Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OS

DARPA joins math-secured microkernel race

Filed under
OS
OSS

In a discussion that will sound familiar to Australian readers, US military development agency DARPA wants to create provably-secure software.

According to Threatpost, DARPA director Arati Prabhakar told a Washington Post security conference that embedded systems are among the kinds of applications for which it's feasible to create such OSs.

[...]

In July of this year, NICTA open-sourced the code for its seL4 microkernel, identifying DARPA among the software's users.

Read more

elementary OS: Don't Hate Me Because I'm Beautiful

Filed under
OS

Ubuntu is a very popular base and it's used by too many systems to count. Ubuntu itself is based on Debian, but for now we’ll stick with Ubuntu. elementary was not supposed to be an operating system, and in fact it started its life just as a collection of themes and a few other packages that allowed users to make Ubuntu look different.

The developers soon realized that they could do better than this and made their own operating system. Only two versions of it have been released until now, Jupiter and Luna. They are now working on a third one called Freya, which is in the Beta stages. What is happening with this incredible rate of adoption for this OS and why is it so popular?

Read more

CentOS 5.11 Officially Released, Probably the Last One in the Series

Filed under
OS
Red Hat

As you all know already, CentOS is an Enterprise-class Linux Distribution derived from sources provided by Red Hat. This is the eleventh update for the distribution and probably the last one. It features all the packages from all variants, including Server and Client, and the upstream repositories have been merged into a single one.

Red Hat announced less than a month ago the release of their last update for Red Hat Enterprise Linux, 5.11. It stands to reason that CentOS 5.11 will also be the last update in the series.

Read more

Chromecast getting competition from Firefox OS-powered Matchstick

Filed under
OS
Moz/FF

The streaming stick market is apparently heating up. Google, Microsoft, and Amazon all have entrants in this space, and if a new Kickstarter appeal succeeds, there will soon be a Firefox OS stick getting in on the action.
Inspired by the Chromecast, the Matchstick will plug into your TV using HDMI, connect to devices locally using Wi-Fi, and be used as a streaming media platform. Unlike Chromecast, however, Matchstick will use the open source Firefox OS as its base, making it readily accessible to developers who will be able to build HTML apps for Matchstick that leverage open Web technologies.

Read more

Knoppix 7.4.1 Is Now Available For Download

Filed under
OS
Debian

Knoppix developers have released a major version of their operating system Knoppix 7.4.1 based on the usual picks from Debian stable (wheezy) and newer Desktop packages from Debian/testing and Debian/unstable (jessie). According to the official release note, this distro version uses kernel 3.16.2 and xorg 7.7 (core 1.16.0) for supporting current computer hardware.

Read more

Webconverger 26 Is a Secure Kiosk OS That Doesn't Store Any Data

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux

Webconverger is a distribution designed and developed with a single goal in mind, namely to provide the best Kiosk experience possible. This means that people will be able to use that OS as a regular system, although its functionality will be limited and it will be impossible to install any other apps.

This is a very helpful solution if this is a public PC, like in a library or a cafe, and it preserves the quality of the installation for a very long time. Because users can't interact with it on a deeper level, the operating system will remain stable and it will be pretty much the same like in the first day that it was used.

Read more

ChromeOS vs Linux: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Filed under
OS
Google

Anyone who believes Google isn't "making a play" for desktop users isn't paying attention. In recent years, I've seen ChromeOS making quite a splash on the Google Chromebook. Exploding with popularity on sites such as Amazon.com, it looks as if ChromeOS could be unstoppable.

In this article, I'm going to look at ChromeOS as a concept to market, how it's affecting Linux adoption and whether or not it's a good/bad thing for the Linux community as a whole. Plus, I'll talk about the biggest issue of all and how no one is doing anything about it.

Read more

MINIX 3.3.0 is Available Now

Filed under
OS

In 2008, the European Research Council awarded Prof. Andrew S. Tanenbaum, the designer of MINIX, an Advanced Grant of €2.5 million (about $3.2 million) to produce a reliable operating system. He and his team have been working on it hard since then and they are now proud to release the result as a free and open-source operating system for the PC and ARM. It comes with a BSD license, meaning that individuals and companies can use it in products without paying royalties and without being required to disclose any changes they make to competitors.

MINIX 1 was originally a system aimed at teaching operating systems but after the ERC grant, the focus changed to include producing a solid, commercially viable product as well. The new version, MINIX 3.3.0, has a number of key features.

