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SemiCode OS — New Linux Distro For Programmers And Web Developers

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OS
Linux

Very often Linux enthusiasts complain regarding the fragmentation due to hundreds of distributions. Each distribution has its own libraries, kernel configuration, pre-installed software, etc. However, the same variety makes Linux unique. Every person can create his/her own Linux distro and customize it.

If we take a look at the vast list of various Linux distributions, there are specialized solutions for hackers, power users, artists, and gamers. But, there’s a dearth of distros that claim to serve the unique needs of programmers, probably, because most Linux-based operating systems are customizable and a developers can install all the useful tools in no time.

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Make Ubuntu Work Like ChromeOS

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OS
Ubuntu

It might surprise some of you that with a little effort, you can make Ubuntu work like ChromeOS. Best of all, you can do so and still keep Ubuntu's advantages. In this article, I'll share some tips and thoughts on how you can run Ubuntu with similar features to those found in ChromeOS.

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Release for CentOS Linux 7 (1611) on x86_64

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OS
Linux

I am pleased to announce the general availability of CentOS Linux 7
(1611) for 64 bit x86 compatible machines.

Effectively immediately, this is the current release for CentOS Linux
7 and is tagged as 1611, derived from Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3

As always, read through the Release Notes at :
http://wiki.centos.org/Manuals/ReleaseNotes/CentOS7 - these notes
contain important information about the release and details about some
of the content inside the release from the CentOS QA team. These notes
are updated constantly to include issues and incorporate feedback from
the users.

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Alo: CentOS Linux 7 "1611" Released

Compute like it's 1989

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OS
GNU
Linux

For many of us, when we look around at the state of computing in 2016, we nod and think, "Yes, today is what I expected when I thought about what The Future would be like." Sure, we haven't got flying cars yet, but today's technology is flashy. We swipe fingers across screens instead of pressing buttons, and I'm told we are all very excited about all of the latest virtual reality headsets and augmented reality gadgets.

So now seems as good a time as any to look back at how people of the past used to compute, and back to the days when a "desktop" computer was so called because it took up 80 percent of your desktop. The days when the term "computer" actually meant "a machine for computation."

Why bother looking back 30-year-old computing? After all, the computers back then were clunky, slow, and awkward, weren't they? Sure, they were, but the great thing about living in The Future is that we have the power to look back at the Old Ways and cherry pick information from them for modern technology. The truth is, there's power in simplicity, and old computing was simple out of necessity.

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CoreOS renames core OS to Container Linux

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OS

CoreOS has renamed its Linux distribution from CoreOS to Container Linux. That name change accompanies its Tectonic Summit in New York, but the big news is around self-driving Kubernetes, something the company’s CEO said will help smooth security woes for users.

The name change was designed to help draw a clearer line between the company’s name and the container-hosting Linux distribution and open-source project at the heart of the company’s platform.

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Refracta 8.0 is an 'average' Linux distro, that's what's great about it

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OS
GNU
Linux

With what amounts to literally hundreds of Linux distributions out there, Refracta version 8.0 and its suitability for the so-called “average user” might just be what makes it an above average contender.

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New Smartwatch OS Debuts on GitHub

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OS

Can a new smartwatch operating system based on Linux breathe some new life into the smart wearables market? Florent Revest hopes so.

Revest, a French computer science student, on Wednesday announced the alpha release of AsteroidOS, an open source operating system that will run on several Android smartwatch models.

"Many users believe that the current proprietary platforms can not guarantee a satisfactory level of control over their privacy and hardware," noted Revest, who has been working on his OS for two years. "Hence, I noticed a need for an open wearable platform and AsteroidOS is my attempt to address this issue."

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AsteroidOS is an open source project that wants to save your smartwatch from obsolescence

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OS
OSS

Android was once the darling of the open source community, though you'd be forgiven for forgetting that - these days its commercial elements seem to be all that make the news. One developer is hoping that community can save the smartwatch, or at the very least, breathe a little new life into existing designs. Florent Revest, a French computer science student, released the 1.0 alpha version of AsteroidOS today. It's ready to run on multiple Android Wear devices: the original LG G Watch, the Watch Urbane, the Asus ZenWatch 2, and the Sony Smartwatch 3.

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Also: AteroidOS Alpha released: open source smartwatch operating system

Kodi-Based LibreELEC 8.0 "Krypton" Sees New Alpha Powered by Linux Kernel 4.8.12

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OS
Linux

The development of the open-source and platform-independent LibreELEC (Libre Embedded Linux Entertainment Center) operating system based on the latest Kodi media center software received a new Alpha milestone on December 6, 2016.

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Zorin OS 12 Ubuntu-based Linux distribution now available -- a Windows 10 alternative

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OS
Ubuntu

Windows 10 is a really great desktop operating system, but it is not for everyone. For those that care deeply about security and privacy, an open source Linux-based operating system is a wise alternative. The problem? Learning a new user interface can be hard for some. If you have always used a Windows OS in the past, moving to a desktop environment like GNOME or Unity can be confusing and scary.

Luckily, for those that have difficulty with change, there are some Linux-based operating systems that are designed for Windows-switchers. One fairly popular such offering, Zorin OS, has now reached version 12. It is designed to be familiar to former users of Microsoft's OS. While the company does charge for an "Ultimate" version, the "Core" edition of Zorin OS 12 is entirely free.

