Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

News

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Myth Busted #1: Ubuntu Hackers are Canonical Employees
  • Microsoft's dropped feature is Linux's gain
  • The automake and libtool clash
  • I joined the (KDE) game ...and you can, too!
  • Working for Microsoft
  • Red Hat to Webcast Results for Third Quarter Fiscal Year 2011
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Handles Workloads Physical and Virtual
  • Compiz vs Ubuntu Classic Desktop
  • Fedora: A Bug Report I Filed Today
  • Third openSUSE Board Election 2010
  • running for the opensuse board
  • NVIDIA Quietly Uploads New Linux Driver
  • Linux fast-boot technology touted for four-second Atom boot
  • Mandriva Thanks Users' Groups
  • VLC With Phonon Back-End Is Now Ready For Use
  • Livin' La Vida Canonical Ain't Easy
  • Masco And Red Hat Jumped The Most In The S&P 500
  • Oracle claims trademark on Hudson open source

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Linux 2.6.37-rc4 Kernel Released On Schedule
  • Linus on branching...
  • Three Awesome GTK Themes to Use With Faenza Icons
  • Garmin using Drupal
  • Crowdsource Is Not Open Source
  • Leveraging Linux for Supercomputing
  • MySQL vs. PostgreSQL, Part 1: Table Organization
  • AskUbuntu firefox Add-on
  • Norwegian Regions and Municipalities Have Gone Open Source
  • 4 Great Places To Find Free Beautiful Photo Wallpapers
  • ‘Ubuntu Light’ available to download from Dell
  • Kwin + desktop switching – the solution
  • Panasonic Jungle "doing something very different"
  • Age of Conquest III 3.0.4669
  • The Emacs 30 Day Challenge
  • Get juiced with Pulp
  • 5 Operating Systems Making News This Week
  • Irvin Kershner, 'Empire Strikes Back' director, dies at 87
  • Linux Basement - Episode 64 - Fine Corinthian Bieber Groupies

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • New: OpenOffice.org 3.3.0 Release Candidate 7
  • Indie side-scrolling shooter BEEP hitting Ubuntu shores soon
  • An Environment to Test Linux and OpenOffice? What about an Academic Dissertation?
  • A New Clutter Development Release
  • Faenza Cairo-Clock theme
  • Tycoon Games Super Bundle
  • Oracle erects mystery Sparc SuperCluster
  • LXC: Ubuntu Working to Improve Containers
  • Red Hat Closing In To Resistance
  • Ubuntu 11.04: Network Manager Finally Gets AppIndicator Support
  • Dr.Saleem Khan needs prayers

today's odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • Compiz in November 27 daily build of Ubuntu 11.04
  • Cassidy: As valley changes, so do startups
  • Gnome Activity Journal’s "mystery" hacker continues
  • 9 Videos from the 2010 Blender Conference
  • Introducing Module-Format
  • Google Insights and Tweets for CentOS 6
  • VideoLan Movie Creator (VLMC) Gets Video Effects
  • Linux Radio
  • Symbian Sputters Towards Open-Source Irrelevancy
  • Linux Outlaws 178 - I Want It Dead!

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Muine - A simple playlist based Audio player
  • KDEMU with Nuno Pinheiro
  • Banshee UI changes
  • Cardapio gets mini-mode & Docky helper
  • Natty Update Finally Sets Unity Default (For Desktop) [Video]
  • Was This The Original Intent Of Homeland Security?
  • Wayland Now Has A Nested Compositor Back-End
  • Lightspark 0.4.5 With New Graphics Engine Nears
  • M.A.R.S. - A Ridiculous Shooter
  • Subdownloader - A subtitle downloader for Linux

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • RHEL 6.0 Server Evaluation - thoughts and screenshots
  • “Seasons after Fall” created in Blender slated for 2011 release
  • New Rubrique in the openSUSE Weekly News
  • Natty Narwhal Alpha 1 Coming December 2
  • University of Warwick to spend £1.3m on Linux supercomputer
  • Amarok and my Stats Fail
  • M$ Needs GNU/Linux
  • Red Hat Breaking Out?
  • Demo Of Wayland Display Server In Ubuntu
  • Atom Zombie Smasher coming to Linux
  • Tanberg rips off an open source project
  • The kde-www war: part 1
  • Gnome Activity Journal becomes Draggable
  • PeaZip 3.5 is released

today's odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • ADeskBar – A lightweight and gorgeous GNOME panel replacement
  • Is Ubuntu Unknowingly Introducing FUD?
  • Things for which I'm Grateful
  • The best netbook distro of 2010
  • Q&A with Larry Augustin, SugarCRM CEO
  • HP Deskjet 3050 j610 on Debian Squeeze
  • Variety On The Desktop
  • The automated testing of Ubuntu SRUs
  • Open Source Monitoring, Icinga vs Nagios
  • People behind Debian: Colin Watson
  • Impressive 3d slide transations for OpenOffice presentations
  • It's Becoming Very Easy To Run Wayland
  • TrueHD, DTS-HD, E-AC3 Over HDMI On Linux
  • 5 of the Best Free and Open Source Data Mining Software
  • TuxRadar Podcast Season 2 Episode 22

