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today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
Microsoft
Ubuntu
HowTos
  • Mark Shuttleworth and the secrecy of Ubuntu
  • Video Editor ‘Lightworks’ Linux Release Limited to Select Few
  • Osmos Arcade Game Added to Steam for Linux Database
  • Ext4 bug - No need to panic
  • Geeky Halloween Pics
  • Precise Puppy - Linux Perfected
  • How to become an rsync power user with Grsync
  • Ubuntu Plans To Stick To "Stable GNOME"
  • Booting into Linux on Windows 8 Secure Boot-equipped hardware
  • Ethiopian kids hack OLPCs in 5 months with zero instruction
  • An overview of our Secure Boot implementation
  • Getting started with UEFI development
  • The Ripple Effect of Windows 8
  • Howto GNOME 3 in Ubuntu
  • Widgets Are Coming To The Unity Desktop
  • BackBox Linux 3 Review
  • linux kernel monkey: Help Wanted
  • Make a game on Raspberry Pi
  • GCC 4.8 Compiler On AMD's Eight-Core Piledriver

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • What shiny new devices can Linux nerds get excited about?
  • LibreOffice coding at Red Hat
  • World’s smallest 4 megapixel camera and Tux
  • Secure Your Linux Box | LAS | s24e03
  • Glxgears proves Nvidia drivers make a big difference in Linux Mint
  • The new Juju GUI: because a picture paints a thousand words
  • A Linux Person’s Windows 8 Upgrade and Inadvertent Install Experience
  • It’s time to Wakeup!
  • rekonq: October news
  • Turn Raspberry Pi into an Email Archiver
  • 12.04 Music Player Faceoff – Clementine vs Amarok
  • Mozilla Firefox 16.0.2 Locks Down on Location Security
  • Linux Outlaws 281 – Cheri, Cheri Lady

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • The Most Interesting Features Of The Linux 3.7 Kernel
  • Xubuntu 12.10 Review
  • Moniz is born
  • Linux Games: Return To Castle Wolfenstein Coop
  • Red Hat CEO Says Firm On Track Despite Q2 Miss
  • New Linux Benchmarks For Stressing Tux
  • Bring Weather Reports to Your Desktop with Stormcloud
  • LG Electronics becomes Linaro member
  • Overclocking Your Raspberry Pi
  • Does OpenOffice have a future?
  • Security Feature in Fedora 18 Part 8
  • TuxRadar: Podcast Season 4 Episode 20

some more leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Pear Linux 6 review
  • Lenovo ThinkPad E530: The Ideal Ubuntu Laptop? [Review]
  • Raspberry Pi WebIDE
  • Announcing Every Detail Matters, Round 2
  • Cubieboard Sets Sights On Raspberry Pi With Indiegogo
  • How to tweak autologin in Ubuntu and Mint
  • Pluck Out a Novel with Plume
  • Five new RPG games for Linux
  • How to Recover From The “File Not Found" Grub Error
  • 'Steam for Linux' Community Group Launched
  • A Proposal To Fix The Full-Screen Linux Window Mess
  • Full Circle Magazine issue 66 is out
  • Edubuntu, Canonical and the Education Channel
  • Mark Shuttleworth's big mistake
  • Talk Of "EXT5" File-System; Should EXT4 Be Frozen?
  • FLOSS Weekly 230

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Blizzard Offers To Help Zynga Employees While Taking Money From Linux Users
  • Green Island: A New Qt-Based Wayland Compositor
  • Shenzhen Stock Exchange to Switch to Red Hat
  • systemd for Developers III
  • systemd for Administrators, Part XVIII
  • Throwing Money at Shiny and Worthless Technology
  • Linux needs a second look - (Ubuntu) review
  • Welcome Windows 8 to a Post-Desktop World

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Latest release of systemd includes time-based log rotation
  • ROSA Desktop 2012 Getting Closer
  • Firefox Patches Have Same Lifespan as a Mosquito
  • Limit Bandwitdth Used by apt-get
  • Fedora’s Myriad information channels (part 1), (part 2), (part 3)
  • FOSS' Fight Against China's Free-as-in-Pirated Syndrome
  • Freedom to Innovate – Interaction Design for Plasma Active
  • 7 Amazing Custom Gnome 3 Desktops!
  • Looking For The Next $1 Billion Open Source Company
  • Wayland 1.0 Officially Released
  • Perfect Linux Server | LAS | s24e02
  • When I realized why open source rocks
  • Linux Outlaws 280 – Rusty Ringpiece
  • Team Fortress 2 poised for Linux support, beta update suggests

