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some leftovers:

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News
  • What's New in KDE 4.10, the Most Advanced Linux Desktop
  • GNOME Shell 3.8 Features: Ctrl will Never Escape Overview
  • Firefox plugins management guide
  • Paradigm Shifting Without A Clutch
  • Video on Linux
  • Top Features For The Linux 3.9 Kernel
  • Arguments Against Rolling Release Ubuntu
  • Rekonq 2.2
  • One instance of make now for LibreOffice
  • How CRON Can Automate Your Tasks And Make Your Life Easier
  • Mutually Exclusive PulseAudio streams
  • Introducing Samba 4 Now, Even More Awesomeness
  • Borqs Joins Linux Foundation to Promote Android
  • Anomaly 2 invades PC, Mac and Linux this spring
  • How to shoot yourself in the foot: Software activism
  • Wargame: European Escalation now available for Linux
  • Gnome Boxes Virtual Machine Manager Introduction
  • Keynote Lineup Confirmed for Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit
  • Open Cubic Player: So much awesome all at once
  • OruxMaps Lets You Go as Far as Your Mapmaking Skill Takes You
  • Qt/GTK Speed On Unity/KDE/Xfce/LXDE/GNOME/Razor
  • How to: Rename multiple files with "rename"
  • Is Accessibility Menu gone from GNOME 3.8?
  • Embedded industrial Linux drives Mars Rover

some odds & ends:

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News
  • openSUSE 12.3 in the Final Stretches
  • Every Install Should Be Minimal
  • Discover Debian's hassle-free trademarks, use them to promote Debian
  • This last week in rawhide, 2013-02-26 edition…
  • Red Hat: Barclays Launches Coverage At Overweight
  • Certified 'Powered by Firefox OS' devices require Firefox Marketplace
  • Linux Admin Tips, Tricks and Tools of the Trade
  • Ubuntu Touch beats Firefox OS to win best of MWC
  • Little Things Make It All Happen
  • Linux 3.8 is NOT a longterm kernel
  • Why you should not use .htaccess (AllowOverride All) in production
  • OLPC XO-4 surfaces at the FCC, right on cue

some leftovers:

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News
  • Chinese Linux Distro Seeks Place in Ubuntu Family
  • Magical Realism: Kentucky Route Zero Act I
  • The Binding of Isaac to Arrive on Steam for Linux
  • Distance – First Greenlit Racing Game – Will Be Launched on Linux
  • The Humble Bundle Mojam #2
  • Novell Files Its Reply Brief v. Microsoft in WordPerfect Appeal
  • Kerkythea Echo Boost - Soon, soon everywhere
  • 'Ubuntu Touch Port-a-Thon': 25 devices and counting
  • Upgrading Fedora from F16 to F17 with seperate /usr logical volume
  • Ever heard about “ArtiKulate”?
  • The Luminosity of Free Software, episode 5
  • Meet the GIMP Episode 187
  • Linux Outlaws 300 – Linux Outlaws Live
  • Red Hat’s Whitehurst lends this advice to business leaders
  • BIND10 1.0.0 available
  • A bright future for Linux in Australia
  • Sabayon 11 Mate Review: Very efficient

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Novell File Reporter 2.0 Released Today
  • Inside Ubuntu Touch | LAS | s25e09
  • Interview Of Naruhiko Ogasawara, LibreOffice Localizer
  • How Ubuntu Turned Search in the Dash into a PR Crisis
  • At the Gates coming to iOS, Mac and Linux.
  • LibreOffice 4 review - Getting better but ...
  • How to prevent a USB mouse auto-suspending
  • Schedule a Daily MySQL Backup on Your Server
  • Linux Sticky Bit Concept Explained with Examples
  • Counter Strike: Condition Zero Now Ported To Linux
  • EXT4 File-System Updated For Linux 3.9
  • Sabayon 11 KDE Review: Great aesthetics and stable performance

some leftovers:

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News
  • 75 Open Source Replacements for Popular Education Apps
  • The Linux Setup - Dan Gillmor, Journalist
  • You can’t have it until we tell you
  • Kademar 5 preview
  • Cool KDE Users
  • Linux Mint Debian 201303 RC released
  • A nasty local kernel vulnerability
  • Linux rootkits abuse SSH service
  • Mageia on Dell XPS
  • Good Book about Blender coming up - 40% off
  • The GUI You Never Knew You Had: The X-Window System
  • Design your own rocket and test flight with OpenRocket
  • Winners announced for Liberated Pixel Cup
  • RMS
  • NILFS2: A Slow But Dependable Linux File-System
  • What you can do to financially help your favorite distro
  • Sabayon 11 XFCE Review: Extremely refined!