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Shuttleworth's Ubuntu makes like Space Shuttle
  • FreetuxTV – Web TV and Radio player
  • Viewsonic and the GPL
  • Hands-on: Opera 11 tab stacking vs Firefox Panorama
  • A replacement for X finally!
  • French social security now run on PostgreSQL and Red Hat Linux
  • Fuduntu 14.5 - Subtle improvements
  • Introduction to the Blender Fluid Simulator
  • Control Points and Steering Mechanisms in Open Source Software Projects
  • Norway: All regions and nearly all municipalities now use open source
  • PL: Poznań city's e-Government platform built on open source components
  • Ubuntu One — good or bad?
  • Nero Linux 4 - Never Knew Nero had a Linux Version
  • Meet the GIMP: Episode 151: #150 reloaded!
  • Watch for Shares of Red Hat to Approach Resistance at $43.87
  • 7like GNoMenu theme: Ambiance meets windows
  • Xen Dom0 Support May Come Back To Fedora
  • Last Day at Mozilla
  • KDE Commit-Digest for 24th October
  • FLOSS Weekly 143: Ganymede

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Enlightenment... Now Running On Refrigerators
  • PiTiVi Startup Assistant
  • CrossOver Linux Review
  • OverView Zoomy presentations with OpenGL
  • Nvidia upgrades toolkit for GPU programming
  • 100 Websites To See Before You Die (Part 1)
  • Rage developer interview: John Carmack
  • Calendar Systems in KDE 4.6
  • Open source feats to be proud of
  • Intel Windows vs. Linux GPU Performance Q4'2010
  • OpenOffice.org 3.3.0 Release Candidate 6
  • Opera 11 Beta Introduces Tab Stacking, Extensions
  • Free as in Freedom: Episode 0x03: i Don't Store
  • Going for gold (OLPC)
  • David Reveman lands GPU acceleration for Moonlight…
  • Lucidity theme for Linux adds pastel elegance to the desktop
  • Released: FreeNAS 8 (Beta)
  • Seigo: multihead saga continues
  • Red Hat: Cowen Says Hold; A Buyout’s Unlikely
  • ‘Ubuntu Invaders’ wallpaper is retro win
  • Implications, questions on SUSE Linux, but not the end

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • NetBSD 5.1 feature update arrives
  • Clementine music player adds Ubuntu Sound menu support
  • Bangarang – What The Dilly Yo?!
  • FI: Scientific study into migration proves value of open source
  • Why VIM is not my favorite editor
  • Open source: It’s not all or nothing
  • Bringing Up Hardware First In Linux, Then Windows
  • No KMS? No Mesa? Run Wayland Off A Linux Framebuffer!
  • Running The Native ZFS Linux Kernel Module, Plus Benchmarks
  • Fusion Garage GPL update
  • Red Hat Near The 50 Day
  • Canonical's new partnerships: A challenge in the enterprise space?
  • GNU contributor statistics for November 2010
  • Best Open Source Database: Its probably a NoSQL
  • Tiled View: New Gnome Shell Mockup
  • Planet Ubuntu Facelift
  • Burg Gives Your Multi-Boot Screen a Big Facelift
  • KDE Part of Google Code-in
  • Remote Linux Administration | LAS | s14e06
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Networking and Security

  • FAQ: What's so special about 802.11ad Wi-Fi?
    Here are the broad strokes about 802.11ad, the wireless technology that’s just starting to hit the market.
  • 2.5 and 5 Gigabit Ethernet Now Official Standards
    In 2014, multiple groups started efforts to create new mid-tier Ethernet speeds with the NBASE-T Alliance starting in October 2014 and MGBASE-T Alliance getting started a few months later in December 2014. While those groups started out on different paths, the final 802.3bz standard represents a unified protocol that is interoperable across multiple vendors. The promise of 2.5 and 5 Gbps Ethernet is that they can work over existing Cat5 cabling, which to date has only been able to support 1 Gbps. Now with the 802.3bz standard, organizations do not need to rip and replace cabling to get Ethernet that is up to five times faster. "Now, the 1000BASE-T uplink from the wireless to wired network is no longer sufficient, and users are searching for ways to tap into higher data rates without having to overhaul the 70 billion meters of Cat5e / Cat6 wiring already sold," David Chalupsky, board of directors of the Ethernet Alliance and Intel principal engineer, said in a statement. "IEEE 802.3bz is an elegant solution that not only addresses the demand for faster access to rapidly rising data volumes, but also capitalizes on previous infrastructure investments, thereby extending their life and maximizing value."
  • A quick fix for stupid password reset questions
    It didn’t take 500 million hacked Yahoo accounts to make me hate, hate, hate password reset questions (otherwise known as knowledge-based authentication or KBA). It didn't help when I heard that password reset questions and answers -- which are often identical, required, and reused on other websites -- were compromised in that massive hack, too. Is there any security person or respected security guidance that likes them? They are so last century. What is your mother’s maiden name? What is your favorite color? What was your first pet’s name?
  • French hosting provider hit by DDoS close to 1TBps
    A hosting provider in France has been hit by a distributed denial of service attack that went close to one terabyte per second. Concurrent attacks against OVH clocked in at 990GBps. The attack vector is said to be the same Internet-of-Things botnet of 152,464 devices that brought down the website of security expert Brian Krebs. OVH chief technology officer Octave Klaba tweeted that the network was capable of attacks up to 1.5TBps.
  • Latest IoT DDoS Attack Dwarfs Krebs Takedown At Nearly 1Tbps Driven By 150K Devices
    If you thought that the massive DDoS attack earlier this month on Brian Krebs’ security blog was record-breaking, take a look at what just happened to France-based hosting provider OVH. OVH was the victim of a wide-scale DDoS attack that was carried via network of over 152,000 IoT devices. According to OVH founder and CTO Octave Klaba, the DDoS attack reached nearly 1 Tbps at its peak. Of those IoT devices participating in the DDoS attack, they were primarily comprised of CCTV cameras and DVRs. Many of these types devices' network settings are improperly configured, which leaves them ripe for the picking for hackers that would love to use them to carry our destructive attacks.