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today's howtos

Leftovers: Software

  • HandBrake 1.0.2 Open-Source Video Transcoder Released for Linux, Mac and Windows
    After more than 13 years of development, the HandBrake open-source video transcoding app reached 1.0 milestone on Christmas Eve last year, and the second bugfix release is already available. HandBrake 1.0.2 is full of improvements and bug fixes enhancing the out-of-the-box video, audio, and subtitles support, but also adds various platform specific changes for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.
  • SMPlayer 17.1 Open-Source Video Player Introduces Chromecast Support, More
    It's been two and a half months since you last updated your SMPlayer open-source video player, and a new stable release is now available, versioned 17.1, with some exciting features. Sporting initial Chromecast support, SMPlayer 17.1 will let you send video files from your personal computer to your Chromecast device to watch them on your big-screen TV, or your friends for that matter. The feature supports both online and local sources, including those from popular video hosting services like YouTube and Vimeo.
  • Firefox 51 Released with FLAC Support, Better CPU Usage
    A new month means a new release of the venerable Mozilla Firefox web browser. Firefox 51 ships with FLAC support, WebGL 2, and a whole heap more — come see!
  • Mozilla Firefox 51.0 Now Available for Download, Supports FLAC Playback, WebGL 2
    It's not yet official, but the binary and source packages of the Firefox 51.0 web browser are now available for download on your GNU/Linux, macOS, or Microsoft Windows operating system. Mozilla will have the pleasure of unveiling the Firefox 51.0 release tomorrow, January 24, according to the official schedule, but you can already get your hands on the final version of the web browser by downloading the installers for your favorite OS right now from our website (links are at the end of the article).

OSS Leftovers

  • Berkeley launches RISELab, enabling computers to make intelligent real-time decisions
  • Amazon, Google, Huawei, and Microsoft sponsor UC Berkeley RISELab, AMPLab's successor
  • Brotli: A new compression algorithm for faster Internet
    Brotli is a new open source compression algorithm designed to enable an Internet that's faster for users. Modern web pages can often be made up of dozens of megabytes of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, and that's before accounting for images, videos, or other large file content, which all makes for hefty downloads. Such loads are why pages are transferred in compressed formats; they significantly reduce the time required between a website visitor requesting a web page and that page appearing fully loaded on the screen and ready for use. While the Brotli algorithm was announced by Google in September 2015, only recently have the majority of web browsers have adopted it. The HTTP servers Apache and nginx now offer Brotli compression as an option. Besides Google, other commercial vendors (such as Cloudflare and DreamHost) have begun to deploy support for Brotli as well.
  • New Year’s resolution: Donate to 1 free software project every month
    Free and open source software is an absolutely critical part of our world—and the future of technology and computing. One problem that consistently plagues many free software projects, though, is the challenge of funding ongoing development (and support and documentation). With that in mind, I have finally settled on a New Year’s resolution for 2017: to donate to one free software project (or group) every month—or the whole year. After all, these projects are saving me a boatload of money because I don’t need to buy expensive, proprietary packages to accomplish the same things.
  • Toyota and Ford Promote Open Source Smartphone Interfaces
    Ford and Toyota have formed a four-automaker consortium to speed up the deployment of open source software for connected in-car systems, according to a report by Bloomberg. The SmartDeviceLink Consortium, which includes Mazda, PSA Group, Fuji, and Suzuki, aims to prevent Apple and Google from controlling how drivers connect smartphones to their vehicles. Suppliers Elektrobit, Harma, Luxoft, QNX, and Xevo have also joined the organization, which is named after an open source version of Ford’s AppLink connectivity interface, a system used in over 5 million vehicles globally.
  • What your code repository says about you
    "You only get one chance to make a first impression," the old saying goes. It's cliche, but nevertheless sound, practical advice. In the realm of open source, it can make the difference between a project that succeeds and a project that fails. That's why making a positive first impression when you release a repo to the world is essential—at least if your motivations involve gaining users, building a community of contributors, and attracting valuable feedback.
  • The Open Source Way of Reaching Across Languages
    I don’t speak Spanish, but that doesn’t mean I can’t learn some important things from this video. The visuals alone are quite instructive. At my public library job, I mentor a number of wonderful Latino youth. One of them might ask me about open source CAD software — and I’ll direct them right to this FOSS Force article. Of course, I subscribed to the YouTube channel of the creator of this video, and also clicked on its like button. If the screencast creator comes back to look at this video in February, they’ll find that they have a number of new subscribers, a number of likes for the video and the video view count might be more than 100. All those indicators will be encouragement for them to make their next open source screencast. And so it goes. That’s how we support each other in the open source world.
  • School systems desperate for standards-aligned curricula find hope
    Open Up Resources is a nonprofit collaborative formed by 13 U.S. states that creates high-quality, standards-aligned open educational resources (OERs) that are openly licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0. Unlike other providers, Open Up Resources provides curriculum-scale OER options; they believe that while many people seem to know where to find supplemental materials, most curriculum directors would not know where to look if they were planning a textbook adoption next year.
  • Visual Studio Test joins Microsoft's open source push [Ed: More openwashing of proprietary software from Microsoft, which interjects surveillance into compiled code]
  • Microsoft Open-Sources DirectX Shader Compiler [Ed: Windows lock-in.]

Red Hat's Survey in India