostic architecture, and maybe later try resuming its own development path.

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Android-Based RaspAnd OS for Raspberry Pi 3 Gets Bluetooth, Wi-Fi Improvements

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OS
Android
Linux

Coming almost half a year after the last release, which brought support for the official Raspberry Pi 7-inch touchscreen and smart TVs, RaspAnd Build 180529 remains based on the Android 7.1.2 Nougat mobile operating system but updates various components to their latest versions at the moment of writing.

Among these, we can mention Google Play Services 12.6.85 and Google Play store 10.1.08-all included in the GAPPS (Google Apps) package, Kodi 18.0 Alpha 2 media center, TeamViewer 13.1.8817, Jelly Browser 7.1.2, Aptoide TV 4.0.2, ES File Explorer 4.1.7.2, Chess 2.4.0, AIDA64 1.51, Termux 0.60, and Quick Reboot Pro 1.8.4.

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More in Tux Machines

LAS 2018

  • LAS 2018
    This month I was at my second Libre Application Summit in Denver. A smaller event than GUADEC but personally was my favorite conference so far. One of the main goals of LAS has been to be a place for multiple platforms to discuss the desktop space and not just be a GNOME event. This year two KDE members, @aleixpol and Albert Astals Cid, who spoke about release cycle of KDE Applications, Plasma, and the history of Qt. It is always interesting to see how another project solves the same problems and where there is overlap. The elementary folks were there since this is @cassidyjames home turf who had a great “It’s Not Always Techincal” talk as well as a talk with @danrabbit about AppCenter which are both very important areas the GNOME Project needs to improve in. I also enjoyed meeting a few other community members such as @Philip-Scott and talk about their use of elementary’s platform.
  • Developer Center Initiative – Meeting Summary 21st September
    Since last blog post there’s been two Developer Center meetings held in coordination with LAS GNOME Sunday the 9th September and again Friday the 21st September. Unfortunately I couldn’t attend the LAS GNOME meeting, but I’ll cover the general progress made here.

The "Chinese EPYC" Hygon Dhyana CPU Support Still Getting Squared Away For Linux

Back in June is when the Linux kernel patches appeared for the Hygon Dhyana, the new x86 processors based on AMD Zen/EPYC technology licensed by Chengdu Haiguang IC Design Co for use in Chinese data-centers. While the patches have been out for months, they haven't reached the mainline kernel quite yet but that might change next cycle. The Hygon Dyhana Linux kernel patches have gone through several revisions and the code is mostly adapting existing AMD Linux kernel code paths for Zen/EPYC to do the same on these new processors. While these initial Hygon CPUs appear to basically be re-branded EPYC CPUs, the identifiers are different as rather than AMD Family 17h, it's now Family 18h and the CPU Vendor ID is "HygonGenuine" and carries a new PCI Express device vendor ID, etc. So the different areas of the kernel from CPUFreq to KVM/Xen virtualization to Spectre V2 mitigations had to be updated for the correct behavior. Read more

Good Support For Wayland Remote Desktop Handling On Track For KDE Plasma 5.15

The KDE Plasma 5.15 release due out next year will likely be in good shape for Wayland remote desktop handling. The KDE Plasma/KWin developers have been pursuing Wayland remote desktop support along a similar route to the GNOME Shell camp by making use of PipeWire and the XDG-Desktop-Portal. Bits are already in place for KDE Plasma 5.13 and the upcoming 5.14 release, but for the 5.15 release is now where it sounds like the support may be in good shape for end-users. Read more

Linux developers threaten to pull “kill switch”

Linux powers the internet, the Android in your pocket, and perhaps even some of your household appliances. A controversy over politics is now seeing some of its developers threatening to withdraw the license to all of their code, potentially destroying or making the whole Linux kernel unusable for a very long time. Read more