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CoreOS, OCI Unveil Controversial Open Container Industry Standard

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OS
Server

CoreOS and the Open Container Initiative on Wednesday introduced image and runtime specifications largely based on Docker's image format technology.

However, OCI's decision to model the standard on Docker's de facto platform has raised questions. Some critics have argued for other options.

Version 1.0 provides a stable standard for application containers, according to Brandon Philips, CTO at CoreOS and chair of the OCI Technical Oversight Board.

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LinuxAndUbuntu Distro Review Of The Week - NeptuneOS

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OS
Reviews

We want a nice looking distro, don’t we? We want a distro that does the best work when it comes to stability. Don’t we? Here we come across NeptuneOS, a Linux distro based on Debian with KDE desktop environment. As we all know when it comes to stability, there are a lot of fewer distros that can match Debian. Also being based on Debian, the number of compatible software increase a lot.

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Endless OS 3.2 Adds Exciting Changes, a Refreshed Desktop, and More Offline Apps

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OS

Endless OS, the user-friendly, powerful, easy-to-use, and fast Linux-based operating system that comes preloaded with over 100 applications and tools, some of which work offline, has been updated to version 3.2.

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SolydXK 9 Linux OS Debuts Based on Debian 9 Stretch, Drops Raspberry Pi Support

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OS
Linux
Debian

The developers of the Debian-based SolydXK GNU/Linux distribution announced today the release and immediate availability for download of the SolydXK 9 operating system series.

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Open-source world resurrects Oracle-free Solaris project OmniOS

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OS
OSS

The open-source community has fought back and resurrected the development of OmniOS – an Oracle-free non-proprietary variant of Solaris, which had been shelved in April.

The development of OmniOS, a distribution of Illumos derived from Sun's open-source flavor of Solaris, was killed after five years of work by web applications biz OmniTI.

It was hoped OmniOS would be community-driven, simple to use, and fast to install and operate. However, the project was axed, as the project failed to make any cash out of the development and a community failed to emerge. Consequently all work stopped and support contracts were not renewed.

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How to Switch Between Chrome OS Stable, Beta, and Dev Channels on a Chromebook

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OS
HowTos

Google, like many other software developers, offers multiple development channels for their Chrome and Chrome OS products, and we'd like to show you today how easy is to switch between the Stable, Beta, and Dev channels.

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Parrot Security OS Ethical Hacking Linux Distro Now Based on Debian 10 "Buster"

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OS
Linux

The developers of the Parrot Security OS ethical hacking and penetration testing distro announced today the release and immediate availability for download of Parrot Security OS 3.7.

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Multics resurrected: proto-Unix now runs on Raspberry Pi or x86

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OS

Seminal time-sharing OS Multics - the Multiplexed Information and Computing Service - has been resurrected in a new simulator.

As The Register reported in 2011, Multics' sprang from MIT's decision to eschew an IBM mainframe, buy one from GE instead and write an OS for the machine. The operating system's source code was released in 2007, when we noted Multics' place in history as one of the first OSes “...to introduce concepts such as a hierarchical file system and dynamic linking. It was also the first to use the modern standard of per-process stacks in the kernal, with a separate stack for each security ring.”

As our own Liam Proven wrote back in 2011, “Unix was conceived as a sort of anti-Multics – 'Uni' versus 'multi', geddit? Unix was meant to be small and simple, as opposed to the large, complicated Multics. Consider the labyrinthine complexity of modern Unix and ponder what Multics must have been like.”

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Endless OS 3.2 Released, Rebases From GNOME Shell 3.8 To 3.22

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OS

Endless OS 3.2 is now available as the newest feature release for this GNOME-based Linux operating system that ships on the budget-friendly Endless Computers and is also available for free to all users.

Endless OS 3.2 has a number of underlying system updates including to its Linux kernel and Flatpak. On the UI side, there are big updates to its desktop with the re-basing process from GNOME Shell 3.8 to GNOME Shell 3.22. Moving forward, they intend to re-base their desktop changes much more often to allow for a smoother transition to using the newer GNOME code in their operating system.

