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Elementary OS 0.3 Freya Beta 2 : Video Overview and Screenshot Tours

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OS
OSS

Elementary OS 0.3 Freya Beta 2 has been released by Elementary OS Team, based on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and featuring with pantheon desktop environment, it comes with various User Interface improvements, UEFI/SecureBoot support, better and more discoverable multitasking, updated 3rd party apps (including Geary, Simple Scan, Document Viewer & more), Updated development libraries (including Gtk 3.14), Security and Stability improvements, tons of stylesheet and icon changes and fixes along with other interesting changes as well as almost 600 bug fixes.

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Proxmox VE (Virtual Environment) 3.4 OS Is Based on Debian Wheezy 7.8

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OS
Debian

Proxmox Server Solutions GmbH proudly announced on February 19, 2015, the immediate availability of version 3.4 of its powerful, open-source, and reliable server virtualization management computer operating system, Proxmox Virtual Environment (VE). The release brings a number of new features and improvements, including NUMA support (non-uniform memory access), ZFS storage plug-in, hotplug support, as well as the latest and greatest ZFS file system.

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Frugalware 2.0 (Rigel) released

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OS

The Frugalware Developer Team is pleased to announce the immediate availability of Frugalware 2.0, our twentieth stable release.
No new features have been added since 2.0rc2. If you didn't follow the changes during the rc releases, here are the most important changes since 1.9 in no particular order:

Package updates:
Linux kernel 3.14.19
Xorg server 1.15.2
KDE 4.14.3
GNOME 3.12.2
Xfce 4.10.1
LXDE 0.99.0
LibreOffice 4.3.3.2
Mozilla Firefox 35.0.1
Chromium browser 39.0.2171.96
New features:
MATE 1.8.1

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ChaletOS Distro Comes with a February 2015 Release - Screenshot Tour

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OS
GNU
Linux

Dejan Petrovic, the developer of the recently introduced ChaletOS computer operating system informed us today, February 12, that he just pushed a February 2015 release on his servers, urging users to update to it as soon as possible. The new ISO images are available for download right now (see link at the end of the article) for 32 and 64-bit PCs, bringing assorted bugfixes and improvements.

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Elive 2.5.4 Beta Debian-Based Distribution Now Supports PPA-style Repositories

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OS
Debian

The Elive Team proudly announced the immediate availability for download and testing of a new Beta version of their Elive computer operating system, based on the highly acclaimed Debian GNU/Linux distribution.

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Firefox OS dongle redesign to add quad-core SoC, DRM

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OS
Moz/FF

The Firefox OS-based “Matchstick” media player has been delayed a half year to August, and will receive an overhaul to move to a quad-core SoC and add DRM.

The Matchstick was one of the biggest Kickstarter success stories of 2014, finishing its funding run in October with $470,310, almost five times Mathstick.tv’s $100,000 goal. The developer edition of the $25, open-spec HDMI stick — and the first Firefox OS media player — appears to have shipped, and the device was set to go out this month to the other backers, who paid as little as $18.

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After Android: Ubuntu, Xiaomi, Meizu or Tencent?

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OS

It would be something of an understatement to say that the smartphone market is hot: it has clearly taken over from the desktop sector as the mainstream that defines the direction of computing. That's good news for open source, since it means Windows is increasingly irrelevant as far as the future is concerned. Android, of course, is dominating this sector, but nothing stays still: there will, one day, be an "after Android" - so who will be the key player(s) there?

Not, I fear, Tizen. Although to begin with I hoped this might develop into a strong alternative to Android, that is clearly not to be. I've not written much about it here, since it seems to spend most of its time merging with other projects and re-branding itself. This article has an excellent representation of how Tizen has evolved over the years; it also reviews the first Tizen phone, from Samsung, concluding.

