Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OS

Solus Readies KDE Plasma Edition Testing ISO with Latest KDE Plasma 5.14 Desktop

Filed under
OS
KDE

After giving us the feature-rich and luxurious Budgie desktop, as well as dedicated editions with the GNOME and MATE desktop environments, the Solus Project now readies the Solus Plasma Edition, a special edition featuring the latest KDE Plasma desktop environment and related technologies.

An ISO image for the Solus Plasma Edition is now available for public testing, which you can download here, featuring the recently released KDE Plasma 5.14 desktop environment, along with the KDE Applications 18.08.2 and KDE Frameworks 5.51 open-source software suites, all built against the Qt 5.11.2 open-source software development framework.

Read more

RISC OS Liberated

Filed under
OS
OSS
  • Acorn Computer's RISC OS operating system finally goes fully open source

    RISC OS, the operating system that powered Acorn Computer's Archimedes computers in the 1980s and 1990s, has been fully released to open source.

    The move was welcomed by Raspberry Pi CEO Eben Upton: "RISC OS is a great demonstration of how much performance a well-tuned operating system and user interface can wring out of a platform. Moving to a free open source licence should bring a renewed interest to RISC OS."

    The shift to open source will enable the operating system to be used in new environments and markets, according to RISC OS Developments director Andrew Rawnsley. "This move unlocks a lot of opportunities for RISC OS that were previously inaccessible due to former licence restrictions. We look forward to seeing the exciting projects that this makes possible," said Rawnsley.

  • Roughly 30 years after its birth at UK's Acorn Computers, RISC OS 5 is going open source

    RISC OS was designed and developed by Acorn Computers, once dubbed the Apple of Britain, in the 1980s to run on the fledgling 32-bit Arm processor family, also designed by Acorn. Yes, the Arm that now powers the world's smartphones, embedded electronics, Internet-of-Things, and more, although it's come a long way since its mid-1980s genesis.

    The operating system, meanwhile, began life as the rough-around-the-edges Arthur 1.20 in 1987 for the ARM2-powered Archimedes A305 and A310, and by 1989, had morphed into the more slick RISC OS 2, written mostly in handcrafted assembly language for performance and memory-footprint reasons.

To BeOS or not to BeOS, that is the Haiku

Filed under
OS

Back in 2001, a new operating system arrived that promised to change the way users worked with their computers. That platform was BeOS and I remember it well. What I remember most about it was the desktop, and how much it looked and felt like my favorite window manager (at the time) AfterStep. I also remember how awkward and overly complicated BeOS was to install and use. In fact, upon installation, it was never all too clear how to make the platform function well enough to use on a daily basis. That was fine, however, because BeOS seemed to live in a perpetual state of “alpha release.”

Read more

Elementary OS 5.0 "Juno" Released For A Pleasant Linux Desktop Experience

Filed under
OS

Just ahead of Ubuntu 18.10, Solus 4, and Fedora 29 among other forthcoming Linux distribution releases, Elementary OS 5 "Juno" has been released for a polished desktop experience that aims to compete with macOS and Windows for desktop usability.

Elementary OS 5.0 "Juno" continues to be based upon Ubuntu for its package set but continues with its own Pantheon desktop environment and remains quite focused on delivering a polished desktop experience. With the 5.0 Juno release they focused on refining the user experience, improving productivity, and taking their developer platform to the next level.

Read more

Chrome OS Stable Channel Gets Linux Apps

Filed under
OS
Linux
Google

After months of user testing in developer and beta channels, the Crostini project at Google finally delivered the goods, Linux apps for most users of Chromebooks in the stable channel—definitely worth the wait. While this still is aimed primarily at developers using Chromebooks, I think there's a good chance these Linux apps will be used and enjoyed by the general public using Chromebooks as well. There's still a bit of a learning curve to overcome before that possibility is realized, but if you already are a user of any Linux distro, it will feel very familiar. Here's an overview of how to install it and what to expect afterward.

