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Cumulus Networks Partners for Open Source Networking OS

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OS
Linux
OSS

Cumulus Networks, which develops Cumulus Linux, describes its product as "the industry's first, full-featured Linux operating system for networking hardware." That's a debatable claim, mostly because "full-featured" is a term that may be interpreted in myriad ways, and because Linux-based operating systems tailored for networking hardware have been around in various forms for decades. But with a focus on hardware-agnosticism and a commitment to supporting a broad range of applications, all while maintaining a Debian Linux-based platform that is not watered-down to the bare essentials, Cumulus is doing some new things in an old niche.

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Simplicity Linux 14.10 Alpha Is an OS Based on Slacko 5.9.3 and Linux kernel 3.15.4

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OS
GNU
Linux
Slack

The developers of Simplicity Linux have based their system on Slacko 5.9.3 and they are using the 3.15.4 Linux kernel. This kernel is one of the newest available and should provide adequate hardware support for the latest devices. Also, unlike previous releases in the series, the new version covers only two flavors, Netbook and Desktop.

The Netbook flavor is a simpler operating system, with fewer default applications and an accessible desktop experience. It's also a smaller ISO, so users won't need too much space for the actual size of the Linux distribution.

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Pear OS 8 Still Gets Thousands of Downloads Despite Being Officially Dead – Gallery

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OS

The curios case of Pear OS 8 is a very interesting one. This operating system had numerous problems during its existence, which spanned a few years. The devs had to change the name two or three times, they had to change the logo as well, and they finally decided on Pear OS. They had a few releases under the Pear OS name, but one day the distro disappeared.

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OpenELEC 4.2 Beta 5 Is Now Out with New Linux Kernel and NVIDIA Drivers

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OS
OSS

The OpenELEC devs have released yet another Beta version of their embedded operating systems and they are getting really close to get a new stable version out the door. Some of the major components have been updated as well and the Raspberry Pi users should be really thrilled about this latest upgrade, as it includes some interesting changes for them as well.

"This release includes some bugfixes, security fixes and improvements since OpenELEC-4.1.4. Besides the usual bugfixes and package updates we updated XBMC to XBMC Gotham 13.2 final, FFmpeg to ffmpeg-2.3.3, Mesa to Mesa-10.3-rc1and systemd to systemd-216. We fixed crashes while playing FLAC files with ID3v2 tags, optimized some software packages and updated the RaspberryPi firmware to include the last fixes and features," said the devs in the official announcement.

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Haiku OS Gains Rudimentary Support For Haswell Graphics

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OS
OSS

Haiku, the open-source operating system that maintains compatibility with the defunct BeOS, now appears to have basic support for Haswell graphics.

A commit hit Haiku Git today entitled Add support for my Core i3 integrated graphics. The commit just adds Haswell desktop PCI IDs and that's about it, but was apparently enough to have Adrien Destugues' Core i3 Haswell system now light up with Haiku.

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Release notes for the Genode OS Framework 14.08

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OS

The overall theme of version 14.08 is the introduction of a new scalable GUI architecture that takes security as the most fundamental premise. It is unique in the way that the security of graphical applications and thereby the privacy of the user depends on only a few components of very little complexity. We strive for low complexity to reduce the likelihood for bugs and thereby the attack surface of the system. When using a secure microkernel such as NOVA, Genode's trusted computing base for graphical applications is orders of magnitude less complex compared to contemporary operating systems. To illustrate the rigidity of this claim, the security-sensitive parts of the GUI stack do not even depend on a C runtime. With the current release, we maintain our focus on security while taking the scalability of the GUI architecture to a level that meets the expectations of general-purpose OSes. Thanks to its component-based design, the new GUI stack provides a great deal of flexibility with respect to its behaviour and style. Section New GUI architecture provides the rationale behind the development, the big picture of the architecture, and details about the current implementation.

