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News

some leftovers:

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News
  • Ranking Linux distributions, and the decline of the traditional distros
  • New Security Feature in Fedora 19 Part 3: Hard Link/Soft Link Protection
  • Open-source office suite written in Java
  • Updated history of the 2.6.16-stable kernel
  • Pidora 18 (Raspberry Pi Fedora Remix) Release
  • From subversive to mainstream: Looking back on 18 years
  • Rktcr coming soon to Linux, demo out now!
  • BSD Magazine (May 2013): Jails Firewall with PF
  • SELinux policy for incron: what does it do?
  • The Luminosity of Free Software, Episode 13
  • Microsoft releases Skype for Linux 4.2
  • Synaptic update error in Debian Jessie
  • Designing Electronics with Linux
  • FLOSS Weekly 252
  • Raspberry Pi Gets New Wayland Weston Renderer
  • Megabyte punch from Electro Games Will be on Linux also
  • vnstat: Network logging over time
  • The Cheapskate's Corner
  • Debian GNU/Hurd 2013 released
  • Debian Project mourns the loss of Ray Dassen

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
HowTos
  • rekonq, working on extension support
  • Two Useful Apps to View CPU Info in Linux
  • CrunchBang 11 Waldorf
  • Dynamic DNS—an Object Lesson in Problem Solving
  • mrzoom: Not really for the underpowered
  • Maintain A Local Repo
  • Customizing Unity
  • Top Ten Sleeper Distros
  • 7 Linux Date Command Examples
  • Linux System Programming, 2ed
  • ZevenOS-Neptune 3.1 Efficiently Combines KDE and Debian 7.0
  • Unlicensed code: Movement or Madness?
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 317
  • Another week of rawhide (2013-05-21 edition)
  • Free and open source support for RAR archives in Fedora
  • Accessing the Raspberry Pi’s 1MHz timer
  • Steganography- Hide Your Files Inside An Image In Linux
  • Blender 2.67a Released
  • GNU Hackers Meeting 2013
  • Samsung Talks About Its Aggressive Linux Talent Recruitment Strategy
  • Linux gamers trying to convince Blizzard, EA and Co.
  • Okular welcomes configurable review tools
  • Behold: A Newer, Better Firefox
  • Linux and Google Chrome get cozy with Kernel 2.9

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Mageia 3: Here's what I gained and what I lost
  • kmail2 still not suitable for on-the-road use :(
  • New 32-way Raspberry Pi cluster built by US PhD candidate
  • Evolus Pencil: A Great Microsoft Visio Alternative For Linux
  • Ubuntu: Restoring the Community Link
  • hnb: Quick, clever and clean
  • Linux Games: Haunt
  • How to Keep SSH Connections Alive In Linux
  • Bacon: Respect in Community Discussion and Debate
  • Icculus on Oculus Rift
  • Is The Canadian Government Rolling Out GNU/Linux Clients?
  • HOT Raspberry Pi DIY Mini Desktop PC Build
  • Uninstall Windows or Linux After Dual-Booting
  • 5 Linux Features You Want in Your Company
  • Status Line in Vim
  • Finally! Lightworks Runs On Debian GNU/Linux
  • Microsoft Office Clone Updates Interface, Improves File Support
  • BSDTalk interview with Kris Moore (PC-BSD)
  • Removing unwanted applications in Debian
  • Making Linux and Android Get Along
  • The secret to great reporting with Drupal 7

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • KWin running in Weston
  • Is Google abusing its power?
  • Unix/Linux File Recognition. Did You Know?
  • Get better desktop performance with pf-kernel
  • How to transform a Debian based system to a Debian Edu installation
  • Flareget a great download manager for Linux
  • Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 review - A surprise
  • Bash Functions for more a powerful Alias
  • OpenPandora review, part two
  • Btrfs vs. EXT4 vs. XFS vs. F2FS On Linux 3.10
  • Linux, Standards and the Enterprise: Why Red Hat is Best
  • Add Alacarte Menu Editor to Fedora 18 Xfce
  • Linux Basement - Episode 79 - Great Googly Moogly

few odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • openSUSE 13.1 Off to the Races
  • Watch and record live TV on your Raspberry Pi
  • Can gaming be the turning point for Linux on the desktop?
  • Red Hat CEO Whitehurst on innovation, OpenStack, Hadoop
  • Infotainment is the First Target for Open Source in Cars
  • 10 Tech Terms Even Non-Geeks Should Know
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 505

