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today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Barnes & Noble NOOK Color hacked to run MeeGo
  • Patching
  • vim: Ni! Ni! Ni! Ni!
  • DisplayLink Continues To Progress On Linux, But No 3D
  • My GNU/Linux & BSD Logo Zoo Version 2.0
  • Fusion Linux - Beyond GNOME 3.0
  • Clockwork Man on USC
  • KDE WebWorld Day Zero
  • Fedora Recognizes Student Contributor with Scholarship
  • Piper Jaffray Reports on Red Hat
  • That Other OS Fails
  • No applications category in Gnome 3.2?
  • Gentoo KDE Team June 2011 meeting
  • Microsoft eyes Ubuntu and Debian love on Hyper-V
  • I’ve been disenfranchised by gnome

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Why I've been throwing Open Standards under the bus
  • Firefox 4 hits 14.2% of worldwide market in May - study
  • IS buys into Linux specialist Synaq
  • Pondering storage options
  • King Arthurs Gold
  • Ditching Copyleft to Compete with a Fork?
  • More on Zero Bugs
  • Gonna 30 Days With...Ubuntu Linux
  • PiTiVi 0.14 "No longer kills kittens"
  • Ubuntu 6.06 LTS (Dapper Drake) End of Life
  • Behind the scenes: a community workshop for Red Hatters
  • FLOSS Weekly 168: ClearOS
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 405

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Ten days to SELF 2011.
  • Gnome Shell
  • Boot-Repair - Simple tool to repair frequent boot problems
  • UI Forensic Tool for File Information - FileInfo
  • Unity interface makes Ubuntu worse.
  • Zenix 2.0
  • Anki - An alternative learning program
  • DOOM Ported to JavaScript and HTML5
  • Celebrating 20 Years of Linux
  • Ubuntu 11.10 Features Defined
  • System76 quietly updates Starling Linux netbook with Atom N570 chip
  • PiTiVi Gets Ready With A New Release
  • DE: Open source in coalition agreement Badem-Wuerttemberg
  • Webian Shell: A full screen web browser built on Chromeless
  • Picking up the pieces
  • GNOME Shell available for Ubuntu 11.10
  • Super OS 11.04: Ubuntu 11.04 With Muscles
  • Should a Power-User Key Mapping Change Be This Difficult?
  • team owner no longer implies team member
  • Bodhi Linux Service Pack 1 Ready to Go
  • music made with gentoo: 20110530
  • Will Google's Chromebooks Play Well with Linux?
  • Linux Cabal
  • Avoid these Drupal hosting mistakes
  • Is Red Hat's Stock Expensive by the Numbers?
  • krunner doing just one thing

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Sometimes the bleeding edge cuts
  • Mixing the Old and the New
  • Elections 2011: fostering the GNOME commercial ecosystem
  • Bodhi Linux 1.1.0 Review (video)
  • Debian moving to Linux 3.0
  • Compositing Modes of KDE Plasma Workspaces Explained
  • FOSS is Fun: A Testing Time
  • Full Circle Podcast #20: A Dutch Pirate with False Teeth
  • Elaine Negroponte on Computer Usage in Schools
  • The Five Pillars Of Ubuntu Server 11.10
  • Small happy things: Fedora 15 and Bluetooth
  • Hey, Ridley, ya got any bmon?
  • Fedora 15 Review | LAS | s17e01
  • aseigo: libplasma2
  • XMonad: a tiling window manager
  • aseigo: Plasma Active: Quick Catch-Up!
  • Ricoh Announces Enterprise Device With Tablet Features

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Compact 1.8GHz Atom PC is just $200
  • KDE 4.7 – A First Look At Beta 1
  • Fedora 15 KDE: When New Old Is Better Than New New
  • Red Hat gives executives raises
  • The First Image Of Desura Running On Linux
  • MeeGo Could Switch Over To Wayland This Year
  • Zero Bugs in Linux
  • OBS—The New Name Speaks Volumes
  • Plasma Compositor and Window Manager in 4.7
  • The Underlying KWin Improvements In KDE 4.7
  • Is AMD Open-Sourcing Something Next Week?
  • Linux Outlaws 209 - FABRAGE x3

