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ReactOS 0.4.10 released

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OS

The ReactOS project is pleased to announce the release of version 0.4.10, the latest of our quarterly cadence of releases. The project has seen an increasing emphasis on consistency and stability over the past few months, an emphasis the rapid release schedule helps reinforce to provide a better end-user experience. Even as new pieces of functionality are added, all this would be for naught if a user could not access them reliably.

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Qubes OS 4.0.1-rc1 has been released!

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OS
Security

We expect that there will be a second release candidate (4.0.1-rc2) following this one (4.0.1-rc1). The second release candidate will include a fix for the Nautilus bug reported in #4460 along with any other available fixes for bugs reported against this release candidate.

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Also: Fedora Community Blog: FAW 2018 Day 1: “Community makes the difference”

Feren OS Delivers Richer Cinnamon Flavor

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OS
Reviews

Feren OS is a popular replacement for Linux Mint. It is speedy and has enough developer differences to make using it interesting and fun. From a practical viewpoint, Feren OS does a nice job of improving on the core Linux Mint Cinnamon experience.

Feren OS is a nearly flawless Linux computing platform. This distro is practically maintenance-free. The developers have taken the best parts of several innovative Linux distros and seamlessly integrated them into an ideal computing platform.

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Braiins OS Is The First Fully Open Source, Linux-based Bitcoin Mining System

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OS
GNU
Linux

Braiins Systems, the company behind the Slush Pool, has announced Braiins OS. The creators of this bitcoin mining software have claimed that it’s the world’s first fully open source system for cryptocurrency embedded devices.

The initial release of the operating system is based on OpenWrt, which is basically a Linux operating system for embedded devices. You can find its code here.

Those who know about OpenWrt must be aware of the fact that it’s very versatile. As a result, Braiins OS can also be extended in different applications in future.

In a Medium post, Braiins Systems has said that different weird cases of non-standard behavior of mining devices cause tons of issues. With this new mining software, the company wishes to make things easier for mining pool operators and miners.

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Also: Linux Lite 4.2 Final Released

Sailfish 3 is here!

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OS
Linux

I’m happy to share with you that we have today released the first Sailfish 3 software release, and made it available for all Sailfish users who have opted-in for the early access updates. Further, we are expanding the Sailfish community program, “Sailfish X“, with a few of key additions next week: on November 8 we release the software for various Sony Xperia XA2 models.

Sailfish OS has matured to its third generation, Sailfish 3, which now fully packetizes the offering for multitude of corporate solutions. In line with the regional licensing strategy, Sailfish 3 has a deeper level of security making it a solid option for various corporate and organizational solutions, and other use cases. New enhanced features include e.g. Mobile Device Management (MDM), fully integrated VPN solutions, enterprise WiFi, data encryption, and better and faster performance. For daily users Sailfish 3 brings essentially better performance, deepened security, and smoother user experience.

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Jolla Releases Sailfish 3.0 Mobile Linux Operating System

Solus Readies KDE Plasma Edition Testing ISO with Latest KDE Plasma 5.14 Desktop

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OS
KDE

After giving us the feature-rich and luxurious Budgie desktop, as well as dedicated editions with the GNOME and MATE desktop environments, the Solus Project now readies the Solus Plasma Edition, a special edition featuring the latest KDE Plasma desktop environment and related technologies.

An ISO image for the Solus Plasma Edition is now available for public testing, which you can download here, featuring the recently released KDE Plasma 5.14 desktop environment, along with the KDE Applications 18.08.2 and KDE Frameworks 5.51 open-source software suites, all built against the Qt 5.11.2 open-source software development framework.

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RISC OS Liberated

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OS
OSS
  • Acorn Computer's RISC OS operating system finally goes fully open source

    RISC OS, the operating system that powered Acorn Computer's Archimedes computers in the 1980s and 1990s, has been fully released to open source.

    The move was welcomed by Raspberry Pi CEO Eben Upton: "RISC OS is a great demonstration of how much performance a well-tuned operating system and user interface can wring out of a platform. Moving to a free open source licence should bring a renewed interest to RISC OS."

    The shift to open source will enable the operating system to be used in new environments and markets, according to RISC OS Developments director Andrew Rawnsley. "This move unlocks a lot of opportunities for RISC OS that were previously inaccessible due to former licence restrictions. We look forward to seeing the exciting projects that this makes possible," said Rawnsley.

  • Roughly 30 years after its birth at UK's Acorn Computers, RISC OS 5 is going open source

    RISC OS was designed and developed by Acorn Computers, once dubbed the Apple of Britain, in the 1980s to run on the fledgling 32-bit Arm processor family, also designed by Acorn. Yes, the Arm that now powers the world's smartphones, embedded electronics, Internet-of-Things, and more, although it's come a long way since its mid-1980s genesis.