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4MLinux Allinone Edition 11.1 Beta Now Ready for Testing

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OS
Linux

4MLinux Allinone Edition, a Linux operating system built from scratch that wants to provide a complete desktop experience and manage to keep the size to a minimum, has reached version 11.1 Beta.

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Ozon OS Gets GTK+ Theme Update, Still No Release Date for This Beautiful OS

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OS
Red Hat

Ozon is a new OS in the making that uses a custom shell called Atom ES. It's based on Fedora and it looks like the developers are making some great progress with it.

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Bodhi Linux 3.0.0 to Be Out Soon, Features a Cool and Light Enlightenment Desktop

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OS
Ubuntu

Bodhi is a Linux operating system based on Ubuntu that has a minimalist approach and really low system requirements. A second Release Candidate has been released by Jeff Hoogland, the leader of the project.

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KDE and GNOME: Kubuntu Site, Marble Maps, Kube in Randa, and UX in GNOME

  • Call for design: Artful Banner for Kubuntu.org website
    Kubuntu 17.10 — code-named Artful Aardvark — will be released on October 19th, 2017. We need a new banner for the website, and invite artists and designers to submit designs to us based on the Plasma wallpaper and perhaps the mascot design.
  • Randa 2017 Report – Marble Maps
    Just came back home yesterday from Randa Meetings 2017. This year, even though my major motive for the sprint was to use Qt 5.8’s Qt Speech module instead of custom Java for text-to-speech during navigation, that could not be achieved because of a bug which made the routes not appear in the app in the first place. And this bug is reproducible both by using latest code, and old-enough code, and is even there in the prod app in the Google Play Store itself. So, although most of my time had gone in deep-diving on the issue, unfortunately I was not able to find the root-cause to it eventually. I will need to pick up on that in the coming weeks again when I get time, to get it fixed.
  • Kube in Randa
    I’ve spent the last few days with fellow KDE hackers in beautiful Randa in the Swiss Mountains. It’s an annual event that focuses on a specific topic every year, and this time accessibility was up, so Michael and me made our way up here to improve Kube in that direction (and to enjoy the scenic surroundings of course).
  • Usability testing for early-stage software prototypes
    In this article, Ciarrai Cunneen and I describe how to do a paper-based usability test, using an early redesign of the GNOME Settings app as an example. The updated Settings features in GNOME 3.26, released on September 13. When writing open source software, we often obsess about making our logic elegant and concise, coming up with clever ways to execute tasks and demonstrate ideas. But we sometimes forget a key fact: Software is not useful if it is not easy to use. To make sure our programs can be used by our intended audience, we need usability testing. Usability is basically asking the question, "Can people easily use this thing?" or "Can real people use the software to do real tasks in a reasonable amount of time?" Usability is crucial to the creative process of building anything user-based. If real people can't use our software, then all the hard work of creating it is pointless. [...] In early 2016, GNOME decided to make a major UI update to its Settings application. This visual refresh shifts from an icon-based menu to drop-down lists and adds important changes to several individual Settings panels. The GNOME design team wanted to test these early-stage design changes to see how easily real people could navigate the new GNOME Settings application. Previously, GNOME relied on traditional usability tests, where users explore the software's UI directly. But this wouldn't work, since the software updates hadn't been completed.

FSF, GNU and FSFE

  • LibrePlanet 2018: Let's talk about Freedom. Embedded.
    The call for sessions is open now, until November 2nd, 2017. General registration and exhibitor and sponsor registration are also open. Pre-order a LibrePlanet 10th anniversary t-shirt when you register to attend! Do you want to discuss or teach others about a topic relevant to the free software community? You've got until Thursday, November 2nd, 2017 at 10:00 EDT (14:00 UTC) to submit your session proposals. LibrePlanet is an annual conference for free software enthusiasts and everyone who cares about the intersection of technology and social justice. For the past nine years, LibrePlanet has brought together free software developers, policy experts, activists, hackers, students, and people who are at the beginning of their free software journeys. LibrePlanet 2018 will feature programming for all ages and experience levels.
  • LibrePlanet free software conference celebrates 10th anniversary, CFP and registration open now
    The call for proposals is open now, until November 2, 2017. General registration and exhibitor and sponsor registration are also open. LibrePlanet is an annual conference for free software enthusiasts and anyone who cares about the intersection of technology and social justice. For the past nine years, LibrePlanet has brought together free software developers, policy experts, activists, hackers, students, and people who are at the beginning of their free software journeys. LibrePlanet 2018 will feature programming for all ages and experience levels.
  • dot-zed extractor
  • FSFE Newsletter - September 2017