After getting the update to version 69, go to Settings and scroll down a bit, and you'll see the option to turn on Linux apps. Figure 1 shows this first step. Note that this isn't available on all Chromebooks; if you're using an older one, you'll have to wait a while before this function is available. If you don't see the option to turn on Linux apps, your Chromebook currently lacks that functionality. But, if you have a Chromebook produced in the past two years, you probably will see the option.

Read more

After 16 Years of Development, The First Beta of Haiku is Finally Here

Filed under
OS

Haiku’s history begins with the now defunct Be Inc. Be Inc was founded by former Apple executive Jean-Louis Gassée after he was ousted by CEO John Sculley. Gassée wanted to create a new operating system from the ground up. BeOS was created with digital media work in mind and was designed to take advantage of the most modern hardware of the time. Originally, Be Inc attempted to create their own platform encompassing both hardware and software. The result was called the BeBox. After BeBox failed to sell well, Be turned their attention to BeOS.

In the 1990s, Apple was looking for a new operating system to replace the aging Classic Mac OS. The two contenders were Gassée’s BeOS and Steve Jobs’ NeXTSTEP. In the end, Apple went with NeXTSTEP. Be tried to license BeOS to hardware makers, but in at least one case Microsoft threatened to revoke a manufacturer’s Windows license if they sold BeOS machines. Eventually, Be Inc was sold to Palm in 2001 for $11 million. BeOS was subsequently discontinued.

Read more

“Made By Google” Event

Filed under
OS
Android
Google

First VyOS 1.2.0 release candidate is available for download

Filed under
OS

This month, the VyOS project turns five years old. In these five years, VyOS has been through highs and lows, up to speculation that the project is dead. Past year has been full of good focused work by the core team and community contributors, but the only way to make use of that work was to use nightly builds, and nightly builds are like a chocolate box a box of WWI era shells—you never know if it blows up when handled or not. Now the codebase has stabilized, and we are ready to present a release candidate. While it has some rough edges, a number of people, including us, are already using recent builds of VyOS 1.2.0 in production, and now it's time to make it public.

Read more

Update on /e/ (Formerly Eelo, Android Without Google) and Android/Google News

Filed under
OS
Android

Qubes OS 3.2.1-rc1 has been released!

Filed under
OS
Security

We’re pleased to announce the first release candidate for Qubes 3.2.1! This is the first and only planned point release for version 3.2. Features:

Fedora 28 TemplateVM
Debian 9 TemplateVM
Whonix 14 Gateway and Workstation TemplateVMs
Linux kernel 4.14

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.20--rc76

Well, that's more like it. This is a *tiny* rc7, just how I like it. Maybe it's because everybody is too busy prepping for the holidays, and maybe it's because we simply are doing well. Regardless, it's been a quiet week, and I hope the trend continues. The patch looks pretty small too, although it's skewed by a couple of bigger fixes (re-apply i915 workarounds after reset, and dm zoned bio completion fix). Other than that it's mainly all pretty small, and spread out (usual bulk of drivers, but some arch updates, filesystem fixes, core fixes, test updates..) Read more Also: Linux 4.20-rc7 Kernel Released - Linux 4.20 Should Be Released In Time For Christmas

Android Leftovers

1080p Linux Gaming Performance - NVIDIA 415.22 vs. Mesa 19.0-devel RADV/RadeonSI

Stemming from the recent Radeon RX 590 Linux gaming benchmarks were some requests to see more 1080p gaming benchmarks, so here's that article with the low to medium tier graphics cards from the NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon line-up while using the latest graphics drivers on Ubuntu 18.10. This round of benchmarking was done with the GeForce GTX 980, GTX 1060, GTX 1070, and GTX 1070 Ti using the newest 415.22 proprietary graphics driver. On the AMD side was using the patched Linux 4.20 kernel build (for RX 590 support) paired with Mesa 19.0-devel via the Padoka PPA while testing the Radeon RX 580 and RX 590. Read more

Sparky SU 0.1.0

This tool provides Yad based front-end for su (spsu) allowing users to give a password and run graphical commands as root without needing to invoke su in a terminal emulator. It can be used as a Gksu replacement to run any application as root. Read more