    The operating system, meanwhile, began life as the rough-around-the-edges Arthur 1.20 in 1987 for the ARM2-powered Archimedes A305 and A310, and by 1989, had morphed into the more slick RISC OS 2, written mostly in handcrafted assembly language for performance and memory-footprint reasons.

To BeOS or not to BeOS, that is the Haiku

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OS

Back in 2001, a new operating system arrived that promised to change the way users worked with their computers. That platform was BeOS and I remember it well. What I remember most about it was the desktop, and how much it looked and felt like my favorite window manager (at the time) AfterStep. I also remember how awkward and overly complicated BeOS was to install and use. In fact, upon installation, it was never all too clear how to make the platform function well enough to use on a daily basis. That was fine, however, because BeOS seemed to live in a perpetual state of “alpha release.”

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Elementary OS 5.0 "Juno" Released For A Pleasant Linux Desktop Experience

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OS

Just ahead of Ubuntu 18.10, Solus 4, and Fedora 29 among other forthcoming Linux distribution releases, Elementary OS 5 "Juno" has been released for a polished desktop experience that aims to compete with macOS and Windows for desktop usability.

Elementary OS 5.0 "Juno" continues to be based upon Ubuntu for its package set but continues with its own Pantheon desktop environment and remains quite focused on delivering a polished desktop experience. With the 5.0 Juno release they focused on refining the user experience, improving productivity, and taking their developer platform to the next level.

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Chrome OS Stable Channel Gets Linux Apps

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OS
Linux
Google

After months of user testing in developer and beta channels, the Crostini project at Google finally delivered the goods, Linux apps for most users of Chromebooks in the stable channel—definitely worth the wait. While this still is aimed primarily at developers using Chromebooks, I think there's a good chance these Linux apps will be used and enjoyed by the general public using Chromebooks as well. There's still a bit of a learning curve to overcome before that possibility is realized, but if you already are a user of any Linux distro, it will feel very familiar. Here's an overview of how to install it and what to expect afterward.

After getting the update to version 69, go to Settings and scroll down a bit, and you'll see the option to turn on Linux apps. Figure 1 shows this first step. Note that this isn't available on all Chromebooks; if you're using an older one, you'll have to wait a while before this function is available. If you don't see the option to turn on Linux apps, your Chromebook currently lacks that functionality. But, if you have a Chromebook produced in the past two years, you probably will see the option.

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Android Leftovers

Parrot 4.5 Ethical Hacking OS Released with Metasploit 5.0, Drops 32-Bit Support

Parrot 4.5 is now available, powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.19 kernel series, preparing the project for the upcoming Parrot 5.0 LTS release. For future releases, Parrot Security plans to a support two kernels, stable kernel and a testing kernel. Parrot 4.5 also comes with the latest Metasploit 5.0 penetration testing framework, which introduces major features like new evasion modules, a new search engine, a json-rpc daemon, integrated web services, and support for writting shellcode in C. Read more Also: Parrot 4.5 release notes

GPU acceleration for Linux apps on Chrome OS enabled

It’s happening, and it’s happening early. GPU acceleration for Linux apps on Chrome OS has arrived. According to a recent report, Chromebooks with ‘Eve’ and ‘Nami’ baseboard should now, or very soon, be able to try GPU hardware acceleration. GPU acceleration allows applications to fully leverage the GPU of a device to better run graphic-intensive tasks, like gaming. The feature will make for a much smoother Linux apps experience for Chromebook users. Read more

Out-Of-The-Box 10GbE Network Benchmarks On Nine Linux Distributions Plus FreeBSD 12

Last week I started running some fresh 10GbE Linux networking performance benchmarks across a few different Linux distributions. That testing has now been extended to cover nine Linux distributions plus FreeBSD 12.0 to compare the out-of-the-box networking performance. Tested this round alongside FreeBSD 12.0 was Antergos 19.1, CentOS 7, Clear Linux, Debian 9.6, Fedora Server 29, openSUSE Leap 15.0, openSUSE Tumbleweed, Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS, and Ubuntu 18.10. All of the tests were done with a Tyan S7106 1U server featuring two Intel Xeon Gold 6138 CPUs, 96GB of DDR4 system memory, and Samsung 970 EVO SSD. For the 10GbE connectivity on this server was an add-in HP NC523SFP PCIe adapter providing two 10Gb SPF+ ports using a QLogic 8214 controller. Read more