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Cinnamon and MATE are the future
  • Asia govts welcome OSS benefits
  • Dungeon Crawl Stone Soup 0.11
  • Nvidia Wants to Remove Some GPL From Linux Kernel Code
  • TORCS 1.3.4 Racing Simulator Has Improved Tracks
  • Partner Gives Microsoft Assist in Windows 8 'Secure Boot' Controversy
  • ‘No thanks. I got Linux’
  • Linux Days 2012 Day One
  • Mono 3.0 is out
  • Wayland Continues To Excite Linux Users
  • With Wayland 1.0, A Large TODO List Remains
  • Linux Tablet Lets You Tailor It to Your Needs
  • id Software Has No Plans For Doom 3 BFG On Linux
  • LG Scares Elevator Passengers With IPS Monitors
  • The implications of LightWorks coming to Linux

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • This Week in Linux: Fedora, Mandriva, and Mageia
  • SysAdmin Corner: 7 Network Security F-Ups Small Offices Make
  • Mozilla Crosses 800,000 Filed Bugs
  • Custom grids with GIMP
  • My Firefox Setup
  • Install Mplayer and Multimedia Codecs in Ubuntu 12.10
  • LinuxDays, Gentoo, SUSE Prague Is This Weekend
  • Btrfs File-System Tuning On Linux 3.7
  • A little bit of history
  • Would You Buy This Ubuntu-Branded Smartphone Speaker?
  • Ubuntu 12.10: what is new and how to test it
  • First thing to do after installing Ubuntu 12.10, protect your privacy!

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • The Pioneers of UNIX
  • LibreOffice 3.5.7 Released
  • Apache OpenOffice now a top-level project - So What?
  • A few links you might find interesting
  • Kaspersky Lab announces a new OS focused on security
  • Gentoo Linux Miniconf Gentoo on the OLPC XO1.75
  • Achieving Photorealism in Blender
  • Whose cloud is the open-sourciest... Who cares?
  • New Features Coming Up For The GCC 4.8 Compiler
  • New Version of Calibre Brings a Slew of Improvements
  • NVIDIA 304.60 Driver Fixes Bugs
  • Going Linux Oct 17 #187
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 475

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Fedora 19 Might Replace Rsyslogd With Journald
  • Slax 7.0 Getting Closer
  • The KDE PIM meeting, just awesome!
  • Lightworks for Linux: The developer's story
  • Sourceforge October 2012 Developer Newsletter
  • Red Hat Developer Day
  • Fedora 19 Continues With Unique Names
  • Disabling Secure Boot signature validation
  • Linux df Command Usage Examples
  • FLOSS Weekly 229
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More in Tux Machines

KDE Leftovers

  • Integrate Your Android Device With Ubuntu Using KDE Connect Indicator Fork
    KDE Connect is a tool which allows your Android device to integrate with your Linux desktop. With KDE Connect Indicator, you can use KDE Connect on desktop that support AppIndicators, like Unity, Xfce (Xubuntu), and so on.
  • FirstAid – PDF Help Viewer
    in the recent months, I didn’t find much time to spend on Kate/KTextEditor development. But at least I was now able to spend a bit more time on OpenSource & Qt things even during work time in our company. Normally I am stuck there with low level binary or source analysis work. [...] Therefore, as our GUIs are developed with Qt anyways, we did take a look at libpoppler (and its Qt 5 bindings), which is the base of Okular, too.
  • KBibTeX 0.6.1-rc2 released
    After quite some delay, I finally assembled a second release candidate for KBibTeX 0.6.1. Version 0.6.1 will be the last release in the 0.6.x series.
  • Meet KDE at FOSDEM Next Month
    Next month is FOSDEM, the largest gathering of free software developers anywhere in Europe. FOSDEM 2017 is being held at the ULB Campus Solbosch on Saturday 4th and Sunday 5th of February. Thousands of coders, designers, maintainers and managers from projects as popular as Linux and as obscure as Tcl/Tk will descend on the European capital Brussels to talk, present, show off and drink beer.