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Also: Endless OS 3.2 released!

Ars spends too much time trying to work in Haiku, the BeOS successor

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OS

And it started with such promise, too. Haiku, the open-source successor to the late and lamented BeOS—that late, lamented operating system of the 1990s developed at Apple refugee Jean-Louis Gassée's Be Inc. BeOS was intended to compete with the "classic" Apple MacOS and with Microsoft Windows; by 1996, Gassée was jockeying to get Apple to acquire his company and make BeOS the basis of the next-generation Macintosh operating system. But then along came some guy named Steve Jobs, with a company called NeXT. And the rest, as they say, is history. Be Inc. was eventually acquired by another doomed company (Palm) and dissolved.

Haiku (initially "OpenBeOS," but changed because of copyright assertions by Palm) was launched in 2001 to create an operating system that was binary-compatible with applications written for the ill-fated BeOS. It uses the same C++ API as BeOS, but it is a re-implementation of that API, so it shares virtually none of the code of the original BeOS. As it has evolved, Haiku has taken two diverging roads: a 32-bit version that retains backward compatibility, and a 64-bit version that is more forward-looking but breaks backward compatibility because of compiler issues. That's because the 32-bit version, (like BeOS before it, is based on Gnu Compiler Collection (GCC) 2.

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More in Tux Machines

Keeping up with advances in open source database administration

The world of open source databases is rapidly evolving. It seems like every day brings a new release of an open source technology that might make a database administrator's life easier, if only he or she knew about it. Fortunately, there are many ways to stay on top of what's going on with open source database technology. One such way is the Percona Live Open Source Database Conference, taking place next week in Dublin, Ireland. We've covered Percona Live before, and invite you to take a look back at some of our previous stories. From IoT to big data to working with the cloud, there's plenty to keep up with. Here are a look at a couple of the sessions you might enjoy, as described by the speakers. Read more