Android Leftovers

  • Goodbye QWERTY: BlackBerry stops making hardware
    BlackBerry CEO John Chen has been hinting at this move for almost a year now: today BlackBerry announced it will no longer design hardware. Say goodbye to all the crazy hardware QWERTY devices, ultra-wide phones, and unique slider designs. Speaking to investors, BlackBerry CEO John Chen described the move as a "pivot to software," saying, "The company plans to end all internal hardware development and will outsource that function to partners. This allows us to reduce capital requirements and enhance return on invested capital." The "Outsourcing to partners" plan is something we've already seen with the "BlackBerry" DTEK50, which was just a rebranded Alcatel Idol 4. Chen is now betting the future of the company on software, saying, "In Q2, we more than doubled our software revenue year over year and delivered the highest gross margin in the company's history. We also completed initial shipments of BlackBerry Radar, an end-to-end asset tracking system, and signed a strategic licensing agreement to drive global growth in our BBM consumer business." BlackBerry never effectively responded to the 2007 launch of the iPhone and the resulting transition to modern touchscreen smartphones. BlackBerry took swings with devices like the BlackBerry Storm in 2008, its first touchscreen phone; and the BlackBerry Z10 in 2013, the first BlackBerry phone with an OS designed for touch, but neither caught on. BlackBerry's first viable competitor to the iPhone didn't arrive until it finally switched to Android in 2015 with the BlackBerry Priv. It was the first decent BlackBerry phone in some time, but the high price and subpar hardware led to poor sales.
  • Oracle's 'Gamechanger' Evidence Really Just Evidence Of Oracle Lawyers Failing To Read
    Then on to the main show: Oracle's claim that Google hid the plans to make Android apps work on Chrome OS. Google had revealed to Oracle its "App Runtime for Chrome" (ARC) setup, and it was discussed by Oracle's experts, but at Google I/O, Google revealed new plans for apps to run in Chrome OS that were not using ARC, but rather a brand new setup, which Google internally referred to as ARC++. Oracle argued that Google only revealed to them ARC, but not ARC++ and that was super relevant to the fair use argument, because it showed that Android was replacing more than just the mobile device market for Java. But, here's Oracle's big problem: Google had actually revealed to Oracle the plans for ARC++. It appears that Oracle's lawyers just missed that fact. Ouch.
  • Understanding Android's balance between openness and security
    At the 2016 Structure Security conference, Google's Adrian Ludwig talked about the balance between keeping Android as open as possible, while also keeping it secure.
  • Google's Nougat Android update hits the sweet spot: Software 'isn't flashy, but still pretty handy'
    Nougat, Google's latest update of its Android smartphone software, isn't particularly flashy; you might not even notice what's different about it at first. But it offers a number of practical time-saving features, plus a few that could save money — and perhaps even your life. Nougat is starting to appear on phones, including new ones expected from Google next week.
  • How to change the home screen launcher on Android
  • Andromeda: Chrome OS and Android will merge
  • Sale of Kodi 'fully-loaded' streaming boxes faces legal test
  • Android boxes: Middlesbrough man to be first to be prosecuted for selling streaming kits

Endless OS 3.0 is out!

So our latest and greatest Endless OS is out with the new 3.0 version series! The shiny new things include the use of Flatpak to manage the applications; a new app center (GNOME Software); a new icon set; a new Windows installer that gives you the possibility of installing Endless OS in dual-boot; and many bug fixes. Read more

Expandable, outdoor IoT gateway runs Android on i.MX6

VIA’s “Artigo A830” IoT gateway runs Android on an i.MX6 DualLite SoC and offers HDMI, GbE, microSD, numerous serial and USB ports, plus -20 to 60° operation. As the name suggests, the VIA Technologies Artigo A830 Streetwise IoT Platform is designed for outdoor Internet of Things gateway applications. These are said to include smart lockers, vending machines, information kiosks, and signage devices that run “intensive multimedia shopping, entertainment, and navigation applications.” The outdoors focus is supported with an extended -20 to 60°C operating range, as well as surge and ESD protection for surviving challenges such as a nearby lightning strike. Read more