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Open-Xchange Announces Comprehensive Feature Upgrade for Community Edition

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Open-Xchange, Inc. today released a comprehensive feature update for the community edition of Open-Xchange Server -- adding more than 100 improvements in the usability and integration capabilities of the leading open source collaboration software and also released the core content under a Creative Commons Deed.

Mac, Windows, lock in, Linux, freedom, got it?

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The Windows on a Mac story just seems to be one that refuses to go away. It seems that the whole world is going cock-a-hoop and doing back flips over the new-found ability of the Intel Mac to run Windows natively. What few seem to be saying is that it’s a crock.

Open Solaris a source of contention

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LINUX distributor Novell has taken a shot at open-source rival Sun, saying the company's moves to open the code on its Solaris operating system had added little to the open-source community.

Smoke, mirrors, SCO

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I always thought that SCO would have something to show the court with its claims that IBM, or its subsidiary Sequent, violated its Unix licensing contracts in 217 separate areas.

I was wrong.

Interview with Gentoo/*BSD developer

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Interviews

For those of you who don't know Gentoo/BSD is a relatively unheard-of project with aims of merging both Gentoo Linux and the BSD systems respectively into one operating system. The project, which is sponsored by Gentoo Linux, has goals of creating a hybrid operating system using BSD underlyings, such as the kernel and system libraries, with Gentoo's portage system, administration facilities and design principles integrated on top.

The ultimate solution

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By now everyone has probably heard that Microsofts solution for computer malware is a complete wipe and reload of the operating system. Now, as extreme as it sounds, it isn't completely out of the realm of the reasonable. Of course, most people will argue that you can avoid the, seemingly, unending security problems and exploits that are famously associated with Windows by simply switching to another operating system. But, the solution may be a little more involved than either of those two choices.

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GCC 8.3 Released and GCC 9 Plans

  • GCC 8.3 Released
    The GNU Compiler Collection version 8.3 has been released. GCC 8.3 is a bug-fix release from the GCC 8 branch containing important fixes for regressions and serious bugs in GCC 8.2 with more than 153 bugs fixed since the previous release. This release is available from the FTP servers listed at: http://www.gnu.org/order/ftp.html Please do not contact me directly regarding questions or comments about this release. Instead, use the resources available from http://gcc.gnu.org. As always, a vast number of people contributed to this GCC release -- far too many to thank them individually!
  • GCC 8.3 Released With 153 Bug Fixes
    While the GCC 9 stable compiler release is a few weeks away in the form of GCC 9.1, the GNU Compiler Collection is up to version 8.3.0 today as their newest point release to last year's GCC 8 series.
  • GCC 9 Compiler Picks Up Official Support For The Arm Neoverse N1 + E1
    Earlier this week Arm announced their next-generation Neoverse N1 and E1 platforms with big performance potential and power efficiency improvements over current generation Cortex-A72 processor cores. The GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) ahead of the upcoming GCC9 release has picked up support for the Neoverse N1/E1. This newly-added Neoverse N1 and E1 CPU support for GCC9 isn't all that surprising even with the very short time since announcement and GCC9 being nearly out the door... Arm developers had already been working on (and landed) the Arm "Ares" CPU support, which is the codename for what is now the Neoverse platform.

Android Leftovers

5 Linux GUI Cloud Backup Tools

We have reached a point in time where most every computer user depends upon the cloud … even if only as a storage solution. What makes the cloud really important to users, is when it’s employed as a backup. Why is that such a game changer? By backing up to the cloud, you have access to those files, from any computer you have associated with your cloud account. And because Linux powers the cloud, many services offer Linux tools. Let’s take a look at five such tools. I will focus on GUI tools, because they offer a much lower barrier to entry to many of the CLI tools. I’ll also be focusing on various, consumer-grade cloud services (e.g., Google Drive, Dropbox, Wasabi, and pCloud). And, I will be demonstrating on the Elementary OS platform, but all of the tools listed will function on most Linux desktop distributions. Read more