    To push our demand, the FSFE launched a new campaign last week: "Public Money Public Code". The campaign explains the benefits of releasing publicly funded Software under free licences with a short inspiring video and an open letter to sign. Furthermore, the campaign and the open letter will be used in the coming months until the European Parliament election in 2019 to highlight good and bad examples of publicly funded software development and its potential reuse.

  • Free Software Foundation Europe Leads Call For Taxpayer-Funded Software To Be Licensed For Free Re-use
    Considered objectively, it's hard to think of any good reasons why code that is paid for by the public should not be released publicly as a matter of course. The good news is that this "public money, public code" argument is precisely the approach that open access advocates have used with considerable success in the field of academic publishing, so there's hope it might gain some traction in the world of software too.

Security: WordPress 4.8.2, CCleaner 5.33, Apache Patch and Cryptocurrencies

  • WordPress 4.8.2 Security and Maintenance Release
    WordPress 4.8.2 is now available. This is a security release for all previous versions and we strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately.
  • Attack on CCleaner Highlights the Importance of Securing Downloads and Maintaining User Trust
    Some of the most worrying kinds of attacks are ones that exploit users’ trust in the systems and softwares they use every day. Yesterday, Cisco’s Talos security team uncovered just that kind of attack in the computer cleanup software CCleaner. Download servers at Avast, the company that owns CCleaner, had been compromised to distribute malware inside CCleaner 5.33 updates for at least a month. Avast estimates that over 2 million users downloaded the affected update. Even worse, CCleaner’s popularity with journalists and human rights activists means that particularly vulnerable users are almost certainly among that number. Avast has advised CCleaner Windows users to update their software immediately. This is often called a “supply chain” attack, referring to all the steps software takes to get from its developers to its users. As more and more users get better at bread-and-butter personal security like enabling two-factor authentication and detecting phishing, malicious hackers are forced to stop targeting users and move “up” the supply chain to the companies and developers that make software. This means that developers need to get in the practice of “distrusting” their own infrastructure to ensure safer software releases with reproducible builds, allowing third parties to double-check whether released binary and source packages correspond. The goal should be to secure internal development and release infrastructure to that point that no hijacking, even from a malicious actor inside the company, can slip through unnoticed.
  • Apache bug leaks contents of server memory for all to see—Patch now
    There's a bug in the widely used Apache Web Server that causes servers to leak pieces of arbitrary memory in a way that could expose passwords or other secrets, a freelance journalist has disclosed. The vulnerability can be triggered by querying a server with what's known as an OPTIONS request. Like the better-known GET and POST requests, OPTIONS is a type of HTTP method that allows users to determine which HTTP requests are supported by the server. Normally, a server will respond with GET, POST, OPTIONS, and any other supported methods. Under certain conditions, however, responses from Apache Web Server include the data stored in computer memory. Patches are available here and here.
  • The Pirate Bay Takes Heat for Testing Monero Mining
    Cryptocurrencies usually are mined with CPU power initially, she told LinuxInsider. Users then find ways to speed up the hashing before going to GPU. They build specialized hardware and field programmable gate array (FPGA) chips to carry out the hashing function in order to mine much faster. [...] The notion that The Pirate Bay effectively would borrow resources from its own users is not the problem, suggested Jessica Groopman, principal analyst at Tractica.