TUXEDO InfinityBook Pro 13 Review: a Powerful Ultrabook Running TUXEDO Xubuntu

There is no doubt that the TUXEDO InfinityBook Pro 13 is not a powerful ultrabook, providing good value for the money. And having it shipped with a Linux OS pre-installed makes your Linux journey a breeze if you're just getting started with exploring the wonderful world of Open Source software and GNU/Linux technologies. There are a few issues that caught our attention during our testing, and you should be aware of them before buying this laptop. For example, the LCD screen leaks light, which is most visible on a dark background and when watching movies. Also, the display is only be tilted back to about 120 degrees, which might be inconvenient for the owner. The laptop doesn't heat up that much, and we find the backlit keyboard with the Tux logo on the Super key a plus when buying a TUXEDO InfinityBook Pro 13. Of course, if you don't need all this power, you can always buy any other laptop out there and install your favorite Linux OS on it, but it's not guaranteed that everything will work out of the box like on TUXEDO InfinityBook Pro 13. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Sonic Mania ‘Plays Perfectly’ on Linux via WINE
    The Windows version of Sonic Mania is playable on Linux using WINE — and that’s not just me saying that, that’s a bunch of Linux gamers over on Reddit (where else?).
  • Icculus has ported The End is Nigh to on-demand service 'Jump', Linux may come soon plus some thoughts
    Ever heard of the on-demand subscription gaming service Jump? It's an on-demand game streaming service and Icculus just ported The End is Nigh to it. Recently, I wrote about how The End is Nigh might be coming to Linux. Sadly, that's not actually the case just yet. Announcing it on his Patreon, Icculus noted about his work to port it to the on-demand service Jump. They actually reached out to him to do it, as it turns out.
  • liveslak 1.1.9 and new ISO images
    The ‘liveslak‘ scripts used to create the ISO images for Slackware Live Edition have been stamped with a new version, 1.1.9. The updates are significant enough to warrant an ‘official’ update and new ISO images. The latest set of Slackware Live Edition ISOs are based on liveslak 1.1.9 and Slackware-current dated “Tue Sep 19 20:49:07 UTC 2017“. Just in time (I was already creating ISOS based on -current “Mon Sep 18 19:15:03 UTC 2017“) I noticed that Patrick downgraded the freetype package in Slackware, and I re-generated all of the ISO images to incorporate the latest freetype package – because that one is working and the previous one had serious issues. If you already use a Slackware Live USB stick that you do not want to re-format, you should use the “-r” parameter to the “iso2usb.sh” script. The “-r” or refresh parameter allows you to refresh the liveslak files on your USB stick without touching your custom content.
  • The best of Tizen deals from Samsung’s ‘Smart Utsav’ festive offers in India
  • Chrome 62 Beta: Network Quality Estimator API, OpenType variable fonts, and media capture from DOM elements
    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Chrome OS, Linux, Mac, and Windows.
  • Chrome 62 Beta Released With OpenType Font Variations, DOM Media Capture
    Google has rolled out their public beta of the upcoming Chrome/Chromium 62 web-browser update.
  • Turning Off Wi-Fi and Bluetooth in iOS 11's Control Center Doesn’t Actually Turn Off Wi-Fi or Bluetooth [Ed: Proprietary software means you cannot trust it and anything you think it does it likely won't]
    Turning off Bluetooth and Wi-Fi when you're not using them on your smartphone has long been standard, common sense, advice. Unfortunately, with the iPhone's new operating system iOS 11, turning them off is not as easy as it used to be. Now, when you toggle Bluetooth and Wi-Fi off from the iPhone's Control Center—the somewhat confusing menu that appears when you swipe up from the bottom of the phone—it actually doesn't completely turn them off. While that might sound like a bug, that's actually what Apple intended in the new operating system. But security researchers warn that users might not realize this and, as a consequence, could leave Bluetooth and Wi-Fi on without noticing.
  • HP Brings Back Obnoxious DRM That Cripples Competing Printer Cartridges
    Around a year ago, HP was roundly and justly ridiculed for launching a DRM time bomb -- or a software update designed specifically to disable competing printer cartridges starting on a set date. As a result, HP Printer owners using third-party cartridges woke up one day to warnings about a "cartridge problem," or errors stating, "one or more cartridges are missing or damaged," or that the user was using an "older generation cartridge." The EFF was quick to lambast the practice in a letter to HP, noting that HP abused its security update mechanism to trick its customers and actively erode product functionality. HP only made matters worse for itself by claiming at the time that it was only looking out for the safety and security of its customers, while patting itself on the back for being pro-active about addressing a problem it caused -- only after a massive consumer backlash occurred.
  • EFF quits W3C over decision to accept EME as Web standard
     

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation has resigned from the World Wide Web Consortium after the latter announced it was accepting the published Encrypted Media Extensions as a Web standard.  

Programming: OpenJ9, HHVM, and Good API Documentation

  • IBM open-sources a microservices-friendly Java app server
    A few weeks ago, Nginx released its multilanguage microservices-friendly app server, but without Java support at launch. Now IBM has a beta build of its own microservices-friendly app server for Java applications: the open source Open Liberty, which implements IBM’s version of Java EE and MicroProfile microservices implementation. Open Liberty will provide a runtime supporting Java microservices that can be quickly updated and moved among different cloud environments. When combined with the Eclipse OpenJ9 Java Virtual Machine, OpenLiberty will provide a full Java stack, IBM said. (OpenJ9 had been IBM’s J9 JVM, which it contributed to the Eclipse Foundation that now manages Java EE.)
  • The Future of HHVM
    Several months ago, PHP officially announced the end-of-life for PHP5. The HHVM team is happy about the direction PHP has taken with PHP7, and we’re proud of the role we’ve played in pushing the language and runtime to where they are today. Since the PHP community is finally saying goodbye to PHP5, we’ve decided to do so as well.
  • The Ten Essentials for Good API Documentation