Leftovers: OSS

  • D-Wave Unveils Open-Source Software for Quantum Computing
    Canada-based D-Wave Systems has released an open-source software tool designed to help developers program quantum computers, Wired reported Wednesday.
  • D-Wave builds open quantum computing software development ecosystem
    D-Wave Systems has released an open source quantum computing chunk of software. Quantum computing, as we know, moves us on from the world of mere 1’s and 0’s in binary to the new level of ‘superposition’ qubits that can represent many more values and therefore more computing power — read this accessible piece for a simple explanation of quantum computing.
  • FOSS Compositing With Natron
    Anyone who likes to work with graphics will at one time or another find compositing software useful. Luckily, FOSS has several of the best in Blender and Natron.
  • Hadoop Creator Doug Cutting: 5 Ways to Be Successful with Open Source in 2017
    Because of my long-standing association with the Apache Software Foundation, I’m often asked the question, “What’s next for open source technology?” My typical response is variations of “I don’t know” to “the possibilities are endless.” Over the past year, we’ve seen open source technology make strong inroads into the mainstream of enterprise technology. Who would have thought that my work on Hadoop ten years ago would impact so many industries – from manufacturing to telecom to finance. They have all taken hold of the powers of the open source ecosystem not only to improve the customer experience, become more innovative and grow the bottom line, but also to support work toward the greater good of society through genomic research, precision medicine and programs to stop human trafficking, as just a few examples. Below I’ve listed five tips for folks who are curious about how to begin working with open source and what to expect from the ever-changing ecosystem.
  • Radio Free HPC Looks at New Open Source Software for Quantum Computing
    In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team looks at D-Wave’s new open source software for quantum computing. The software is available on github along with a whitepaper written by Cray Research alums Mike Booth and Steve Reinhardt.
  • Why events matter and how to do them right
    Marina Paych was a newcomer to open source software when she left a non-governmental organization for a new start in the IT sector—on her birthday, no less. But the real surprise turned out to be open source. Fast forward two years and this head of organizational development runs an entire department, complete with a promotional staff that strategically markets her employer's open source web development services on a worldwide scale.
  • Exploring OpenStack's Trove DBaaS Cloud Servic
    You can install databases such as MySQL, PostgreSQL, or even MongoDB very quickly thanks to package management, but the installation is not even half the battle. A functioning database also needs user accounts and several configuration steps for better performance and security. This need for additional configuration poses challenges in cloud environments. You can always manually install a virtual machine in traditional settings, but cloud users want to generate an entire virtual environment from a template. Manual intervention is difficult or sometimes even impossible.
  • Mobile Edge Computing Creates ‘Tiny Data Centers’ at the Edge
    “Usually access networks include all kinds of encryption and tunneling protocols,” says Fite. “It’s not a standard, native-IP environment.” Saguna’s platform creates a bridge between the access network to a small OpenStack cloud, which works in a standard IP environment. It provides APIs about such things as location, registration for services, traffic direction, radio network services, and available bandwidth.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • Debian Creeps Closer To The Next Release
    I’ve been alarmed by the slow progress of Debian towards the next release. They’ve had several weird gyrations in numbers of “release-critical” bugs and still many packages fail to build from source. Last time this stage, they had only a few hundred bugs to go. Now they are over 600. I guess some of that comes from increasing the number of included packages. There are bound to be more bad interactions, like changing the C compiler. I hate that language which seems to be a moving target… Systemd seems to be smoother but it still gives me problems.
  • Mir: 2016 end of year review
    2016 was a good year for Mir – it is being used in more places, it has more and better upstream support and it is easier to use by downstream projects. 2017 will be even better and will see version 1.0 released.
  • Ubuntu Still Planning For Mir 1.0 In 2017
    Alan Griffiths of Canonical today posted a year-in-review for Mir during 2016 and a look ahead to this year.
  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” KDE – BETA Release

GNU Gimp Development

  • Community-supported development of GEGL now live
    Almost every new major feature people have been asking us for, be it high bit depth support, or full CMYK support, or layer effects, would be impossible without having a robust, capable image processing core. Øyvind Kolås picked up GEGL in mid-2000s and has been working on it in his spare time ever since. He is the author of 42% of commits in GEGL and 50% of commits in babl (pixel data conversion library).
  • 2016 in review
    When we released GIMP 2.9.2 in late 2015 and stepped over into 2016, we already knew that we’d be doing mostly polishing. This turned out to be true to a larger extent, and most of the work we did was under-the-hood changes. But quite a few new features slipped in. So, what are the big user-visible changes for GIMP in 2016?