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News

some shorts:

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News
  • KDE 4
  • Linux Mint 7 (Gloria) KDE
  • Plymouth Gets An X11 Renderer Plug-In

today's leftovers:

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News
  • Linux Outlaws 114 - LinuxCon 2009 Special
  • Using an Epson Perfection V30 scanner in Linux
  • Linux Mint
  • Firefox Tips
  • Search Your Files Using Catfish
  • LiberKey applications work on Debian through Wine
  • Free software is so easy…you don’t even need a keyboard
  • Fedora: XZ takes over Gzip in RPM
  • The Linux Command Line - Third Draft Now Available
  • 2009 Gentoo 10 Screenshot Winners
  • Using Gentoo on a server without C++ compiler
  • October morning sky fills with planets
  • When a laptop’s too much, try a netbook
  • Linux's biggest failing
  • Some Linux Shell Commands

few leftovers:

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News
HowTos
  • Linux / UNIX: Restrict Access To A Given Command
  • Computers make big difference for families in need
  • Use this iptables script for Web/Mail server security
  • Launch Application Menu In Ubuntu With Windows Key
  • Gnome Find Drive Serial Number
  • Steuben ARC switched to Linux after hack

today's leftovers:

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News
  • Lightweight Arora web browser turns 0.10.0
  • The Redmond Hype Machine Revs Its Engines — Again
  • Tiny Core Linux 2.3 : Linux 2u
  • Changes to releases.ubuntu.com rsync/FTP access
  • 4.4 million-year-old pre-human ancestor "Ardi" discovered
  • Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala Beta: First Looks
  • IBM's developerWorks portal celebrates 10th anniversary
  • X.org Server 1.7.0 released
  • xkcd - you're a linux user
  • Linux Australia: Linux.conf.au domain has a future
  • Plugins and static libraries don't mix well
  • Strength of support models and symbiosis for free and open source software
  • Meet the GIMP Episode 121: Transparent Transformations and Getting Rich with GIMP

today's leftovers:

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News
  • The OpenBlockS 600 is a Linux server that fits in your palm
  • FSF offering "GNU Bucks" for finding nonfree works in free distributions
  • Kings of open source monitoring
  • No FOSS for Palm app catalog says Netscape pioneer
  • KDE + PulseAudio != Sucks
  • Heileen 2 Announced
  • Patents May Cause Issues For OpenGL 3 In Mesa
  • Linux microserver speeds up
  • Open source groups to merge
  • When An Open Source Company Gets Acquired, What Happens to the Project?
  • Chrome and Chromium for Linux Dev Builds Get Extension Manager
  • Open Source software growing in importance
  • Instant-On Linux: Who Wins With It?
  • Korea Cottons on to the Microsoft Monoculture
  • Mozilla Firefox, Disconnected Installer

today's leftovers:

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News
  • UK needs to be more open to open source
  • What Light on Yonder gov.uk Site Breaks?
  • Will Friction Between Microsoft and Open-Source Community Cause Flames?
  • Further Reflections on the CodePlex Foundation: The Glass Half Full
  • Portland Plans to Become Open Source Mecca
  • The wrong marketing for open source
  • Computer dream sees light of day
  • One laptop per child
  • Economics and virtualization stunt Linux server growth
  • Gentoo 10.0, Sabayon 5.0, Entropy, New Servers
  • Two Linux smartphones set for October release in U.S.
  • Moving to an IDE for programming (Eclipse with PyDev)
  • Wow, I am Surprised that Linux is Bloated
  • C is for Crap
  • End Users Meet Year End
  • The $300 Home-Brew Street-View Camera
  • Ubuntu Moblin Remix walkthrough – Video
  • There’s More to Dropbox Than Piracy
  • 2009 Is The Year of GNU/Linux On The Desktop
  • Proposed X.org development cycle changes
  • 10 of the Best Free Linux Web Browsers
  • Novell forces customers to pay for maintenance
  • Mandriva: Some things just take time
  • Linux Outlaws 113 - Remember Cancún?
  • TuxRadar: Podcast Season 1 Episode 18