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Not all laptops are designed equal
  • OpenSUSE Considers Replacing LXDE With E17
  • XO Tablet Supposedly Becomes Available on June 1
  • Migrate From MySQL To MariaDB In FreeBSD
  • Can't update Iceweasel from Experimental on Wheezy
  • TuxRadar: Podcast Season 5 Episode 8

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • 100% Linux is Impractical
  • Overriding the default SELinux policies
  • SlateBook x2: Tegra 4-powered Android hybrid
  • Debian Users Update Flash
  • Drupal Is a Framework
  • Measuring Linux By the VAR Metric
  • EasyUbuntu Equivalent For Fedora: EasyLife
  • using grep with more than one expression
  • A complete computer smaller than a grain of sand
  • Linux vs Windows 2013: An Objective Comparison (video)
  • Introduction To The Linux Command Line
  • Mixxx sees new release
  • FOSS Knowledge, Part 3: Reaching the goal
  • Configuring Gmail as a Sendmail email relay
  • How to install Linux on a vintage 68K Mac
  • Anomaly 2 Released
  • X3: Albion Prelude Released For Linux Gamers

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Is Mozilla Firefox 21 A 'Healthy' Browser?
  • Second alpha release of Debian Edu / Skolelinux Wheezy
  • How to navigate in Vim
  • Why I’m not writing off Nvidia’s Shield
  • How to install skype on debian 64-bit
  • Install Ubuntu on a Chromebook Pixel
  • Antergos Erases Cinnarch with Inaugural Release
  • XBMC used for in hotel system
  • GNOME Control Center 3.8.2 Released with Minor Improvements
  • Rawhide week of fun, 2013-05-14
  • SUSE Helps Italian Catering Group Cut Costs
  • Linux commands: Newusers adds new users
  • The Ultimate Fedora Code Name Generator
  • Unix Architecture Showing it's Age

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Top 10 Computer Tricks Every Geek Should Know
  • News in kdepim 4.11: Header theme (1/3)
  • Portable Package Formats
  • Cinnarch successor Antergos arrives
  • Steam on Linux: everything you need to know
  • a golden wallpaper
  • Martin Gräßlin: Mir in Kubuntu, Jonathan Riddell: On Same
  • Toward a more colorful LibreOffice
  • Linux Command Line Alternatives
  • SimplyMEPIS 12 Reaches Beta Quality
  • Canonical Vows to Maintain Community Focus
  • Some Weather and System Conky Configs
  • Indirect Dependencies Are Killing Open Source Licenses
  • Review: Hairy Tales has been released for Linux
  • aspell: A spellchecker at the console
  • ROSA Desktop Fresh LXDE alpha preview
  • Open Data, Creative Destruction and Money
  • Building for your version of openSUSE in 5 simple steps!
  • Mozilla: Personalization with Respect
  • A Windows Developer’s Brutal Explanation As To Why Microsoft Is Falling Behind
  • Book Review: Raspberry Pi in Easy Steps
  • Fixing high CPU usage in Linux Mint 13 on ThinkPads
  • Home, My Backup Data Center
  • Linux Outlaws 310 – Glusterfuck

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • KDE Manifesto: On The Doorstep
  • Which Linux Distribution would you save? The Results
  • The heroes of Fedora updates testing in Q1 2013
  • Half-Life 2 has been released for Linux
  • Protect Yourself Online With Tor, TAILS, and Debian
  • Gaming with Linux: Growing the game and app market
  • cgroups: A BIG WIN for Systemd
  • Finnix 108 Distro Fixes CD Tray Ejection Bug
  • Mount Android 4.0 with gvfs on Ubuntu
  • Results of Apache OpenOffice 4.0 Logo Survey
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More in Tux Machines