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Fedora 15
  • Does Amazon "owe" open source? Maybe a little
  • Hex-a-Hop...heard of it?
  • Gmediafinder - Stream/download files
  • TermKit: The Best of Both Terminal and Graphical World
  • CAOS Theory Podcast 2011.05.27
  • Ubuntu Power Users: first meeting
  • A computer is not a toaster!
  • Ubuntu 9.10 (Karmic Koala) end-of-life reached on April 30, 2011.
  • Mozilla Intros Website Permissions Manager In Firefox 5
  • Changes to Ruby in Debian (and Ubuntu)
  • Developer Interview : Rob Snelders
  • Red Hat (RHT) Could Fall Through $42.42 Support Level
  • KDE Commit Digest for 22 May 2011
  • 4 LibreOffice Splash Screens Worth Checking Out

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Bodhi Linux 1.1.0 Released
  • Yesterday I did a new release of Kraft
  • The Linux Link Tech Show Episode 404
  • Giving Away Unigine's New Real Time Strategy Game
  • Still with ConnochaetOS
  • TuxRadar Podcast Season 3 Episode 10
  • 3 Best Free Partition Managers For Windows, Mac, Linux
  • Fedora 15 and offlineimap users beware
  • MK: Public involved in finalisation of national Open Source policy
  • Awesomium Windowless Web Browser Framework Ported to Linux
  • CleanCache Merged Into The Linux Kernel
  • Need open source policy? Ask the DoD.
  • Why there's no Gentoo Weekly Newsletter Anymore
  • 3 Best Free iTunes Alternatives For Linux
  • Zukitwo: Beautiful GNOME Theme Pack
  • U.S. Considers Open-Source Software for Cybersecurity

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu – Beginner’s First Choice
  • Text Encryption Made Easy With Scrambled Egg
  • MOC (music on console) - Console audio player for LINUX/UNIX
  • Debian 6.0: Fat, Fatter, Slim
  • Six Quick Tips Get You Started with Open Compliance
  • Ailurus is not just a powerful tweaker
  • Debian announces Chinese Mirror
  • Ubuntu Ambiance Theme for Gnome Shell
  • Northern Islands & Fermi Busted On Open-Source
  • In Search Of Enterprise Organizations Utilizing KDE
  • Linux 2.6.40/3.0 Kernel Has New Microsoft Kinect Driver
  • NCIX, a very nice choice for *nix
  • Time for Amazon to pay its dues to open source?
  • New opera snapshot
  • Defending against Firefox extensions that may spy on you
  • FLOSS Weekly 167: Racket
  • FSF license recommendations guide
  • Xamarin recruits best CEO in the Industry

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • X Server 1.11 Breaks The Video Driver ABI
  • Quicklist Editor for Unity Launcher
  • Another great app to convert your webcam into a security camera
  • systemd Documentation
  • Keep up to date with GNOME Shell Extensions
  • Using Scribus to Draw George
  • GNOME Tweak gets option to disable/enable extentions
  • Having Linux Support For Your Hardware At Launch
  • The Open Source Road Ahead: Individuals matter
  • Debian 6.0: Cleanup
  • No party for you. Fedora Tradition cancelled.
  • SE: Framework agreement increases use of open source
  • Phonon’s New Awesome Website + Wallpaper

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Opening up the Open Source Initiative
  • Hacker Evolution Duality
  • Iptables – A poor man’s firewall
  • Drupal 7 simplifies Web site management
  • Terminator - a terminal program for Linux
  • De-Googling My Life, Part 1
  • Super boot manager
  • The Humble Homebrew Collection
  • Calligra Announces First Snapshot Release
  • One Laptop per Child takes off in Suhum Kraboa Coaltar District
  • GNOME 3 Live image release 1.3.0
  • Assign Different Wallpapers To Different Workspaces On Ubuntu 11.04
  • EU/UK: FSFE appeals for information on OSS deployments
  • IKEA using Drupal
  • Community Team Plans For Oneiric
  • 55 Open Source Replacements for Information/Project Management Tools
  • GNOME Shell Weather Extention
  • Fuduntu 14.10 Release Candidate
  • New Opera Snapshot
  • When FOSS Became Mainstream
  • How to request GNOME 3 PromoDVD
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