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Mac OSX-like theme for your GNOME desktop
  • Ten Of The Best GNOME Themes
  • 10 Days of Ubuntu 10.10 Feature Requests Day 8, Day 7
  • GDM Updated In Karmic Alpha 6
  • Mozilla VP: Chrome Frame is the wrong answer
  • Open-Source Software: An All-Star Lineup
  • Ohio Linuxfest 2009 Review
  • What does advertising say about open source?
  • List of features of OpenOffice.org 3.2
  • 25 years of GNU - support software freedom
  • Plymouth Gets A DRM Renderer Plug-In
  • Dropbox hits two million Windows, Mac and Linux users
  • multiple inheritance - why still using it
  • The Myth of Crowdsourcing
  • HP "Entertainment PC" Revisited
  • Open Source and Open Standards at Home
  • Moblin Brings Btrfs into View, Eschews Ext4
  • IDC: Organisations adopt open source to reduce expenses
  • Congrats Fabio!
  • Karmic Beta Testing
  • Kubuntu Beta Candidate Testing Needed
  • Is open source software finding a home in Whitehall?
  • Q&A With A Post-Microsoft Sam Ramji

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Mandriva 2010 backgrounds contribution
  • Nvidia Releases OpenCL Drivers
  • Great new features in OOo 3.2
  • 5 of the most popular Linux powered mobile devices of 2009
  • Open source can save schools billions
  • User Agent Switcher keeps Ubuntu usable at College
  • Rutgers using Drupal
  • More SMBs are adopting open source
  • Osmos Coming to Linux
  • Aquaria Coming to Linux
  • With Zipit, who needs a netbook?
  • Open source is a platform, not a product
  • Neterion, Intel, Red Hat Jointly Demonstrate Single Root I/O Virtualization Technology
  • So I “Hacked” My Crappy MP3 Player
  • Google's Doodles: 10 of the best including UFOs and Googlle
  • Quirky Wallpaper Series: Random NASA Wallpaper Script

today's odds & ends

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News
  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #161
  • Mozilla developers move to Palm
  • 10 Open-Source Developments You Need To Know About
  • Learning to love vim
  • Linux Networking and the Intel Atom D945GCLF2
  • Power to the user
  • Xtra Ordinary OS Review: Better than Ubuntu

today's leftovers & stuff

Filed under
News
  • GNU/Linux and FOSS versus “Software Piracy”
  • Opera 10.10 – Another Beta, With Fixes For More Than Unite
  • Linux: Gloobus - Quicklook for Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Live CD with LVM capability
  • New: OOo-DEV 3.x Developer Snapshot
  • eee-control – Utility for controlling Eee PC hardware
  • Set your Default Gateway using Route
  • Chromium Linux now has flash support out of the box
  • Flip Flops Are Evil
  • The First Geek Wedding At a LinuxFest
  • Linux Audio Conversion Trick
  • Lucid Lynx – What We Know So Far
  • Linux Advertises on the Radio
  • LinuxCon Audio Diary 3
  • Howto integrate KDE into your life
  • Cuteness 4.6
  • Heroes of Newerth Preview
  • Linux: My Mouse Ate My Homework!
  • Add Stereo Audio Tracks to MKV Files
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More in Tux Machines

Scrivener Writing Software has a Linux Version

In some ways, Scrivener is the very embodiment of anti-Linux, philosophically. Scrivener is a writing program, used by authors. In Linux, one strings together well developed and intensely tested tools on data streams to produce a result. So, to author a complex project, create files and edit them in a simple text editor, using some markdown. Keep the files organized in the file system and use file names carefully chosen to keep them in order in their respective directories. when it comes time to make project-wide modifications, use grep and sed to process all of the files at once or selected files. Eventually, run the files through LaTeX to produce beautiful output. Then, put the final product in a directory where people can find it on Gopher.

Gopher? Anyway …

On the other hand, emacs is the ultimate linux program. Emacs is a text editor that is so powerful and has so many community-contributed “modes” (like add-ins) that it can be used as a word processor, an email client, a calendar, a PIM, a web browser, an operating system, to make coffee, or to stop that table with the short leg from rocking back and forth. So, in this sense, a piece of software that does everything is also linux, philosophically.

And so, Scrivener, despite what I said above, is in a way the very embodiment of Linux, philosophically.

