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today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • ssh is terrifically easy

  • Asus 1008HA with Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala Alpha2
  • about:mozilla 7/21
  • Pardus 2009
  • Open Source Watershed
  • Wallpaper a Day - Day 7
  • Wallpaper a Day - Day 8
  • Samsung NC20 - A Brief Encounter
  • Firefox 3.5 vs. Chrome 3 Showdown, Round 4: Running Web apps
  • Open source mainframe software: Two perspectives
  • Open-source firmware vuln exposes wireless routers
  • Launchpad is now open source
  • Task
  • Akademy 2009 Technical Papers Published
  • OpenOffice Renaissance prototyping phase drawing to close
  • Should we all switch to BSD?
  • The Software Freedom Law Show - Episode 0x12: OSCON

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • John Carmack on Linux ports

  • Bitter Foes Microsoft and Linux Unite Against Software Rules
  • Frictional Sale Successful
  • A spot of roughness with VirtualBox 3.02 on Ubuntu
  • Automounting in KDE4
  • The exciting topic of footnotes and endnotes in OOo
  • What's OLPC Biggest Mistake? Negroponte Says Sugar
  • Ubuntu Server Edition: Where’s the Official Support?
  • Mozilla awards best new Tab ideas
  • Adventures With Ubuntu
  • Common Keyring: KDE and GNOME Combine Password Management Efforts
  • TreemapViewer: Building Silverlight Applications on Unix
  • Introducing Libstorage
  • Linux exploit gets around security barrier

few more odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • Ardentryst, RPG Game for all ages

  • Clutter Takes A Step Closer To 1.0 Release
  • Sequences with seq
  • Spitting in the wind – Mono 180?
  • Utility of a Web only OS
  • Mac vs. Ubuntu: The Winner is…
  • Ubuntu upgrade gripe

odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • It's Time for an International Linux Summit

  • KRudd to have PM TV on new open source website
  • FLOSS Weekly 78: BZFlag
  • The Reason Why I Loved Knoppix More Than Windows
  • KDE Wallpaper a Day - Day 9
  • Unusual Behavior of Firefox 3.5.1 When Handling Javascripts
  • thirty million downloads of firefox 3.5
  • Networking Vista and Ubuntu
  • Gimp Tip : Isolate image from background
  • HowTo: Regular cleanup the Tempfolders
  • How-To: Compile and Install Audacious 2.1 in Ubuntu 9.04
  • Solang hits Fedora
  • Customize your replies with Claws Mail Templates
  • Pidgin on Debian: Yahoo Issue and Facebook
  • Blackberry Storm Tethering Ubuntu 9.04 and Dell Studio XPS

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • New vulnerability discovered for Firefox 3.5.1

  • How to easily configure Mandriva Software Manager to use wget
  • KDE Wallpaper a Day - Day 10
  • Internet kills off Teletext news and information service
  • New brushes for your GIMP
  • Creating a Package for Debian
  • logcheck: brilliantly simple log monitoring
  • Cubuntu - Command Line Ubuntu Part One
  • Review: Firefox 3.5 Makes Browsing Better
  • Is Google's Chrome OS a Threat to Free Software?

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • 5 Awesome Mozilla Labs Projects for Firefox 3.5

  • 10 Concerns We Have About Google Chrome OS
  • Banshee and F-Spot to depend on Moonlight
  • Red Hat added to S&P 500
  • The good and the bad of netbooks
  • EasyIngres Seeks To Attract MySQL Developers
  • Microsoft Patent Aggression Continues against Free Software
  • Opera 10 Beta 2: A Solution For Older Computers
  • openSuse Network Manager vs Wicd
  • Migrating to Linux, Part 1: Sharing a Room With Windows
  • Promises Plated in Chrome
  • Ultimate Mobile OS Showdown:
  • Linux Camping: Day 2 - Starting a fire and burning things
  • The Intellectual Property Rights Imperative of Single-Vendor Open Source

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • PlayonLinux: Surprisingly Compatible

  • OpenOffice bug/feature stirs 'horde of angry chimps'
  • Don’t confuse Microsoft’s IP with Linux
  • Microsoft's Empty Promise
  • Red Hat Shares Fall Flat
  • Linux Against Poverty Installfest - August 1st
  • Opera 10 Beta 2+ Released
  • Kerberos fun
  • The Business Of Free
  • Omnipresent Search Interface GNOME Deskba
  • Linux Crazy Podcast 59 Robert Raitz (pappy_mcfae)
  • Linux Format wallpapers Updated
  • How to Choose the Best Web Browser
  • Migrating From WUBI to Full Ubuntu Install
  • Does Printing Work Well In Linux?
  • eBox Releases Version 1.2
  • Ubuntu Netbook Remix on AA1
  • Draco loves KDE3
  • On natural selection, evolution, and open source licenses
  • Google Chrome OS: I don't think so

some more odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Linux, Mac users - your copy of Windows may be tax deductible

  • Australian Linux users finally have tax return satisfaction
  • Firefox 3.5.1 due this week to fix security and slow startup bugs
  • Install Firefox 3.5 in Ubuntu 9.04 using Ubuntuzilla
  • mozilla foundation is 6 years old today
  • A Chromium RPM on Fedora 11
  • Linux Camping: Day 1 - Setting up the tent
  • Users have to wise up to cloud security
  • Wallpaper Tray - Customize Your Linux Wallpaper Automatically
  • Another Reason I Don’t Like Apple
  • That FUDCon poster is catching on
  • Adding PPAs Easily
  • The truth about the Mono logo

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Killing Processes by Name on Linux or Unix Systems

  • Using The Host Object in Firewall Builder
  • Setting up a FTP Server on debian
  • FFmpeg made easy
  • How to Display Twitter Statuses/Updates on Conky
  • Ubuntu System Admin Class: Command Line Basics

  • Say NO! To Ubuntu satanic edition

  • Not only the Ubunteros…
  • Opinion: On the Future of Data Storage and RAID Technologies
  • Ubuntu and sound input
  • Linux Outlaws 102 - Goo/Linux
  • Ubuntu Technical Board: Nominations
  • Open source and cloud computing - a match made in heaven?
  • FOSDEM X: 6+7 Feb 2010
  • Empathy is now in Karmic
  • Emmys using Drupal
  • (K)Ubuntu So Far…
  • Das Keyboard Now has Linux Keycaps Available
  • The grand Google plan against the whole Microsoft stack
  • Life with Linux: More apps
  • GNOME's Zeitgeist Engine Has Its First Release
  • Cloud Interoperability: Haven't We Danced Before?

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Penumbra Collection $5 Weekend Sale!

  • Mono: Why is Debian resorting to spin?
  • Open-source extremism, and how the OSI can help
  • hardware4linux is back online
  • Reputation key to success in an open source world
  • Chrome OS, Android, and Other Trends Boost Open Source Jobs
  • Red Hat's Open Source Cloud Forum--Free Online, Top Speakers
  • Career advice: Preparing for life after the recession
  • Evolving Partner Programs: Microsoft vs. Red Hat
  • Microsoft's Azure cloud price pipped by Amazon's Linux
  • Vibrant Community Propels KDE Forward at Akademy 2009
  • Recession-Proof Open Source
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