Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OS

More on Devuan GNU/Linux 2.0

Filed under
OS
  • systemd-free Debian-based Devuan 2.0 ASCII has been released

    Debian based Devuan 2.0 has been released. Devuan doesn’t use systemd and the new release allows you to choose between SysVinit and OpenRC init systems.

  • Devuan ships second stable cut of its systemd-free Linux

    Systemd-free Linux distro Devuan has released its stable Version 2.0.

    The project's last release candidate was released in May, and as you'd hope, not much has changed between then and full release.

    Because it's written by purists, we should include the full name of the release: it's Devuan GNU+Linux 2.0 ASCII Stable.

  • Devuan GNU/Linux 2.0 "ASCII" Operating System Launches for Init Freedom Lovers

    Devuan, the open-source GNU/Linux distribution designed to offers users a stable, reliable, and free operating system that doesn't depend on the systemd init, has been updated to version 2.0.

    Continuing project's tradition to offer users alternatives to systemd and its components, Devuan GNU/Linux 2.0 is dubbed "ASCII" and it's based on the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series. It comes with a large variety of desktop environments, among which we can mention KDE, Xfce, Cinnamon, MATE, and LXQt.

    However, Devuan GNU/Linux 2.0 ships with Xfce as default desktop environment. Many other desktop environments are available after installation, and Devuan GNU/Linux's expert install mode lets users choose between the SysVinit and OpenRC init systems instead of systemd.

Devuan, Canonical and Ubuntu

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu
  • Devuan ships second stable cut of its systemd-free Linux

    Systemd-free Linux distro Devuan has released its stable Version 2.0.

    The project's last release candidate was released in May, and as you'd hope, not much has changed between then and full release.

    Because it's written by purists, we should include the full name of the release: it's Devuan GNU+Linux 2.0 ASCII Stable.

  • The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 531
  • Empowering developers to embrace Linux

     

    There is a huge opportunity for businesses to embrace new technologies and move their company forward. Open source and snaps are simple solutions, but ones that gives the most vital innovators in a business - developers - the tools they need to be confident in launching some of the world’s most utilised software.    

  • R 3.5.0 on Debian and Ubuntu: An Update

    R 3.5.0 was released a few weeks ago. As it changes some (important) internals, packages installed with a previous version of R have to be rebuilt. This was known and expected, and we took several measured steps to get R binaries to everybody without breakage.

    The question of but how do I upgrade without breaking my system was asked a few times, e.g., on the r-sig-debian list as well as in this StackOverflow question.

AsteroidOS 1.0 is a promising open-source smartwatch OS with plenty of room for improvement

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux

Built entirely on GNU/Linux technologies, AsteroidOS offers a very basic, spartan experience. It features notification mirroring and a few apps like a calendar, calculator, and weather to get you by. In its current state, it's a neat project, but the best I can say for real-world use is that it works. When compared to watchOS, Wear OS, and Tizen, it has a very, very long way to go. Luckily, the developer knows this and has a few additions planned for future updates.

I've spent the better part of two weeks with AsteroidOS on my LG Watch Urbane as my primary smartwatch — the absolutely horrendous LG Watch Style battery life and being unable to pair my Gear S3 with my Pixel 2 XL on Android P DP2 certainly helped this period not feel so bad (no, I haven't tried DP3 yet). I don't mean to imply that AsteroidOS is a negative experience; it's just that it feels like several large steps backwards after what I've grown accustomed to in recent years.

Read more

Sailfish OS 2.2.0 is now available for Jolla devices & Sailfish X

Filed under
OS
Linux

One of the biggest and most feature packed Sailfish OS updates is now available through early access on Jolla devices and Sailfish X! This update’s name is Mouhijoki, which is a river in Finland with roots from the lake Mouhijärvi. Mouhijoki is only 11,5 km long. It runs through farming field sceneries, with occasional cottages and saunas in Pirkanmaa area close to the city of Tampere.

Read more

BSD Leftovers

Filed under
OS
BSD
  • OpenBSD on APU4

    Today I got an APU.4B4

    This is how I got OpenBSD installed on it.

  • libcsi - Crypto Simplified Interface
  • It’s UNIX. On A Microcontroller.

    It’s difficult to convey in an era when a UNIX-like operating system sits in your pocket, how there was once a time when the mere word was enough to convey an aura of immense computing power. If you ran UNIX, your computer probably filled a room, and you used it for Serious Stuff rather than just checking your Twitter feed. UNIX machines may still perform high-end tasks, but Moore’s Law has in the intervening years delivered upon its promise, and your phone with its UNIX-like OS is far more powerful than that room-sized minicomputer of the 1970s. A single chip for a few cents can do that job, which begs the question: just how little do we need to run UNIX today? It’s something [Joerg Wolfram] could advise you upon, because he’s got a functional UNIX running on a microcontroller.

Genode OS and ReactOS Progress

Filed under
OS
  • Release notes for the Genode OS Framework 18.05

    The driver behind the release 18.05 is the rapid evolution of the Sculpt general-purpose OS. Following the initial version from February, which was targeted at early adopters, the new Sculpt for The Curious (TC) introduces a much more welcoming and empowering user experience (Section Sculpt for The Curious).