I’ve been using Scrivener on a Mac for some time now, and a while back I tried it on Linux. Scrivener for the Mac is a commercial product you must pay money for, though it is not expensive, but the Linux version, being highly experimental and probably unsafe, is free. But then again, this is Linux. We eat unsafe experimental free software for breakfast. So much that we usually skip lunch. Because we’re still fixing breakfast. As it were.

Details with Screen Shots Here

Anyway, here’s what Scrivener does. It does everything. The full blown Mac version has more features than the Linux version, but both are feature rich. To me, the most important things are: A document is organised in “scenes” which can be willy nilly moved around in relation to each other in a linear or hierarchical system. The documents are recursive, so a document can hold other documents, and the default is to have only the text in the lower level document as part of the final product (though this is entirely optional). A document can be defined as a “folder” which is really just a document that has a file folder icon representing it to make you feel like it is a folder.

Associated with the project, and with each separate document, is a note taking area. So, you can jot notes project-wide as you work, like “Don’t forget to write the chapter where everyone dies at the end,” or you can write notes on a given document like “Is this where I should use the joke about the slushy in the bathroom at Target?” Each scene also has a number of attributes such as a “label” and a “status” and keywords. I think keywords may not be implemented in the Linux version yet.

Typically a project has one major folder that has all the actual writing distributed among scenes in it, and one or more additional folders in which you put stuff that is not in the product you are working on, but could be, or was but you pulled it out, or that includes research material.

You can work on one scene at a time. Scenes have meta-data and document notes.

The scenes, folders, and everything are all held together with a binder typically displayed on the left side of the Scrivener application window, showing the hierarchy. A number of templates come with the program to create pre-organized binder paradigms, or you can just create one from scratch. You can change the icons on the folders/scenes to remind you of what they are. When a scene is active in the central editing window, you can display an “inspector” on the right side, showing the card (I’ll get to that later) on top the meta data, and the document or project notes. In the Mac version you can create additional meta-data categories.

An individual scene can be displayed in the editing window. Or, scenes can be shown as a collection of scenes in what is known as “Scrivenings mode.” Scrivenings mode is more or less standard word processing mode where all the text is simply there to scroll through, though scene titles may or may not be shown (optional). A lot of people love the corkboard option. I remember when PZ Myers discovered Scrivener he raved about it. The corkboard is a corkboard (as you may have guessed) with 3 x 5 inch virtual index cards, one per scene, that you can move around and organize as though that was going to help you get your thoughts together. The corkboard has the scene title and some notes on what the scene is, which is yet another form of meta-data. I like the corkboard mode, but really, I don’t think it is the most useful features. Come for the corkboard, stay for the binder and the document and project notes!

Community chest: Storage firms need to pay open-source debts

Linux and *BSD have completely changed the storage market. They are the core of so many storage products, allowing startups and established vendors alike to bring new products to the market more rapidly than previously possible. Almost every vendor I talk to these days has built their system on top of these and then there are the number of vendors who are using Samba implementations for their NAS functionality. Sometimes they move on from Samba but almost all version 1 NAS boxen are built on top of it. Read more

Black Lab SDK 1.8 released

QT Creator - for QT 5 Gambas 3 - Visual Basic for Linux Ubuntu Quickly - Quick and dirty development tool for python emacs and Xemacs - Advanced Text Editor Anjuta and Glade - C++ RAD development tool for GTK Netbeans - Java development environment GNAT-GPS - IDE for the following programming languages. Ada, C, JavaScript, Pascal and Python Idle - IDE for Python Scite - Text Editor Read more

Did Red Hat’s CTO Walk – Or Was He Pushed?

He went on to say that some within Red Hat speculate that tensions between Stevens and Paul Cormier, Red Hat’s president of products and technologies, might be responsible, although there doesn’t appear to have been any current argument between the two. Cormier will take over Stevens’ duties until a replacement is found. Vaughan-Nichols also said that others at Red Hat had opined that Stevens might’ve left because he’d risen as high as he could within the company and with no new advancement opportunities open to him, he’d decided to move on. If this was the case, why did he leave so abruptly? Stevens had been at Red Hat for nearly ten years. If he was leaving merely because “I’ve done all I can here and it’s time to seek my fortune elsewhere,” we’d expect him to work out some kind of notice and stay on the job long enough for Red Hat to find a suitable replacement. Turning in a resignation that’s effective immediately is not the ideal way to walk out the door for the last time. It smells of burning bridges. Read more