Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

OS

Difference Between Linux And BSD | Open Source Operating Systems

Filed under
OS
Linux
OSS
BSD

When you start to get out of the Windows ecosystem, the very first thing you see is macOS. But, chances are less that you may go for it, mostly because of the price tag. Moving further, you come across Linux flaunting its open source badge. Most people confuse Linux as an operating system and it has been a topic of controversy for a long time. Thus, some people refer a Linux operating system as GNU/Linux.

Soon, you start realizing how diverse is the Linux ecosystem with numerous Linux distributions and their derivatives. You almost believe that Linux and its family is the representative of the open source community. But there is a lesser-known family of operating systems known as the BSD (Berkeley Software Distribution), which also counts as one of the major names in the open source community.

Read more

Q4OS - Part 4 - Life Without Windows

Filed under
OS

The point of this series is to work out whether I can truly ditch Windows and use Q4OS as my sole operating system.

All of the office features I need are available in LibreOffice so for the most part I don't need Microsoft Office at all.

The only thing I need Microsoft Office, or should I say Microsoft Word for is to make sure the formatting of my CV is correct and I can use the online version of Microsoft Word for that.

The mission of living life without Windows is still very much on the go. Q4OS is extremely stable. As well as working out the Office stuff I have also used it to watch Breaking Bad on Netflix and for researching and writing the articles at Lifewire.com.

There is only one more snag. I am a software developer and I develop Windows software. I will show you how I am overcoming that snag next week.

Read more

SemiCode OS — New Linux Distro For Programmers And Web Developers

Filed under
OS
Linux

Very often Linux enthusiasts complain regarding the fragmentation due to hundreds of distributions. Each distribution has its own libraries, kernel configuration, pre-installed software, etc. However, the same variety makes Linux unique. Every person can create his/her own Linux distro and customize it.

If we take a look at the vast list of various Linux distributions, there are specialized solutions for hackers, power users, artists, and gamers. But, there’s a dearth of distros that claim to serve the unique needs of programmers, probably, because most Linux-based operating systems are customizable and a developers can install all the useful tools in no time.

Read more

Make Ubuntu Work Like ChromeOS

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu

It might surprise some of you that with a little effort, you can make Ubuntu work like ChromeOS. Best of all, you can do so and still keep Ubuntu's advantages. In this article, I'll share some tips and thoughts on how you can run Ubuntu with similar features to those found in ChromeOS.

Read more

Release for CentOS Linux 7 (1611) on x86_64

Filed under
OS
Linux

I am pleased to announce the general availability of CentOS Linux 7
(1611) for 64 bit x86 compatible machines.

Effectively immediately, this is the current release for CentOS Linux
7 and is tagged as 1611, derived from Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3

As always, read through the Release Notes at :
http://wiki.centos.org/Manuals/ReleaseNotes/CentOS7 - these notes
contain important information about the release and details about some
of the content inside the release from the CentOS QA team. These notes
are updated constantly to include issues and incorporate feedback from
the users.

Read more

Alo: CentOS Linux 7 "1611" Released

Compute like it's 1989

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux

For many of us, when we look around at the state of computing in 2016, we nod and think, "Yes, today is what I expected when I thought about what The Future would be like." Sure, we haven't got flying cars yet, but today's technology is flashy. We swipe fingers across screens instead of pressing buttons, and I'm told we are all very excited about all of the latest virtual reality headsets and augmented reality gadgets.

So now seems as good a time as any to look back at how people of the past used to compute, and back to the days when a "desktop" computer was so called because it took up 80 percent of your desktop. The days when the term "computer" actually meant "a machine for computation."

Why bother looking back 30-year-old computing? After all, the computers back then were clunky, slow, and awkward, weren't they? Sure, they were, but the great thing about living in The Future is that we have the power to look back at the Old Ways and cherry pick information from them for modern technology. The truth is, there's power in simplicity, and old computing was simple out of necessity.

Read more

CoreOS renames core OS to Container Linux

Filed under
OS

CoreOS has renamed its Linux distribution from CoreOS to Container Linux. That name change accompanies its Tectonic Summit in New York, but the big news is around self-driving Kubernetes, something the company’s CEO said will help smooth security woes for users.

The name change was designed to help draw a clearer line between the company’s name and the container-hosting Linux distribution and open-source project at the heart of the company’s platform.