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Sony Pirates KDE Artwork
  • Firefox 20 Beta shows off new panel-based Download Manager
  • Red Hat nips, tucks RHEL 6.4 ahead of RHEL 7 later this year
  • OpenMandriva "Secretly" Moving Forward
  • Mandriva unveils the Mandriva Business Server
  • Linux Sound To Be Improved In 3.9 Kernel
  • How To Migrate Linux Between Machines
  • Depression Quest Review
  • Test the reliability and Speed of your DNS in Ubuntu
  • Blender 2.66 Released
  • So, your cronjob did not run
  • GNOME Shell 3.7.9 (3.8 beta) Changelogs
  • What is a pencil used for?

some leftovers:

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News
  • Canonical Ubuntu Linux is STILL not profitable
  • Steam now on Linux –with 60 games
  • Porteus 2.0 Arrives, Replaces Trinity
  • Tablet adventures pt. 2
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 304
  • Open Ballot: Are you excited by the Ubuntu tablet?
  • Another week of rawhide and a note about backups…
  • Ten years
  • Three journaling tools for the Linux desktop
  • why you should never mount guest disk images on the host OS
  • SuperTuxKart Development News
  • Control Your Linux PC With Voice Commands: Siri For Linux?
  • aseigo: control and openness
  • The Luminosity of Free Software, episode 4
  • The new GNOME Shell Interface Arrived!
  • Easily Diagnose Your Network With MTR
  • How to Change the Fonts in GNOME 3
  • Korora 18 (Flo) beta released
  • XFS On Linux 3.9 Takes Care Of Open Issues

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Sabayon 11 GNOME, KDE, MATE, and Xfce preview
  • ZaReason Speaks On UEFI
  • Four ways to share files in Linux
  • What Is Btrfs Filesystem (and Why Is It Better?)
  • LibreOffice Writer now supports gradients in text frame backgrounds
  • KDE Plasma Active Running on Nexus 7 (video)
  • Gnuplot—the Grandfather of Graphing Utilities
  • A new show in town
  • Asian Movies, Subtitles, and Linux
  • How To Write Linux Shell Scripts (Part 3)
  • Open-source your product to unlock its full potential
  • How the co-creator of MySQL came to love databases
  • Red Hat pumping up its data play

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Meet the GIMP - Episode 186: A new Face
  • Winning The Desktop Wars
  • LibreOffice 4.0: First Take
  • GNOME Classic Fights to Win Users Back
  • Berners-Lee visit: Linux Australia pays up
  • GIMP 2.8.4 has been released
  • Why Open Source Software Is Gaining Traction on Wall Street
  • New LibreOffice turns up the heat on Microsoft
  • Mageia’s upgrade script vs FedUp
  • Anodyne Review
  • Dreamfall Chapters stretch goals to Linux
  • Novell BrainShare, SUSE Linux: Why So Quiet?

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • SolusOS 1.2 Review
  • Red Hat CEO: Jobs are coming
  • The Samsung laptop issue is not fixed
  • Highlights of LibreOffice 4.0
  • Steam for Linux will have More Launch Titles Than Mac
  • Raspberry Pi to get camera module soon
  • Reload Ubuntu Linux Laptop Webcam; Fix Without Restart
  • Egypt Government to switch to open source
  • Journalist creates open source solution to extract data from PDFs
  • Savage 2: A Tortured Soul to Arrive on Steam Soon
  • Fedora 18 (Spherical Cow) review
  • Windows 3.1: Geeks' New Choice for Graphics?
  • task-spooler – Personal job scheduler
  • The Linux expect Utility
  • When open-source eats itself, we win
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MX Tools - A year later, the toolbox got better

Roughly fourteen full phases of the moon ago, I wrote an article on MX Tools, a unique and useful bunch of dedicated utilities packaged with the MX Linux distribution. This toolbox offered the ordinary (or new) MX Linux user a chance to perform some common configuration tasks with easy and elegance. In general, MX-16 was a great player, and the recent MX-17 is even better - and at a first glance, so is the new version of MX Tools bundled with the system. Good stuff. So I set about testing, to see what has changed, and in what way this set of utilities has improved, if at all. But I'm positive. Let us commence. [...] MX Tools turned out to be a predictable gem, just as I'd expected. Well, I'm cheating, because I wrote this article after some rather thorough testing. But then, if you look across the wider spectrum of Linux home distributions, there aren't that many unique players with distinctive features. Quite often, it's the rehash of old and familiar with some extra color, polish and rebranding. MX Linux goes the extra mile (or kilometer, if you will) in making the newbie experience meaningfully different. Future improvements could potentially include an interactive walkthrough - so users will be actively prompted and helped along in their tasks. Then of course, there's the matter of visual appearance, in the UI itself. But in general, MX Tools TNG is better than we had before. More elegant, more streamlined, better looking, and most importantly, more practical. This is a good and useful toolbox, and it makes a solid distro even more appealing. Well worth testing. So do it. And take care. Read more

