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Google
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DataWind PocketSurfer GZ smartphone with Linux OS launched at Rs 1,499

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OS
Linux

DataWind has launched its PocketSurfer GZ smartphone in India. Priced at Rs 1,499, the handset is powered by Linux operating system. DataWind has partnered with Reliance Communications for the device. Consequently, the PocketSurfer GZ comes bundled with RCom's offerings which will enable users to enjoy free internet access for a year.

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Solus Upgraded to the GNOME 3.20 Stack, Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.7

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OS
Linux

Solus developer Joshua Strobl proudly announced the 33rd installation of Solus Project's This Week in Solus weekly newsletter to inform the community about the latest technologies and software releases implemented in the OS.

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blackPanther OS 16.1 "Silent Killer" Arrives After a Year with Linux Kernel 4.7

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OS
GNU
Linux

It has been more than a year since we last heard something from the development team of the blackPanther OS GNU/Linux distribution, who had the great pleasure of announcing this past weekend the release of blackPanther OS 16.1.

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Gorgeous Apricity OS Gets Its First Stable Release, Based on Arch Linux

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OS
Linux

Apricity OS maintainer Alex Gajewski has proudly informed Softpedia about the availability of the first stable release of his gorgeous Arch Linux-based computer operating system.

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Exton|OS Light Now Based on Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS, but Powered by Linux Kernel 4.6

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OS
Ubuntu

GNU/Linux developer Arne Exton has released a new version of his Ubuntu-based Exton|OS operating system, build 160728. The Exton|OS Light edition has been updated, which uses the Openbox window manager.

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Understanding the difference: Linux rolling releases versus point releases

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OS
GNU
Linux

That's it for now. As I said the last time I wrote about KaOS, if you are looking for a smaller Linux distribution, and KDE Plasma is your desktop of choice, and you don't mind using QupZilla instead of Firefox or Chrome (or you don't mind installing your browser of choice from the KaOS repositories), and you don't mind using Calligra instead of LibreOffice (or you don't mind installing LibreOffice), then KaOS is definitely worth a try. It's a good distribution and it just keeps getting better and better. The KaOS developers have shown an admirable ability to maintain their focus on what they originally said they wanted to do.

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Homegrown Budgie Desktop Shows Off the Beauty - and Beastliness - of Solus Simplicity

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OS
Reviews

The Budgie desktop -- and thus Solus itself -- lacks the glitz and glitter found in more seasoned desktop environments. Animation is nonexistent. It also lacks any right-click menu finesse other than the ability to change background or settings.

The Solus Project's distro is very user-friendly, but experienced Linux users will need more optimized software and desktop functionality in the next release to be tempted to give up more advanced desktop flavors.

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KaOS 2016.07 Adds KDE Plasma 5.7.2 and Linux Kernel 4.6, July's Software Updates

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OS
Development

The KaOS development team proudly announced the release of the KaOS 2016.07 ISO refresh for the month of July, bringing all the goodies that have been pushed to the main software repositories of the rolling release operating system since June 2016.

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Cyanogen OS vs Android: what’s the difference?

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OS
Android

It may have started as Google’s obligatory answer to the iPhone, but Android has grown into a much-beloved operating system that’s currently used by over 107 million people in the U.S. alone and almost one-and-a-half billion worldwide. Much of what makes Android special also distinguishes it from competitors: its power, versatility, and customizability.

But this isn’t a love ode to Google’s popular software. Instead, we’re going to discuss some of the key differences between Google’s Android and Cyanogen OS, a modified, third-party version of Android that brings added features and gives users additional control over their devices. So let’s jump right in.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • GJS: What’s next?
    In my last post, I went into detail about all the new stuff that GJS brought to GNOME 3.24. Now, it’s time to talk about the near future: what GJS will bring to GNOME 3.26.
  • Sending SMS from Linux Just Got Easier with Latest Indicator KDE Connect Update
    Indicator KDE Connect now has Google Contacts integration, making it even easier to send text messages from the Linux desktop.
  • Cumulus Qt is a Lightweight Weather App for Linux
    Cumulus Qt is a Qt weather app for the Linux desktop. It's lightweight, has a bold, striking design inspired by Stormcloud, and is very customisable.
  • Vivaldi 1.10 Browser Now in Development, Will Introduce Docked Developer Tools
    Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard just informed us a few moments ago that Vivaldi 1.10 will be the next major version of the free and cross-platform web browser based on the latest Chromium technologies, not Vivaldi 2.0 as many of you have hoped. Vivaldi 1.9 just hit the streets the other day as world's first web browser to ship with the Ecosia search engine enabled by default to help reforest the plane, and it now looks like Vivaldi's devs never sleep, and development of Vivaldi 1.10 starts today with the first snapshot, Vivaldi 1.10.829.3, which introduces a long-anticipated feature: Docked Developer Tools!

today's howtos

Fedora: The Latest (Flatpak, Wallpapers, and PHP)

  • Flatpak and Snaps aren't destined for graveyard of failed Linux tech yet
    The world of Linux has long been divided into tribes, or distros as we called them. But what actually makes a distro? The packages it uses? The people who put those packages together? The philosophy behind the choices the people who put the packages together make? The question of what makes a distro is actually very difficult on to answer and it's about to get even more difficult. There's a change coming to the world of Linux that's potentially big enough to make us rethink what a distro is and how it works. That change is Ubuntu's Snap packages and the parallel effort dubbed Flatpaks. While these two projects differ in the details, for the purposes of this article I'll consider them the same thing and use the terms interchangeably.
  • Need a New Wallpaper? Fedora 26 Has You Covered!
    Fedora 26 will ship with a stunning set of community-contributed wallpapers, and as ever, the standard of entries in the contest is incredibly high.
  • Fedora 26 will look awesome with supplemental wallpapers
  • PHP version 7.0.19RC1 and 7.1.5RC1

Tizen and Android