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Haiku debates kernel switch (but it's not happening)

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OS
Linux

A very interesting discussion is taking place in the Haiku mailing list right now. A developer has created a working prototype implementation of the BeOS API layer on top of the Linux kernel, and he is wondering if the project is worth pursuing.

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GitHub.io killed the distro star: Why are people so bored with the top Linux makers?

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OS

Matthew Miller is a little concerned. As the new project leader for the Fedora Linux distribution, he thinks Fedora 20 is great and Fedora 21, when it ships, will be the best release ever. But he worries that to everyone else, Fedora – and Linux distros in general – are getting a little, well … boring.

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China Developing Its Own OS To Take On Apple, Microsoft, and Google

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OS
Linux

If it hasn't been made clear enough in recent months that China would love nothing more than to cut down on its reliance to American technology companies, its just-announced decision to create its own operating system should remedy that. At first, this OS will target the desktop, but eventually, it'll make its way to smartphones and other mobile devices.
At this point, we know very little about what China's OS will look like, or be like for that matter, but we do know that it's being designed to be a proper replacement for Microsoft's and Google's OSes. It seems very likely that China's OS would use Linux as a base, since there's little point in reinventing the wheel, and because of its open-source nature, the country would have complete control over the code. Further, Linux natively supports both x86 and ARM architectures, so that'd help take care of both the desktop and mobile aspect of the OS, and of course, Linux already supports a lot of software

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Operating System U

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OS
Linux
Reviews

Are you tired of being forced to upgrade your Operating System regularly? What about the unnecessary changes that end up being made, changes that you don’t even want, much less need? How would you like to pick and choose what aspects of your operating system you want upgraded, and leave the ones you know, love, and are accustomed to how they are?

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More in Tux Machines

Why open source programming languages are crushing proprietary peers

It's no secret that open source now dominates big data infrastructure. From Kubernetes to Hadoop to MongoDB, "No dominant platform-level software infrastructure has emerged in the last ten years in closed-source, proprietary form," as Cloudera chief strategy officer Mike Olson reminded us. Read more

CORD becomes a Linux Foundation project

Central Office Re-architected as a Data Center (CORD), an open source integrated solutions platform for service providers leveraging merchant silicon, white boxes, and open source platforms such as Open Network Operating System (ONOS), OpenStack, Docker, and the cloud operating system XOS, is now part of the Linux Foundation as a new independent project. The Linux foundation is already home to many open source networking projects, including OpenDaylight and ONOS, so CORD is a natural fit for the non-profit foundation. Read more

Google beefs Linux up kernel defenses in Android

Future versions of Android will be more resilient to exploits thanks to developers' efforts to integrate the latest Linux kernel defenses into the operating system. Android's security model relies heavily on the Linux kernel that sits at its core. As such, Android developers have always been interested in adding new security features that are intended to prevent potentially malicious code from reaching the kernel, which is the most privileged area of the operating system. Read more

Fork YOU! Sure, take the code. Then what?

There's an old adage in the open source world – if you don't like it, fork it. This advice, often given in a flippant manner, makes it seem like forking a piece of software is not a big deal. Indeed, forking a small project you find on GitHub is not a big deal. There's even a handy button to make it easy to fork it. Unlike many things in programming though, that interaction model, that simplicity of forking, does not scale. There is no button next to Debian that says Fork it! Thinking that all you need to do to make a project yours is to fork it is a fundamental misunderstanding of what large free/open source projects are – at their hearts, they are communities. One does not simply walk into Debian and fork it. One can, on the other hand, walk out of a project, bring all the other core developers along, and essentially leave the original an empty husk. This is what happened when LibreOffice forked away from the once-mighty OpenOffice; it's what happened when MariaDB split from MySQL; and it's what happened more recently when the core developers behind ownCloud left the company and forked the code to start their own project, Nextcloud. They also, thankfully, dropped the silly lowercase first letter thing. Nextcloud consists of the core developers who built ownCloud, but who were not, and, judging by the very public way this happened, had not been, in control of the direction of the product for some time. Read more