Read more

Refracta 8.0 is an 'average' Linux distro, that's what's great about it

Filed under
OS
GNU
Linux

With what amounts to literally hundreds of Linux distributions out there, Refracta version 8.0 and its suitability for the so-called “average user” might just be what makes it an above average contender.

Read more

New Smartwatch OS Debuts on GitHub

Filed under
OS

Can a new smartwatch operating system based on Linux breathe some new life into the smart wearables market? Florent Revest hopes so.

Revest, a French computer science student, on Wednesday announced the alpha release of AsteroidOS, an open source operating system that will run on several Android smartwatch models.

"Many users believe that the current proprietary platforms can not guarantee a satisfactory level of control over their privacy and hardware," noted Revest, who has been working on his OS for two years. "Hence, I noticed a need for an open wearable platform and AsteroidOS is my attempt to address this issue."

Read more

AsteroidOS is an open source project that wants to save your smartwatch from obsolescence

Filed under
OS
OSS

Android was once the darling of the open source community, though you'd be forgiven for forgetting that - these days its commercial elements seem to be all that make the news. One developer is hoping that community can save the smartwatch, or at the very least, breathe a little new life into existing designs. Florent Revest, a French computer science student, released the 1.0 alpha version of AsteroidOS today. It's ready to run on multiple Android Wear devices: the original LG G Watch, the Watch Urbane, the Asus ZenWatch 2, and the Sony Smartwatch 3.

Read more

Also: AteroidOS Alpha released: open source smartwatch operating system

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

OSS: PC-MOS, Open Source Initiative, ErosCoin, Rackspace

  • PC-MOS operating system goes open source (30 years after release)
    These days if you’re using a desktop computer you’re probably running Windows, although there’s also a good chance you’re using OS X or maybe Chrome OS or one of a number of GNU/Linux distributions. But back in the 80s, it’s wasn’t really clear who the dominant players of the future would be.
  • MS-DOS variant PC-MOS/386 reborn as open source
    Do you still long to run WordPerfect 5.1, Lotus 1-2-3 4, or Doom on DOS? Well, if you do, there's a new way to revisit the PC world of the 1980s: The newly open-sourced PC-MOS/386 v501. PC-MOS, for those who weren't around in 1987, was a multi-user MS-DOS clone by Norcross, GA's The Software Link. It ran most standard DOS and 386's protected mode applications. I reviewed it back in the day -- although I can't find my article from Computer Digest, a Washington DC regional general interest computer newspaper, I recall it worked well.
  • Open Source Initiative, and Open Source Software Movement Celebrate Twenty Years
    The Open Source Initiative® (OSI), the global non-profit dedicated to raising awareness and adoption of open source software, announced today plans for the “Open Source 20th Anniversary World Tour” to run through 2018. Open source software is now ubiquitous, recognized across industries as a fundamental component to infrastructure, as well as a critical factor for driving innovation. Over the past twenty years, the OSI has worked to promote and protect open source software, development, and communities, championing software freedom in society through education, collaboration, and infrastructure, stewarding the Open Source Definition (OSD), and preventing abuse of the ideals and ethos inherent to the open source movement.
  • ErosCoin – An open source solution for blockchain payment industries
    Possibly the largest single factor currently holding cryptocurrencies back from mass adoption is their difficulty of use for the average person. While Bitcoin and Ethereum both provide the ability to transfer value quickly and securely without borders, they both suffer from a steep learning curve, which limits interest from merchants, consumers and payment providers, and restricts growth of their platforms. EROSCOIN is setting out to create a new blockchain that is very significantly differentiated from other existing cryptocurrencies, giving the industry a payment solution that can help to expand the ecosystem and expand user adoption.
  • 7 years of open source: Cloud Foundry, DiffBlue & Quest
  • Rackspace kills discount cloud hosting for open source projects
    Rackspace has announced it will no longer be offering discounts on hosting for open source projects, although it will only apply to new customers rather than those with projects already up and running on the platform.

KDE: Text Input For Every Use, Kdenlive, KDE Promo Activity

Ninite – Install Or Update Multiple Apps Together On Windows

One big problem with Windows is searching and installing software. Here we do not have a Play Store like Android or an App Store like IOS. We have to manually go to the software’s website, download it and install it. Read
more

today's howtos