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Linux versus Windows: the eternal discussion

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celettu.wordpress: Yesterday I got dragged into a “Windows versus Linux” discussion, because on my Facebook profile I had made a quiz, and one of the questions was “What OS do I use?”. My sister in law got that one wrong, and exlaimed “Stupid Linux!”.

Does the Mac-Windows-Linux Race Ever Change?

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earthweb.com: I’ve been on a history kick lately, inspired by the fact that the foundation of the Unix operating system was created just 40 years ago this summer, starting with software written by Ken Thompson at Bell Laboratories.

OpenSolaris: how long will it be with us?

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itwire.com: OpenSolaris came out with its third release last week and within a year there seems to have been some pretty good progress. The biggest question hanging over OpenSolaris is whether Oracle will decide to continue the project.

OpenSolaris 2009.06: Getting Better All The Time

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blogs.zdnet.com: The June 2009 (2009.06) release of OpenSolaris provides a solid Open Source GNOME desktop experience like that of a modern Linux distribution combined with the scalability and stability of UNIX.

OpenSolaris 2009.06 Live CD

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blogbeebe.blogspot: I downloaded and booted the LiveCD version of OpelSolaris 20009.6, more for consistency than anything else I suppose. Is this version fit to challenge Linux?

StormOS Enters Beta

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phoronix.com: A beta version of StormOS has emerged, which is a desktop distribution that is based upon the Nexenta Core Platform that in turn is derived from OpenSolaris but with an Ubuntu user-land.

OpenSolaris Still Shines

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informationweek.com/blog: With all the gloom-and-doom about Sun in the air, it almost went unnoticed that they have a new rev of OpenSolaris out in the wild. I took a quick end-user-experience peek.

40 years of Unix

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  • Timeline: 40 years of Unix

  • Unix turns 40: The past, present and future of a revolutionary OS
  • On the shoulders of giants: Three Unix movers and shakers
  • The Unix family tree
  • Survey: Unix has a long and healthy future, say users

Linux, Android Linux, and Windows 7 Go to War

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linuxplanet.com: Not all that along ago, I was hearing rumors that the release of Windows 7 will spell the death of Linux on tiny notebook type computers called netbooks. Despite netbooks not requiring the Windows OS desktop Linux remains largely unknown.

OpenSolaris 2009.06 Performance

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phoronix.com: The 2009.06 release introduced better codec support, SPARC support, improved hardware support, numerous enhancements to the Image Packaging System, and plenty of other changes. Today though we are here with some benchmarks.

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Today in Techrights

Initial impressions of PCLinuxOS 2014.08

I spend more time looking at the family trees of Linux distributions than I do looking at my own family tree. I find it interesting to see how distributions grow from their parent distribution, either acting as an extra layer of features which regularly re-bases itself or as a separate fork. New distributions usually tend to remain similar in most ways to their parent distro, using the same package manager and maintaining similar philosophies. When I look at the family trees of Linux distributions one project stands out more than others: PCLinuxOS. Read more