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OS

Debian-Based Q4OS 1.8.3 "Orion" Distro Released with Update Manager Improvements

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OS
Debian

Softpedia was informed today, March 1, 2017, by the Q4OS team about the general availability of the third maintenance update to the Q4OS 1.8 "Orion" stable operating system series.

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Zorin Desktop Is a Crowd Pleaser

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OS
Reviews

I am impressed with the Zorin OS 12.1 release. Zorin OS is not the same old GNOME distro retread. It has a well integrated and tweaked user interface that justifies the developer's moniker of "Zorin Desktop 2."

Zorin OS 12.1 is an ideal choice for large deployments in businesses, governments, schools and organizations. A key reason for its business and government suitability is the new release schedule. Major releases of Zorin OS happen only once every two years. Minor updates like version 12.1 come every few months as needed.

Users will be spared major disruptions without feeling that their operating system is aging or abandoned. The result is an efficient and healthy balance.

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Why a Chrome OS and Android merger isn't what we really need

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OS
Android

Lately I've been giving this question quite a bit of thought. I depend on both Chrome OS and Android. I use them throughout every day and would find my process a bit more challenging without them. When it was first announced that Chrome OS would be able to run Android apps, my initial thoughts were positive; I considered this move by Google to be the most logical step forward. It was clearly the best way to compete with the Microsoft Surface and to bring more users into the fold. Although chromebooks continually sell incredibly well, some consider Chrome OS to be less than a legitimate platform. Why? The lack of native apps. And that is why Google gave life to the Android Play Store on Chrome OS (at least for certain devices).

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FreeBSD-Based TrueOS Operating System Gets New Jail Tools, Automounting Feature

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OS
BSD

The developers of the FreeBSD-based TrueOS operating system (formerly PC-BSD) announced the release and general availability of a new stable build versioned 2017-02-22.

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Voyager 9 Linux Distro Enters Development, Now Based on Debian 9 "Stretch"

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OS
Linux
Debian

The developers of the Voyager Linux OS announced the availability of the first Beta build of the upcoming Voyager 9 release, which will be based on the soon-to-be-announced Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system.

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Debian-Based GParted Live 0.28.1-1 Released with Linux 4.9.6 and GParted 0.28.1

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OS
Debian

A day after announcing the release of GParted 0.28.1, which re-enabled the ability for users to resize or move primary disk partitions, Curtis Gedak is today releasing the GParted Live 0.28.1-1 distro.

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Also: GParted 0.28.1 Restores Ability to Resize or Move Primary Partitions, Fixes Bugs

This Custom Compiled Chromium OS Is Designed for Desktop and Laptop Computers

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OS

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton informs us about the availability of the second build of his custom compiled Chromium OS distribution, ChromX, an open-source alternative to Google's Chrome OS for Chromebooks.

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ToaruOS 1.0 Released, Hobby OS/Kernel Written From Scratch Over 6+ Years

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OS

In the past on Phoronix we have mentioned ToaruOS a few times. It's a "hobby" kernel and operating system written mostly from scratch yet supports Mesa, GCC, Python, and more. It's been in development since 2011 while now the operating system's 1.0 release finally took place.

The ToaruOS developer wrote in about the Toaru 1.0 release that took place at the end of January. He wrote, "After six years of development, I am very happy to finally announce the 1.0 release of ToaruOS. While I would not consider this "complete" - there is still much work to be done - it is time to refocus my development, and with that comes the time to declare a stable release. ToaruOS 1.0 has been the result of over half a decade of effort, with contributions from a dozen people besides myself."

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Sailfish OS 2.1.0 now available to early access for Jolla devices

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OS

This is our biggest release in a while after Aurajoki. It marks thousands of bug fixes with fundamental improvements to the operating system and is now available for early access across Jolla devices.

2.1.0 is named after Finland’s Iijoki, located in Northern Ostrobothnia, which flows 370 kilometers into the gulf of Bothnia.

Iijoki brings major architectural changes to Sailfish OS by introducing Qt 5.6 UI framework, BlueZ 5 Bluetooth stack and basic implementations of 64-bit architecture. It also brings improvements to the camera software with faster shutter speeds, initial support for Virtual Private Networks (VPN), option to enlarge UI fonts to different levels and last but not least, a large number of bug and error fixes mostly reported by our community.

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Also: 2.1.0/Iijoki

Tizen Apps

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OS
Linux
Software
  • Smartphone App: Walkie Talkie app added to Tizen Store

    Last week, we have had a new Walkie Talkie app added to the Tizen Store, something a little different and a little fun, created by developer SomyaC. A walkie-talkie (more formally known as a Handheld Transceiver, or HT) is a hand- held, portable, two-way radio transceiver that lets you communicate directly between both handsets.

  • Smartphone App: Speed Test for Samsung Z1, Z2, Z3 is available in Tizen Store

    Do you know what is your internet speed on your Tizen smartphone? Do you know your internet connection download or upload speed? Anything about ping? Have you never test it? No problem! Developer Srabani S S Patra added a new app last week named Speed Test.

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Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Microsoft says its best not to fiddle with its Windows 10 group policies (that don't work)

    On Monday, we revealed that a security researcher had used a packet sniffer to show that many settings designed to prevent access to the internet were being ignored with connections to a range of third party servers including advertising hubs.

  • What's got a vast attack surface and runs on Linux? Windows Defender, of course
    Google Project Zero's Windows bug-hunter and fuzz-boffin Tavis Ormandy has given the world an insight into how he works so fast: he works on Linux, and with the release of a personal project on GitHub, others can too. Ormandy's project is to port Windows DLLs to Linux for his vuln tests (“So that's how he works so fast!” Penguinistas around the world are saying). Typically self-effacing, Ormandy made this simple announcement on Twitter (to a reception mixing admiration, humour, and horror):
  • Hacked in Translation – from Subtitles to Complete Takeover
    Check Point researchers revealed a new attack vector which threatens millions of users worldwide – attack by subtitles. By crafting malicious subtitle files, which are then downloaded by a victim’s media player, attackers can take complete control over any type of device via vulnerabilities found in many popular streaming platforms, including VLC, Kodi (XBMC), Popcorn-Time and strem.io. We estimate there are approximately 200 million video players and streamers that currently run the vulnerable software, making this one of the most widespread, easily accessed and zero-resistance vulnerability reported in recent years.
  • A Samba remote code execution vulnerability
    Distributors are already shipping the fix; there's also a workaround in the advisory for those who cannot update immediately.