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Fragmentation and What it Means

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Software “Building web apps is not getting easier. The fragmentation of operating systems and browsers is getting worse, not better.” With a few caveats, the above statement is obviously true.

11 OSes that Tried (and failed) to Take Down Windows

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OS Believe it or not, Microsoft’s Windows is 25 years old - which is certianly making some of us feel old. Despite a few ups and downs, growing pains, and BSODs, Windows has survived the test of time and continues to reign as one of the most popular operating systems available today. Of course that’s not to say there haven’t been other operating systems over the years that tried to steal the crown.

Oracle releases Solaris 11 Express

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OS This version of the OS can be used for testing and development only and includes network virtualization capabilities

Also: Oracle responds to Apache Java defiance

Jolicloud's OS Isn't Just Similar to Chrome OS--Looks Like It Will Run With It

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OS Like Chrome OS, the Jolicloud OS is focused entirely on managing cloud-based applications as opposed to local ones (see the screenshot below). Its other similarity to Chrome OS is that it is squarely aimed at the netbook market.

Does the Operating System Still Matter? Part 4

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OS Never in recent memory has there been less focus on the operating system, a subject we examine periodically. We see this qualitiatively, as the nature of our engagement shifts to the layers above, below and around the operating system.

What Operating Systems are Developers Using?

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OS Ian Skerrett of Eclipse asserted that, according to Eclipse’s community survey data, Mac had fallen behind Linux as an operating system of choice for developers. Rolling up their numbers, I get the following distribution of operating systems:

Surviving Mac, Windows, Linux on daily basis

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linuxevangelist.blogspot: I am a Linux, Mac & Windows user and I use them on daily basis. I use Linux for all my personal works, Windows at my Office and Mac on the move [since I bought it at high premium].

Ten annoying operating system failings

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OS There's no denying that every operating system has its own little foibles, but some shortcomings are more infuriating than others, says Jack Wallen.

5 Operating Systems Making Big Waves This Week

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OS It's been a busy week for operating systems (OSes). Here's a rundown of what happened and the implications.

OpenIndiana Picks up Where OpenSolaris Left off

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OS For those disappointed by Oracle's decision to discontinue supporting a free version of its Solaris Unix-like operating system, a new alternative emerged to take its place.

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Huawei Watch Review: Best Android Wear Smartwatch Available

The Huawei Watch currently offers the best option on the Android Wear platform. The Huawei Watch looks elegant and offers great design as well as multiple attractive style options depending on the buyer’s cash flow. Even iPhone owners can take a look. If an iPhone owner prefers a stainless steel round watch, then the Huawei Watch is a usable option at a lower price than the Stainless Steel Apple Watch. Android Wear works well on iPhone, but does not give users the same level of integration. The most important features work fine, including notifications and fitness tracking. We give the Huawei Watch a hearty recommendation. It is worth paying a little more for this attractive and well-designed Android Wear smartwatch. Read more

Linux Kernel 4.1.10 LTS Is Now Available for Download with Networking Fixes

After announcing the release of the Linux 4.2.3 kernel, Greg Kroah-Hartman has informed the world today, October 3, about the release and immediate availability for download of the tenth maintenance version of the Linux 4.1 LTS kernel series. Read more Also: Linux 4.3-rc4 Kernel Released: Adds A New & Better String Copy Function Linus Torvalds Announces Linux Kernel 4.3 RC4 on the Eve of the Project's 24th Birthday

How Debian managed the systemd transition

Debian's decision to move to systemd as the default init system was a famously contentious (and rather public) debate. Once all the chaos regarding the decision itself had died down, however, it was left to project members to implement the change. At DebConf 2015 in Heidelberg, Martin Pitt and Michael Biebl gave a down-to-earth talk about how that implementation work had gone and what was still ahead. Pitt and Biebl are the current maintainers of the systemd package in Debian, with Pitt also maintaining the corresponding Ubuntu package. The pair began with a brief recap of the init-replacement story, albeit one that steered mercifully clear of the quarrels and stuck to the technical side. Initial discussions for replacing the System V init system began as far back as 2007, but pressure grew in recent years, included considerable demand from system administrators and upstream projects (typically wanting specific features like support for logind or journald). Once the Technical Committee had made its decision to adopt systemd as the default, Pitt said, "the real work" began. Read more (paywalled before)

Linux 4.3-rc4

You all know the drill by now. It's Sunday, and there is a new release candidate out there. Things look fairly normal. We have noticeably fewer commits than rc3 (which was fairly big), and I don't see anything unusually alarming. The statistics look pretty normal too: just under half of the patch is drivers (drm continues to be noticeable, but there's infiniband, mmc, input layer etc). About a quarter is arch updates (m68k, MIPS, x86) and the final quarter is solidly "misc" (doc updates, tools, scripts, scheduler, mm..). The appended shortlog gives a flavor of the details. Linus Read more