  • Genode OS 18.05 Rolls Out Java Support, New NVMe Driver & Sculpt OS Update

    Version 18.05 of the Genode operating system framework is now available along with the second revision to its Sculpt OS, what desires to become a general purpose OS based upon Genode.

    The Sculpt operating system now has better customization abilities, support for hot-plugging of USB storage devices, support for NVMe devices now in addition to SATA, interactive WiFi configuration, UEFI boot support, and many other improvements.

  • ReactOS Is Finally Able To Build Itself

    ReactOS, the "open-source Windows" operating system re-implementation, is now able to finally self-host itself in fully compile ReactOS from ReactOS.

    ReactOS developer Pierre Schweitzer announced today that ReactOS is fully self-hosting.

CentOS Linux 7 Receives Important Kernel Security Update That Patches Six Flaws

Filed under
OS
Linux
Red Hat
Security

Being based on the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 operating system series, CentOS Linux 7 follows a rolling release model where the user installs once and receives regular updates forever. There's no need to reinstall your healthy CentOS Linux installation when a new release is out, but you should keep it up-to-date at all times.

A new kernel security update was released upstream by Red Hat for the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 operating system series, which addresses a total of six security vulnerabilities discovered and reported by various security researchers. The kernel security update is now also available for CentOS Linux 7 users.

Read more

Flatcar Linux: The CoreOS Operating System Lives on Beyond Red Hat

Filed under
OS
Linux
Red Hat

As part of the integration between the product lines of the company that put containerized Linux on the map and the most powerful name in all of enterprise Linux, Red Hat has said it will adopt the “CoreOS” name for its forthcoming edition of its own Linux for containers. Yet although “Red Hat CoreOS” will adopt the self-updating technology that made CoreOS Inc.’s products competitive, a Red Hat official told The New Stack, the kernel will remain essentially compatible with the Fedora/Atomic/RHEL base it has already produced, for reasons the official said mainly concerned maintaining the certification of systems running on that kernel.

So while Red Hat makes plans for what to do with the CoreOS Container Linux, others are also eyeing the code base which after all, continues to be an open source project licensed under Apache 2.0. During the last KubeCon + CloudNativeCon in Copenhagen, attendees were re-introduced to Kinvolk, a Berlin-based group of open source contributors, including Chris Kühl, who were early contributors to the rkt container runtime devised at CoreOS and since donated to the CNCF. Now, Kühl and his colleagues have committed to producing and maintaining a fork of CoreOS Container Linux. Called Flatcar Linux, its immediate goal is to maintain its container-agnostic architecture, and maybe later try resuming its own development path.

Read more

Android-Based RaspAnd OS for Raspberry Pi 3 Gets Bluetooth, Wi-Fi Improvements

Filed under
OS
Android
Linux

Coming almost half a year after the last release, which brought support for the official Raspberry Pi 7-inch touchscreen and smart TVs, RaspAnd Build 180529 remains based on the Android 7.1.2 Nougat mobile operating system but updates various components to their latest versions at the moment of writing.

Among these, we can mention Google Play Services 12.6.85 and Google Play store 10.1.08-all included in the GAPPS (Google Apps) package, Kodi 18.0 Alpha 2 media center, TeamViewer 13.1.8817, Jelly Browser 7.1.2, Aptoide TV 4.0.2, ES File Explorer 4.1.7.2, Chess 2.4.0, AIDA64 1.51, Termux 0.60, and Quick Reboot Pro 1.8.4.

Read more

Devices: Ibase, OpenWatch, Purism

Filed under
OS
Linux
Hardware
  • 3.5-inch Apollo Lake SBC supports industrial temperatures

    Ibase’s Linux-compatible, 3.5-inch “IB818” SBC provides a dual- or quad-core Apollo Lake SoC, plus 2x GbE, 4x USB 3.0, 2x SATA, 2x mini-PCIe, triple display support, wide-range power, and -40 to 85°C support.

  • AsteroidOS and OpenWatch offer open alternatives to smartwatch stacks

    The open source, Linux based “AsteroidOS” alternative to Wear OS arrives in a stable 1.0 release, and Block spins off some of its Android smartwatch stack as an open source OpenWatch Project.

    The AsteroidOS project has released version 1.0 of its open source, Linux-based smartwatch distribution. Designed for after-market installation on “Wear OS by Google” (formerly Android Wear) watches, AsteroidOS can now be dual booted on seven different models. The release follows the late March announcement of an OpenWatch Project for building Android based open source custom ROMs on Wear OS watches.

  • Purism Publishes Librem 5 Dev Kit Details, Small Batch Order Going In Soon

    Purism has published their nearly final specifications on their limited-run Librem 5 Dev Kit. The cutoff for ordering a developer kit is next week as they are placing their hardware order and planning on only this single, limited run of the developer kit prior to the phones becoming available next year.