GNOME 3.25.3 Released, GTK Development

  • GNOME 3.25.3 Now Available
    GNOME 3.25.3 is now available as the latest stepping stone towards September's release of GNOME 3.26.
  • GNOME 3.26 Desktop Environment Development Continues, New Milestone Is Out Now
    Matthias Clasen has informed the community via an email announcement that the third milestone of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment is now ready for public testing. After a one day delay, GNOME 3.25.3 is now available, and it's the third development release of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment that could be used by default in popular GNU/Linux distributions, such as the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) or Fedora 27, both due for release later this year. It brings a bunch of updates and new features to several of its components and apps.
  • Eight years since first release and still no usable theme?
    Well, let me be frank. Ever since gtk-3.0 I've been skeptical of it, especially of the theming aspect. In gtk-2 we had (and still have) many themes ranging from trash to excellent, almost every kind of taste could have been satisfied. Not so in gtk-3. First issue is constant changes to theming API, meaning that despite there being hundreds of themes, only handful of them actually work right :( And among them, I still have yet to find one that would work on my fairly usual 15,6″ laptop screen with 1366×768 px resolution. Basicaly I have two issues.

Microsoft Dirty Tricks and Entryism

Security: Windows Causes Chaos, Routers With Back Doors, Patching of UNIX/Linux

  • Traffic lights in Australia hit by WannaCry ransomware [Ed: Well, who uses Microsoft Windows to manage traffic?!?!]

    Radio station 3aw reports that dozens of pole based traffic calming measures are infected and that this came as a surprise to the local minister and Road Safety Camera Commissioner when radio reporters told him about it.

  • Honda shuts down factory after finding NSA-derived Wcry in its networks
    The WCry ransomware worm has struck again, this time prompting Honda Company to halt production in one of its Japan-based factories after finding infections in a broad swath of its computer networks, according to media reports. The automaker shut down its Sayama plant northwest of Tokyo on Monday after finding that WCry had affected networks across Japan, North America, Europe, China, and other regions, Reuters reported Wednesday. Discovery of the infection came on Sunday, more than five weeks after the onset of the NSA-derived ransomware worm, which struck an estimated 727,000 computers in 90 countries. The mass outbreak was quickly contained through a major stroke of good luck. A security researcher largely acting out of curiosity registered a mysterious domain name contained in the WCry code that acted as a global kill switch that immediately halted the self-replicating attack.
  • GhostHook: CyberArk finds new way to attack Windows 10

    Researchers at CyberArk Labs have discovered a new way of gaining access to the innards of Windows 10 64-bit systems that can bypass existing safeguards, including the kernel patch protection known as PatchGuard that Microsoft developed to improve system security.

  • John McAfee claims 'every router in America has been compromised' by hackers and spies

    Technology pioneer John McAfee believes that every home internet router in America is wide open to cyberattacks by criminal hackers and intelligence agencies. He makes the claim speaking after revelations from WikiLeaks that the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) targets the devices.

  • 'Stack Clash' Smashed Security Fix in Linux
    What's old is new again: an exploit protection mechanism for a known flaw in the Linux kernel has fallen to a new attack targeting an old problem.
  • Continuous defence against open source exploits
    Register for next month's expo for the public sector DevOps community to hear key speakers from the front line of public sector digital transformation and see the latest technologies at first hand. Andrew Martin, DevOps lead in a major government department, has been added to the line-up of speakers to talk about the importance of getting the approach to security right with open source software.
  • IoT goes nuclear: creating a ZigBee chain reaction [iophk: "use 6lowpan instead"]

    If plugging in an infected bulb is too much hassle, the authors also demonstrate how to take over bulbs by war-driving around in a car, or by war-flying a drone.

  • Passengers given a freight as IT glitch knocks out rail ticket machines

    The network of machines are operated by the individual franchises, but share a common infrastructure from German software company Scheidt and Bachmann.

OpenBSD Development News

  • OpenBSD now has Trapsleds to make life harder for ROPers
  • Historical: My first OpenBSD Hackathon

    I was a nobody. With some encouragement, enough liquid courage to override my imposter syndrome, and a few hours of mentoring, I'm now doing big projects. The next time you're sitting at a table with someone new to your field, ask yourself: how can you encourage them? You just might make the world better.

    Thank you Dale. And thank you Theo.

  • Finish the link-kit job
    We've had the linkkit components in the tree for a while, but it has taken nearly 20 rounds between rpe/tb/myself to get the last few bits finished. So that the link kit is cleanly used at reboot, but also fits in with the practices kernel developers follow.