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OS

elementary OS 6 Promises New Look and Feel, New Installer, and More

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OS

elementary OS 6 is under heavy development these days, and developer Cassidy James Blaede shared today some of the work that’s going on behind the curtains. He just revealed in a blog post a part of the major changes coming to elementary OS 6, due for release later this year.

First and foremost, elementary OS 6 promises a new look and feel. What’s changing beside the default wallpaper? Well, the typography and the system stylesheet, which apparently affects almost everything on the system, from the panel and default apps to all curated apps in the AppCenter.

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Pantheon Desktop Review: A Beautiful Alternative to macOS

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OS
Reviews

The Pantheon Desktop is designed specifically for elementaryOS and is considered one of the most visually appealing desktops around. It clearly draws a lot of inspiration from macOS, which makes it a great alternative for those who are looking to make the switch or who have always wanted to master that workflow. In this Pantheon Desktop review, I take a look at user experience and performance, as well as some notable features, and deciding who should use the Pantheon desktop.

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Review: Haiku R1 beta 2

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OS
OSS
Reviews

Haiku is an open-source operating system that specifically targets personal computing. Inspired by the Be Operating System (BeOS), Haiku aims to be fast, efficient, simple to use, and easy to learn. It is specifically geared toward desktop usage and maintaining a responsive desktop environment.

The Haiku project has been, to date, in perpetual development mode. Which is to say the releases to date have been labelled as being alpha or beta releases. I mention this because while the version label is R1 beta 2, the platform should probably be regarded a relatively mature project with the benefit of nearly 20 years of development behind it.

The R1 beta 2 release includes a number of new features such as improved font scaling and HiDPI support, along with the ability to work with mouse devices that offer more than three buttons. More applications have been ported and are now available through the project's software manager. The installer has mostly remained the same, however users can now exclude the installation of optional packages while setting up Haiku. New driver support has been added and there are some new options for keeping the Deskbar (a sort of combined desktop panel and system tray) out of the way.

The project's latest release is available in 32-bit (x86) and 64-bit (x86_64) builds. There are also builds for ARM, PowerPC, m68k, and SPARC architectures, however these builds are considered to be unsupported. I downloaded the 64-bit build which is available as a 955MB ZIP file. Unpacking the ZIP file presents us with a 1,108MB (1GB) ISO file we can write to optical media or a thumb drive.

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20 CentOS Server Hardening Security Tips – Part 1

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OS
Red Hat

This tutorial only covers general security tips for CentOS 8/7 which can be used to harden the system. The checklist tips are intended to be used mostly on various types of bare-metal servers or on machines (physical or virtual) that provide network services.

However, some of the tips can be successfully applied to general-purpose machines too, such as Desktops, Laptops, and card-sized single-board computers (Raspberry Pi).

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Also: 23 CentOS Server Hardening Security Tips – Part 2

GeckoLinux ROLLING 999.200729 released

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OS
Linux
News
SUSE

GeckoLinux is pleased to announce the 999.200729 update to its ROLLING editions, thus completing the current refresh cycle of the entire GeckoLinux lineup. GeckoLinux ROLLING spins are generated directly from unmodified openSUSE Tumbleweed and Packman repositories, and the installed system can be updated directly from those official sources. This design decision has allowed GeckoLinux ROLLING users to install and update their systems in a constant rolling fashion over the past two years from the cutting edge and highly stable openSUSE Tumbleweed distribution. Now, GeckoLinux users that need an installation ISO to support very new hardware will find what they need in the GeckoLinux ROLLING 999.200729 set of updated spins.

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A Guide to the Endless OS for Linux

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OS
Linux

Many find the idea of switching to Linux intimidating. Let’s face it: despite being the most-used operating system for servers, it’s yet to see major commercial and consumer use. This is mostly because there still aren’t many off-the-shelf computers that have Linux pre-installed, and most people don’t want to deal with the hassle of installing a new OS. After all, you’ll have to worry about so much more – most notably, app and driver compatibility.