The story of Gentoo management

I have recently made a tabular summary of (probably) all Council members and Trustees in the history of Gentoo. I think that this table provides a very succinct way of expressing the changes within management of Gentoo. While it can’t express the complete history of Gentoo, it can serve as a useful tool of reference. What questions can it answer? For example, it provides an easy way to see how many terms individuals have served, or how long Trustee terms were. You can clearly see who served both on the Council and on the Board and when those two bodies had common members. Most notably, it collects a fair amount of hard-to-find data in a single table. Read more

Success for net neutrality, success for free software

We've had great success with the United States Senate voting in support of net neutrality! Congratulations and thank you to everyone in the US for contacting your congresspeople, and all of you who helped spread the word. However, it's not over yet. Here are more actions you can take if you're in the United States. Now that the (CRA) has passed the Senate, it moves to the House of Representatives. Just as we asked you to call your senators, now it's time to call your House representatives. Find their contact info here and use the script below to ask them to support the reinstatement of net neutrality protections. The timing hasn't been set for future votes and hearings yet, but that's no reason to wait: make sure your representatives know how you feel. Read more Also: GNU Spotlight with Mike Gerwitz: 18 new GNU releases!

today's leftovers

  • 10 Reasons Why Desktop Linux Isn’t Mainstream – For The Record
    10 Reasons Why Desktop Linux Isn’t Mainstream. Yeah, the title is totally link-bait. However, it’s worth noting that I actually deliver what the title describes and then some. Linux is awesome, but sadly, most people haven’t heard of it. Here’s why.
  • Linux Works For You
    Linux allows YOUR computer to work for you, not against you. Wearing this shirt/hoodie demonstrates to all who see it that you are not a slave to your PC. You are in control and Linux is the reason for this.
  • Robin "Roblimo" Miller
    The Linux Journal mourns the passing of Robin Miller, a longtime presence in our community.
  •  
  • Pidgin / Libpurple SkypeWeb Plugin Sees New Stable Release
    SkypeWeb is a plugin that allows using Skype in Pidgin / libpurple chat clients. The plugin can be used to send instant messages and participate in group chats, but it does not yet support voice / video calling.
  • Feral's GameMode May Soon Have Soft Real-Time Capabilities
    Feral Interactive's Linux system tuning daemon, GameMode since being introduced earlier this year has primarily offered the ability to easily change the CPU scaling governor when gaming but not much more. Though a new feature is now in the works for GameMode.
  • Mini DebConf Hamburg
    Last week I attended the MiniDebConfHamburg. I worked on new releases of dracut and rinse. Dracut is an initramfs-tools replacement which now supports early microcode loading. Rinse is a tool similar to debootstrap for rpm distributions, which now can create Fedora 28 environments aka chroots.
  • Android and Automotive Grade Linux battle, as car becomes a data center
    Volvo’s decision to pick Intel’s Atom automotive system-on-chip (SoC) to run in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) for its new XC40 SUV highlights the intensifying competition among chipmakers in this fast growing sphere. The decision to base the system on Android also illuminates the evolving operating system scene for cars, with Linux the primary alternative in its AGL (Automotive Grade Linux) variant. However, given the complementary strengths of Android and Linux, it looks more likely that both will be deployed by many automobile makers in hybrid packages, so that they can take advantage of Android’s huge app ecosystem, encouraging plenty of third party enhancements, as well as harnessing the independence and enterprise scale of Linux. As cars become mini-data centers or edge compute…
  • Vending machine boardset works with UP or UP Squared boards
    Aaeon’s “AIOT-MSSP01” is a vending machine boardset powered by a PIC32 MCU that’s optimized to work with the UP or UP Squared SBCs. It offers vending-friendly I/O like MDB, EXE, and DEX, as well as motor controllers and 6x USB ports. The AIOT-MSSP01 is an industrial-grade vending machine controller (VMC) solution designed to run 24/7 “without a glitch,” says Aaeon. The boardset is optimized for use with the UP or UP Squared SBCs, but works with standard PCs and “most computer boards on the market.” There’s no mention of OS support for the connected computer, but the UP SBCs support Linux, Android, and Windows.