Read more

Operating System U: A new Linux based OS with a firm focus on you the user and functionality over UI overhauls, hits KickStarter

Filed under
OS
Linux

There's isn't probably a piece of software that is as hated as Windows 8's Metro UI. Some seasoned Windows enthusiasts like it, but most of the normal day-to-day user had a hard time getting used to it. Operating System U is being readied with the regular user in mind, and is based on Manjaro Linux. A quick overview of the project.

Read more

Cumulus Networks Partners for Open Source Networking OS

Filed under
OS
Linux
OSS

Cumulus Networks, which develops Cumulus Linux, describes its product as "the industry's first, full-featured Linux operating system for networking hardware." That's a debatable claim, mostly because "full-featured" is a term that may be interpreted in myriad ways, and because Linux-based operating systems tailored for networking hardware have been around in various forms for decades. But with a focus on hardware-agnosticism and a commitment to supporting a broad range of applications, all while maintaining a Debian Linux-based platform that is not watered-down to the bare essentials, Cumulus is doing some new things in an old niche.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Distributions News: Ubuntu, Manjaro, and Lakka

  • Ubuntu founder retakes the CEO throne, many employees gone
    Mark Shuttleworth, the founder of Canonincal has once again returned to his positition of CEO, as Jane Silber, the previous CEO now heads to the Board of Directors; and big changes happen to the staff lineup as a result. In a blog bost by Sibler, she says, “I originally agreed to be CEO for 5 years and we’ve extended my tenure as CEO by a couple of years already. We’ve been preparing for a transition for some time by strengthening the executive leadership team and maturing every aspect of the company, and earlier this year Mark and I decided that now is the time to effect this transition.”
  • [Video] Manjaro 17.0 KDE Edition - See What’s New
    Manjaro 17.0 KDE is the latest release of Manjaro Linux. This release brings new KDE Plasma 5.9.x as desktop environment include the most of KDE applications 16.12 and KDE Frameworks 5.32.
  • Make your own NES Classic Edition with Lakka 2.0 LibreELEC Linux distro and Raspberry Pi
    The NES Classic Edition is a very fun nostalgia-based gaming console. As someone who grew up with Nintendo, I knew I wanted the mini system as soon as it was announced. A family member was able to score me one on launch day, and I've been very happy with it. Unfortunately, other people have not been so lucky. Supply was very limited and it has since been discontinued. If you do not already have it, you are sort of out of luck without paying high prices on eBay or Craigslist. If you are only looking to replay the NES games of your youth, and you are OK with doing it in an unofficial way, emulation is another route. In fact, if you'd rather not play these games on your PC, you can instead use a Linux-based operating system and a Raspberry Pi (or other devices) hooked to a television. One such distro is Lakka, which just reached version 2.0. It is arguably better than an NES Classic Edition as it can also play games from other systems, such as SNES, Sega Genesis, Nintendo 64, PlayStation 1, and many more.

Software: Monitoring Tools, VSXu, and FSearch

today's howtos

Linux Mint's Plans

  • Some Of The Features Coming To Linux Mint's Cinnamon 3.4 Desktop
    In the latest monthly progress report on Linux Mint, some of the upcoming changes for the GNOME3-forked Cinnamon Desktop Environment were shared.
  • Monthly News – April 2017
    Many thanks to all the people who donated to us and who help to fund our project. Donations are down to about 60% of what they were last year, but they’re still quite high. In the first trimesters of 2015, 2016 and 2017 we respectively received $23k, $40k and $25k. Our development team has gotten bigger and our budget is being extended to include some administrators and designers. Other figures and metrics indicate we’re growing so this probably just reflects an exceptional year for donations in 2016.
  • Linux Mint Is Adopting LightDM as its Login Manager
    Linux Mint is adopting the LightDM display manager to handle and authenticate user sessions. Revealing plans in its latest monthly update, Mint says it will formally drop the MDM Display Manager (MDM) in favour of LightDM with Mint 18.2, release date for which is as-yet unknown. The popular Ubuntu-based Linux distribution mooted a possible switch earlier this year, noting that it had a key feature MDM lacks (guest sessions), and has become something of a standard across distributions.
  • Linux Mint 13 support ends, LMDE to get MATE 1.18 soon, big changes heading to Cinnamon
    The news from the Linux Mint team was quite interesting this week. First up, Linux Mint 13 has officially hit EOL (end of life), so you really do need to upgrade. LMDE (Linux Mint Debian Edition) is set to get the MATE desktop version 1.18 "this week" and they have ported mintMenu over to GTK3, since the rest of MATE is now using GTK3 too it makes sense.