    Their deadline for ordering a developer kit is the end of the month and the kit price has raised to $399 USD. In the process, Purism believes they are still on track for their January 2019 for coming up with having the phone's actual hardware ready.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Software: Virtlyst 1.2.0, Blender 2.8 Plan, Dropbox Gets Worse and DaVinci Resolve 15 Targets GNU/Linux

  • Virtlyst 1.2.0 released
    Virtlyst – a Web Interface to manage virtual machines build with Cutelyst/Qt/C++ got a new release. This new release includes a bunch of bug fixes, most importantly probably being the ability to warn user before doing important actions to help avoid doing mistakes. Most commits came from new contributor René Linder who is also working on a Bootstrap 4 theme and Lukas Steiner created a dockerfile for it. This is especially cool because Virtlyst repository now has 4 authors while Cutelyst which is way older has only 6.
  • Blender 2.8 Planning Update
    At this point we will not have a feature complete Beta release ready in August as we had hoped. Instead, we invested most of our time improving the features that were already there and catching up with the bug tracker. This includes making the viewport and EEVEE work on more graphics cards and platforms. The Spring open movie team is also using Blender 2.8 in production, which is helping us ensure the new dependency graph and tools can handle complex production scenes.
  • Blender 2.80 Now Coming In Early 2019 With Many Improvements
    The Blender 3D modeling software is facing a slight set-back in their release schedule for the big Blender 2.80 release, but it's moving along and they intend to have it ready by early next year.
  • Dropbox will only Support the Ext4 File System In Linux in November
    Dropbox has announced that starting on November 7th 2018, only the ext4 file system will be supported in Linux for synchronizing folders in the Dropbox desktop app. Those Linux users who have synch on other file systems such as XFS, ext2, ext3, ZFS, and many others will no longer have working Dropbox synchronization after this date. This news came out after Linux dropbox users began seeing notifications stating "Dropbox Will Stop Syncing Ext4 File Systems in November." You can see an example of this alert in Swedish below.
  • Dropbox scares users by shrinking synching options
    Dropbox has quietly announced it will soon stop synching files that reside on drives tended by some filesystems. The sync ‘n’ share service’s desktop client has recently produced warnings that the software will stop syncing in November 2018. Those warnings were sufficiently ambiguous that Dropbox took to its support forums to explain exactly what’s going on, namely that as of November 7th, 2018, “we’re ending support for Dropbox syncing to drives with certain uncommon file systems.”
  • DaVinci Resolve 15 Video/Effects Editor Released With Linux Support
    DaVinci Resolve 15 has been released by Blackmagic Design as the company's professional-grade video editing, visual effects, motion graphics, and audio post-production software.

How to display data in a human-friendly way on Linux

Not everyone thinks in binary or wants to mentally insert commas into large numbers to come to grips with the sizes of their files. So, it's not surprising that Linux commands have evolved over several decades to incorporate more human-friendly ways of displaying information to its users. In today’s post, we look at some of the options provided by various commands that make digesting data just a little easier. Read more

today's howtos

KDE and GNOME GSoC: Falkon, WikiToLearn, Nautilus and Pitivi

  • The Joy of GSoC :)
    Wooo... this is the last day of coding phase of GSoC. I am writing this blog to share my experience and work done in the coding phase. I want to specially thank my mentor David Rosca for his help, suggestions and reviews. This was my first exposure to the KDE community and I am proud that it was great. I really enjoyed the whole program from proposal submission - intermediate evals - then now this final evaluation. Also, I had learned a lot working on my project. Frankly speaking, I didn't knew about i18n and l10n much but with the help of my mentor now I have a quite good understanding of how these works and are implemented. I can truly say this was one of my best summer vacations.
  • What’s next for WikiToLearn?
    Google Summer of Code is finishing and many things have been done on WikiToLearn since previous post. A little recap is needed. Talking with mentors has been crucial because they told me to focus on finishing CRUD interaction with API backend instead of working on “history mode” viewer.
  • GSoC 2018 Final Evaluation
    As GSoC is coming to an end, I am required to put my work altogether in order for it to be easily available and hopefully help fellow/potential contributors work on their own projects.  [...] At its prestige, through this project we will have tests both for most critical and used operations of Nautilus, and for the search engines we use. Further on, I’ll provide links for all of my merge requests and dwell a bit on their ins and outs while posting links to my commits:
  • GTK+ 4 and Nautilus </GSoC>
    Another summer here at GNOME HQ comes to an end. While certainly eventful, it unfortunately did not result in a production-ready Nautilus port to GTK+ 4 (unless you don’t intend to use the location entry or any other entry, but more on that later).
  • Pitivi Video Editor Gains UI Polish, Video Preview Resizing
    The latest Google Summer of Code 2018 is allowing some excellent work to be done on some excellent open source projects. Among them Pitivi, the non-linear video editor built using GTK and Gstreamer and offering up a basic video editing feature set. Over the past few months, Harish Fulara, a Computer Science student, has worked on improving the application’s greeter dialog and on adding support dynamic resizing of the video preview box.