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Open Solaris 2009.06 - Slowly getting there

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OS

dedoimedo.com: For some strange reason, I keep going back to Open Solaris. Maybe it's the beautiful Gnome desktop, well arranged and streamlined. Maybe it's the belief that Sun, one of the great technology leaders in the past 30 years, can deliver a usable operating system intended for the home market. And maybe it's my desire to crack open the frightening secrets of UNIX, for Linux, Open Solaris is not.

Dell Has Everything To Beat Apple

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OS
Linux
Mac

katonda.com/blog: There are two possibilities, either you create a door for yourself, or if you see a door, then just open it and walk in. We will talk about the door thing later, first tell me: what do you use for your computing?

OS shoot-out: Windows vs. Mac OS X vs. Linux

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OS

linuxworld.com: For the first time in memory, the Mac's market share has hit 9.1 percent, according to IDC data, and Windows' market share has dipped below 90 percent. But can either Mac OS X or Linux be more than a niche OS?

Looking Ahead to Unix's Future

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OS

severwatch.com: Unix has been a major presence in computing for decades, with numerous businesses, government agencies and other organizations relying on it for their mission-critical applications. As a result, making changes to the platform's specifications isn't a task to be undertaken lightly.

10 operating systems you've never heard of

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OS

techradar.com: After a wave of operating system releases, it's easy to become somewhat bored with the software side of computing. We're going to look at 10 of the most intriguing open-source operating systems in this brave new world.

Great and Disappointing Operating Systems of the Decade

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OS

itworld.com: Writing about the best and worst in operating system is like a crap magnet: I'm pressing the big red button.

Too early to declare victory in the netbook war

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OS
Ubuntu

whatpc.co.uk: It really doesn’t matter much whether the world’s netbook owners prefer Windows XP to Ubuntu Linux so why was Microsoft’s Windows communication manager Brandon LeBlanc so excited about his rather dubious sales statistics?

World's Largest Python Conference Comes to Atlanta

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OS

PyCon 2009 drew nearly a thousand Python programmers from around the world, representing projects on all seven continents - including Antarctica! They gathered for serious learning, discussion, and strategizing... and for not-so-serious fun. PyCon 2010, the eighth annual conference of the Python programming community, promises even more.

10 OSes on the Move

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OS

serverwatch.com: It's certainly been quite a decade in the world of enterprise operating systems: There have been some spectacular winners, like Linux, and few epic failures, like Microsoft Vista. With the end of the decade little more than two weeks away, now seems a good time to take a look at what the future might hold. So to mark the end of the Noughties and the start of the Tens here is a highly subjective list of 10 OSes that will (or in some cases won't) be making the news during the next 10 years.

Five Web-Centric Alternatives to Google Chrome OS

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OS
Google

chromeosgeek.com: Despite Google’s move into the operating system (OS) space, the idea of a primarily cloud-centric OS is nothing revolutionary. Some current offerings present welcome alternatives to mainstream operating systems, packing in useful features and making it easier to access your online content.

Also: Yet Another Funny Tshirt

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Uselessd: A Stripped Down Version Of Systemd

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Open source is not dead

I don’t think you can compare Red Hat to other Linux distributions because we are not a distribution company. We have a business model on Enterprise Linux. But I would compare the other distributions to Fedora because it’s a community-driven distribution. The commercially-driven distribution for Red Hat which is Enterprise Linux has paid staff behind it and unlike Microsoft we have a Security Response Team. So for example, even if we have the smallest security issue, we have a guaranteed resolution pattern which nobody else can give because everybody has volunteers, which is fine. I am not saying that the volunteers are not good people, they are often the best people in the industry but they have no hard commitments to fixing certain things within certain timeframes. They will fix it when they can. Most of those people are committed and will immediately get onto it. But as a company that uses open source you have no guarantee about the resolution time. So in terms of this, it is much better using Red Hat in that sense. It’s really what our business model is designed around; to give securities and certainties to the customers who want to use open source. Read more

10 Reasons to use open source software defined networking

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Only FOSSers ‘Get’ FOSS

Back on the first of September I wrote an article about Android, in which I pointed out that Google’s mobile operating system seems to be primarily designed to help sell things. This eventually led to a discussion thread on a subreddit devoted to Android. Needless to say, the fanbois and fangrrls over on Reddit didn’t cotton to my criticism and they devoted a lot of space complaining about how the article was poorly written. Read more