Luckily, the latest version of Endless OS presents us with solutions to many of our concerns. Released on May 18, Endless OS 3.8.1 is the latest version of this Debian-based OS initially introduced to the public back in 2014. Like its previous versions, Endless OS 3.8.1 comes with a lot of digital literacy initiatives that make computing easier than ever before.

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GeckoLinux NEXT Plasma 152.200726 update

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OS
KDE
Linux
News
SUSE

Hi everyone, I'm pleased to announce another update to the GeckoLinux NEXT Plasma edition. The purpose of this edition is not to replace the regular GeckoLinux STATIC Plasma release, but rather as an alternative for those who want the latest Plasma and KDE packages on top of a stable openSUSE Leap base. This is achieved thanks to some additional openSUSE OBS repositories, together with the polished GeckoLinux configuration for the Plasma desktop.

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Here Is Why Linux Is a Good Choice of OS for Software Developers

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OS
Linux

Is there a perfect operating system for software development? According to some, Linux might just be as close as you can get.

Here we will take a quick look at what Linux has to offer and also suggest some great Linux distros that you might want to check out for yourself.

Since you're actually reading this article, chances are you already have an idea of what Linux is. But for the uninitiated, Linux is a type of an operating system just like Windows, iOS, macOS, etc.

It is a very popular OS. In fact, the Andriod operating system is built on top of the Linux kernel, so you could say that the Linux kernel is the foundation on which Android is built. But Linux also powers many other internet and business servers, including numerous stock exchanges around the world. It has been around since the mid-1990s, give or take, and Linux is literally everywhere today.

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Linux can bring your old PC or Mac back to life -- for free

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OS
GNU
Linux

Have you heard of Linux? It's a version of Unix developed by a Finn, Linus Torvalds. But what is Unix? It's a computer operating system developed by Bell Labs in the 1960s. What was Bell Labs? It was the research arm of Bell Telephone Co.
Unix lives on and we all use it just about every day. Every time we insert a dot (a period) inside something we type on the computer, like a .com, .org, or .gov, it is a Unix command to go to that location in its memory banks and find what came before the dot. Unix ran the big mainframe computers that used to fill large rooms; they had to be specially air-conditioned because of the heat generated by these huge machines. Torvald wanted a similar, free version of the system, so he rewrote it. A co-worker named it Linux, and the name stuck despite Torvalds' objection on grounds that it sounded egotistical.
Linux can run on just about anything. Got an old PC or Mac gathering dust at the back of the closet? You can load Linux into it and it will live again. It's relatively trouble-free and comes in 20 flavors, each with a slightly different look. The most common is called Ubuntu, the latest flavor of which is named after a cat in Madagascar. But a reader wrote to say that he favors Linux Mint because it's similar to the Mac operating system. He installs it for schools and nonprofit organizations for $5 per machine.
You can run Linux and keep your old operating system at the same time in one of two ways: Create a partition on your Windows PC and get an option to start up in either Windows or Linux. Linux will usually set this up automatically. The other way is to load Linux on a thumb drive and plug it in.

Read more (Ed: Really not accurate in a lot of places, but there we have it...)

GNU Guix: Improve Internationalization Support for the Guix Data Service

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OS
GNU

The first half of my Outreachy internship is already over and I am really excited to share my experience. Over the past weeks I’ve had the opportunity to work on the Guix Data Service, watch myself change, and accomplish way more than I thought I would.

The Guix Data Service processes, stores and provides data about Guix over time. It provides a complementary interface to Guix itself by having a web interface and API to browse and access the data.

The work I have done so far revolves around storing translated lint checker descriptions as well as package synopsis and descriptions in the Guix Data Service PostgreSQL database and making them available through the Guix Data Service web interface.

Initially the Guix Data Service database had translated versions of lint warning messages available, but they were not accessible through the web interface, so I made that possible during the contribution period.

[...]

These first 7 weeks of my internship have gone by really fast, but I have enjoyed everything and I am so eager to experience what's to come.

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